1,684 results for Book item

  • Street health: Practitioner service provision for Maori homeless people in Auckland

    Nikora, Linda Waimarie; Hodgetts, Darrin; Groot, Shiloh Ann Maree; Stolte, Ottilie Emma Elisabeth; Chamberlain, Kerry (2012-09)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Drawing insights from interviews with Maori homeless people, health professionals, and relevant local and international literatures, this chapter focuses on the provision of medical care to homeless people. In particular, we propose that health services orientate to accommodate the worldviews and circumstances of Maori homeless people. Below we consider colonialism and societal developments that have led to homelessness among Maori today. We then present a case study of ‘Grant’, which was compiled from common aspects of various Maori homeless people who access health services at the Auckland City Mission (ACM); an organisation with a long history of catering to the needs and hopes of dispossessed groups, providing food, clothing, advocacy, social and health services. The relational orientation of healthcare at the ACM is discussed, and leads to an exploration of ‘judgement-free service space’ for meeting client needs (cf., Trussell & Mair, 2010). Lastly, we focus on how health professionals can respond to the multiple healthcare needs of Maori homeless people, in partnership with social services.

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  • Three feminist critiques of varying feminist capitulations to crisis-hegemony

    Grear, Anna (2011)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    The seemingly intractable pull between the Scylla of 'resistance' and the Charybdis of 'compliance' and the agonistic dilemmas presented by the complexity and difficulty of positioning feminism in relation to them both is well-traced in these chapters by Dianne Otto, Julie Mertus and Maria Grahn-Farley. While a range of themes emerges from reflection on these nuanced and thoughtful chapters, at the heart of each, in different ways, the colonisation of certain emancipatory feminist projects and agendas by the crisis-driven post 9/11 international legal discourse emerges as a central concern, along with a set of related sub-themes: The traction (and inequality) of hegemonic and counter-hegemonic thought-worlds and actions; the pernicious effects of decontextualisation (either the transcendence or the 'emptying out' of context (including,worryingly, lived experience of violation)); the fragile potency of ground level viewpoint, action and perspective; the false totality of the securityhegemon; its liquid propagandism, and related concerns circling around co-opted feminist responses.

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  • Engineering: good for technology education?

    Williams, P. John (2011)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Recent curriculum changes in the educational system of Australia have resulted in study options being available in Engineering for senior secondary students to use for university entrance. In other educational systems, Engineering is playing an increasingly important role, either as a stand-alone subject or as part of an integrated approach to Science, Mathematics and Technology. These developments raise questions about the relationship between Engineering and Technology education, some of which are explored in this paper.

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  • Evolving connectionist systems for adaptive sport coaching

    Bacic, B; Kasabov, N; MacDonell, S; Pang, SN (2011-10-31)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Contemporary computer assisted coaching software operates either on a particular sub-space of the wider problem or requires expert(s) to operate and provide explanations and recommendations. This paper introduces a novel motion data processing methodology oriented to the provision of future generation sports coaching software. The main focus of investigation is the development of techniques that facilitate processing automation, incremental learning from initially small data sets, and robustness of architecture with a degree of interpretation on individual sport performers’ motion techniques. Findings from a case study using tennis motion data verify the prospect of building similar models and architectures for other sports or entertainment areas in which the aims are to improve human motion efficacy and to prevent injury. A central feature is the decoupling of the high-level analytical architecture from the low-level processing of motion data acquisition hardware, meaning that the system will continue to work with future motion acquisition devices.

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  • Introduction

    Barnard, Roger; Burns, Anne (2012)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    The book aims to fill the gap between conventional research methodology books and published reports of research such as are found in academic journals. While volumes on methodology may explain how and why a particular approach to data collection should be used, they tend not to give specific and detailed examples of the 'messiness' of research - what may go wrong and how to overcome the obstacles that invariably get in the way of a smooth research journey.

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  • Responses of salmonids to habitat changes

    Hicks, Brendan J.; Hall, James D.; Bisson, P. A.; Sedell, J. R. (1991)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Streams in western North America provide spawning and rearing habitats for several species of salmon and trout that are of substantial economic importance in the region. Timber that grows on lands through which these streams flow is also economically important, and its harvest can substantially change habitat conditions and aquatic production in salmonid streams. Undisturbed forests, the streams that flow through them, and the salmonid communities in these streams have intrinsic scientific, genetic, and cultural values in addition to their economic importance. The complex relations between salmonids and their physical environment, and the changes in these relations brought about by timber harvest, have been investigated extensively (see the bibliography by Macdonald et al. 1988). However, in spite of considerable evidence of profound changes in channel morphology and in light, temperature, and flow regimes associated with timber harvests, much uncertainty exists about the responses of salmonids to these changes.

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  • To act or not to act? That is the question!

