1,684 results for Book item

  • The influence of context on science curricula: Observations, conclusions and some recommendations for curriculum development and implementation

    Coll, Richard K.; Taylor, Neil (2008)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    The genesis of this project and book was our experiences of teaching science and science education at various levels in developing countries; in the Pacific and the Caribbean. These experiences along with numerous conversations with other teachers and educators who had worked in Africa and elsewhere left us with something of a sense of despair. We constantly confronted Western or foreign science curricula which were plainly alien to science learners in non-Western contexts. We witnessed numerous curricula reforms and professional development initiatives, many of which seemed doomed to failure. In fact Helu-Thaman (1991) referred to the ‘wreckage’ of aid-funded curricula initiatives all around the Pacific. Probably the most alarming aspect in all of this was the role of the foreign expert. Someone, normally ‘aid-funded’, who turned up for a short period of time to tell the locals what they should be doing! The naiveté of some of these people was truly remarkable (or perhaps they just didn’t care?). Failure of the program or reforms was generally attributed to the locals not ‘seeing it through’ or not quite understanding the new curriculum initiatives. There was little effort made to take into account local conditions or the views of local experts, especially teachers.

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  • Wine maturation using high electric field

    Talele, Sadhana; Benseman, Mark (2013)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Wine maturation can take a long time and consumes storage space which can be a drawback while considering commercial aspect of wine making. In the past scientists have carried out experiments on maturing wine quickly using ultrasounds or gamma radiations. This study reports about maturing wine with high electric field at different frequencies applied for a short time duration. The electric field intensity and the frequency of the field along with the exposure time of wine to this field seem to be important parameters that could affect the the treated wine. Results obtained are encouraging and have a potential for commercial interest.

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  • The derivation of Markov Chain Properties using Generalized Matrix Inverses

    Hunter, JJ (2012-01-20)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    In many stochastic models a Markov chain is present either directly or indirectly through some form of embedding. The analysis of many problems of interest associated with these models, eg. stationary distributions, moments of first passage time distributions and moments of occupation time random variables, often requires the solution of a system of linear equations involving I – P, where P is the transition matrix of a finite, irreducible, discrete time Markov chain. Generalized matrix inverses play an important role in the solution of such singular sets of equations. In this presentation we survey the application of generalized inverses to the aforementioned problems focussing primarily on Markov chains.

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  • Max White

    White, M (2011-12-01)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    This publication grew out of the exhibition "components of a special collection: a collaboration with the University of Auckland Fine Arts Library" at projectspace B431 from March 31 to April 09, 2011. The exhibition was formed from a desire, firstly to make the Library's collection of artists books available as a public display and secondly to identify themes in the collection and open them up to theoretical analysis. Rather than define the collection, the methodology of the project sought to unpack its possibilities. My written contribution to this catalogue (artist book) followed the authors' request for responses to five specific questions asked of every contributor.

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  • Immersive Virtual Environments to facilitate authentic education in Logistics and Supply Chain Management

    Reiners, T; Wood, LC (2013-11-11)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    This chapter will cover our current research focus concerning developing and trialling immersive environments as an innovative and authentic approach to teaching and learning in Logistics and Supply Chain Management, incorporating seamlessly integrated assessment and feedback. Developed educational and assessment tools will allow students to demonstrate that they have successfully applied theoretical knowledge in real contexts and developed appropriate skills before entering the workforce. Greater authenticity allows students to experience different roles and exposes them to multiple business cases over supply chains that, in reality, span the globe. The project addresses the inauthentic pedagogical approaches in current classroom and distance-learning environments, and will propose a methodology that utilises existing technologies. The simulation will combine emerging technologies to represent multiple problem dimensions into one space; enabling students to observe, engage, interact, and participate in self-guided or group-based learning scenarios; receiving instant, multi-perspective, media-rich feedback to support their learning; and enabling further iterative scenario-based training.

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  • Software engineering management

    Frailey, DJ; MacDonell, SG; Gray, AR (2011-08-13)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Software Engineering Management can be defined as the application of management activities—planning, coordinating, measuring, monitoring, controlling, and reporting—to ensure that the development and maintenance of software is systematic, disciplined, and quantified (IEEE610.12-90). The Software Engineering Management KA therefore addresses the management and measurement of software engineering. While measurement is an important aspect of all KAs, it is here that the topic of measurement programs is presented.

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  • Role of mathematical modelling and applications in university service courses: an across countries study

    Klymchuk, S; Zverkova, T

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    The aim of this study was to find out what university students, studying mathematics as a service course, think about the role of the mathematical modelling process and application problems in their studies. For this purpose a questionnaire was given to more than 500 students from 14 universities in 9 countries. The research was not a comparison of countries or universities: an across countries study approach was chosen to reduce the affect of differences in education systems, curricula, cultures. The results of the questionnaire were analysed and presented in the paper. In particular, an attempt was made to identify which step of the mathematical modelling process the students found most difficult.

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  • Graphical displays in eco-feedback: a cognitive approach

    Ford, Rebecca; Karlin, Beth (2013)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Psychological research indicates that the provision of feedback is a key element in reinforcing and/or changing behavior, and whilst results from empirical studies on eco-feedback are positive, variation in findings suggests that its effectiveness may depend on both what information is provided and how it is presented. The design of graphical displays is an important component, but past display research has been primarily qualitative and exploratory. This paper introduces and tests a cognitive model of visual information processing applied to eco-feedback to evaluate differences in interpretation and preference between images. Participants were shown images that varied by number of data points as well as display features and were asked to interpret the images and report on