    Bruce Ferguson, Pip (2013)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    The year was 2003. I was a new Research Manager working in a Māori tertiary institution that had a history of inequitable treatment by government, through not receiving establishment funding that had gone unproblematically to non-Māori institutions. Repeating a common pattern in New Zealand, our government had decided to implement a research funding scheme, to be measured at the level of the individual academic. My institution’s decision to participate in the PBRF was not without its difficulties, and it is here that the ethics of participation become problematic. This chapter is about our ability to articulate our values, to show how we work these out in our practice, and how we are accountable to ourselves and others for that practice. Would I, with the benefit of hindsight, have encouraged my institution to enter the PBRF again?

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  • Skilled migration in and out of New Zealand: immigrants, workers, students and emigrants

    Bedford, R (2012-11-22)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    No abstract.

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  • ‘Framing the project’ of international human rights law: Reflections on the dysfunctional ‘family’ of the Universal Declaration

    Grear, Anna (2012)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Full text embargoed until November 2013.

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  • Drug delivery by electroporation: Review

    Talele, Sadhana (2013)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Drug delivery is the method or process of administering a pharmaceutical compound to achieve a therapeutic effect in humans or animals. Most common routes of administration include the preferred non-invasive peroral (through the mouth), topical (skin), transmucosal (nasal, buccal/sublingual, vaginal, ocular and rectal) and inhalation routes. Current effort in the area of drug delivery include the development of targeted delivery in which the drug is only active in the target area of the body (for example, in cancerous tissues) and sustained release formulations in which the drug is released over a period of time in a controlled manner from a formulation. This is achieved by combining electroporation with the input of drugs at a location. This paper reviews the process of electroporation and then further discusses the electrochemotherapy, one of the most upcoming application of electroporation in biotechnology.

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  • EEG signal processing for brain-computer interfaces

    Georgieva, P; Silva, F; Milanova, M; Kasabov, N (2014-03-21)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    This chapter is focused on recent advances in electroencephalogram (EEG) signal processing for brain computer interface (BCI) design. A general overview of BCI technologies is first presented, and then the protocol for motor imagery noninvasive BCI for mobile robot control is discussed. Our ongoing research on noninvasive BCI design based not on recorded EEG but on the brain sources that originated the EEG signal is also introduced. We propose a solution to EEG-based brain source recovering by combining two techniques, a sequential Monte Carlo method for source localization and spatial filtering by beamforming for the respective source signal estimation. The EEG inverse problem is previously studded assuming that the source localization is known. In this work for the first time the problem of inverse modeling is solved simultaneously with the problem of the respective source space localization.

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  • Ontologies and machine learning systems

    Tegginmath, S; Pears, R; Kasabov, N (2014-03-21)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    In this chapter we review the uses of ontologies within bioinformatics and neuroinformatics and the various attempts to combine machine learning (ML) and ontologies, and the uses of data mining ontologies. This is a diverse field and there is enormous potential for wider use of ontologies in bioinformatics and neuroinformatics research and system development. A systems biology approach comprising of experimental and computational research using biological, medical, and clinical data is needed to understand complex biological processes and help scientists draw meaningful inferences and to answer questions scientists have not even attempted so far.

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  • Maori and psychology: Indigenous psychology in New Zealand

    Nikora, Linda Waimarie (2007)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Maori have their own approaches to health and well-being, which stem from a world view that values balance, continuity, unity and purpose. The world view is not typically thought of as 'psychology', yet it is a foundation for shared understandings and intelligible action among Maori. Maori behaviours, values, ways of doing things and understandings are often not visible nor valued. However, through these opening years of the twenty-first century, psychologists are slowly turning their attention to addressing this invisibility with the explicit agenda of building 'indigenous psychologies'

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  • Information methods for predicting risk and outcome of stroke

    Liang, L; Krishnamurthi, R; Kasabov, N; Feigin, V (2014-03-21)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Stroke is a major cause of disability and mortality in most economically developed countries. It is the second leading cause of death worldwide (after cancer and heart disease) [55.1, 2] and a major cause of disability in adults in developed countries [55.3]. Personalized modeling is an emerging effective computational approach, which has been applied to various disciplines, such as in personalized drug design, ecology, business, and crime prevention; it has recently become more prominent in biomedical applications. Biomedical data on stroke risk factors and prognostic data are available in a large volume, but the data are complex and often difficult to apply to a specific person. Individualizing stroke risk prediction and prognosis will allow patients to focus on risk factors specific to them, thereby reducing their stroke risk and managing stroke outcomes more effectively. This chapter reviews various methods–conventional statistical methods and computational intelligent modeling methods for predicting risk and outcome of stroke.

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  • Computational modeling with spiking neural networks

    Schliebs, S; Kasabov, N (2014-03-21)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    This chapter reviews recent developments in the area of spiking neural networks (SNN) and summarizes the main contributions to this research field. We give background information about the functioning of biological neurons, discuss the most important mathematical neural models along with neural encoding techniques, learning algorithms, and applications of spiking neurons. As a specific application, the functioning of the evolving spiking neural network (eSNN) classification method is presented in detail and the principles of numerous eSNN based applications are highlighted and discussed.

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  • A fair go for all: a problematic contribution to anti-racism praxis in Aotearoa

    Came, H (2013-11-23)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    In New Zealand, the Human Rights Commission is the lead agency in countering institutional racism. They have recently undertaken a major research project, A Fair Go For All (Human Rights Commission 2011), to inform the development of a national strategy/approach to counter structural discrimination. This paper, from an activist scholarship standpoint argues their chosen approach has ignoring the power relations inherent in researching racism. Furthermore their approach has minimised both the historic element of racism against Māori and the significance of Te Tiriti o Waitangi to anti-racism praxis in Aotearoa. Rather than endorse an ad hoc approach with a focus on practitioner bias (personally-mediated racism), and addressing ethnic inequalities (the outcome of institutional racism) this paper advocates for a Tiriti based systems change approach to transform institutional racism as it manifests in the neo-colonial context of Aotearoa.

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  • Brain, gene, and quantum inspired computational intelligence

    Kasabov, N (2014-03-21)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    This chapter discusses opportunities and challenges for the creation of methods of computational intelligence (CI) and more specifically – artificial neural networks (ANN), inspired by principles at different levels of information processing in the brain: cognitive, neuronal, genetic, and quantum, and mainly, the issues related to the integration of these principles into more powerful and accurate CI methods. It is demonstrated how some of these methods can be applied to model biological processes and to improve our understanding in the subject area; generic CI methods being applicable to challenging generic AI problems. The chapter first offers a brief presentation of some principles of information processing at different levels of the brain and then presents brain inspired, gene inspired, and quantum inspired CI. The main contribution of the chapter, however, is the introduction of methods inspired by the integration of principles from several levels of information processing, namely: A computational neurogenetic model that in one model combines gene information related to spiking neuronal activities. A general framework of a quantum spiking neural network (SNN) model. A general framework of a quantum computational neurogenetic model (CNGM). Many open questions and challenges are discussed, along with directions for further research.

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  • Introduction (to "Read this first: growth and development of creative SMEs")

    Thomassen, A; Hagoort, G; Van Thiel, M; Arets, D; Oostinjen, A (2011-12-07)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Marian Jacobse is a Utrecht-based sculptor. She is also the director of Sophies Kunstprojecten, which manages more than 15 studio complexes and produces community-oriented arts projects in the city. Its operations are determined by the dilemmas affecting art and commercialism, or more specifically, the creation of art and earning money. The various studios support not only the practice of art by independent artists, but also works produced by creative professionals: people who manage and stage cultural shows in an enterprising manner, based on creative concepts. Jacobse did her arts training in Utrecht and developed her entrepreneurship by acquiring experience, attending courses and, in particular, developing networks. She aspires to keeping the artistic flame burning, while avoiding financial disaster.

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  • Coopetition in supply chains: a case study of a coopetitive structure in the horticulture industry

    Wood, LC (2013-11-11)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Supply chain management has been increasingly seen as a strategic tool to improve the competitiveness of companies. Coopetition, the mingling of competitive and cooperative relationships, has been utilised by New Zealand companies in the horticulture industry to help break into and develop new markets. Using a case study various elements of the supply chain are examined from both strategic and operational perspectives for this group of companies and their customers and suppliers. The connections to the customer are shown to be enhanced through careful implementation, as the group of companies act to adjust their entire supply chains to make them increasingly customer-orientated. Significant benefits that are shown to accrue include improved information flow, increased ability to supply, and flexibility to meet customer requirements.

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  • Poverty reduction strategies via public-private partnerships: the role of e-government solutions in supporting supplier diversity programmes

    Jeeva, AS; Wood, LC (2013-11-11)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Government procurement practices influence large volumes of spending in communities and further procurement can be influenced through legislative efforts. Through these mechanisms government bodies carry significant influence on the way in which procurement spend occurs and they have the ability to influence the direction that the procurement may take. Carefully constructed parameters in public-private partnerships (PPP) can shift the focus of procurement activities towards engaging with the local businesses and communities. This represents an approach for government bodies to increase supplier diversity so that, in alignment with UN Millennium goals of poverty reduction, local suppliers can be provided with business opportunities and methods to reduce poverty. A two-focus approach is adopted; first, government drivers and policies are examined in the context of social engagement. Second, the roles and challenges faced by small firms in the local communities are highlighted. This demonstrates the way in which e-government procurement systems play a pivotal role in supporting local sourcing initiatives.

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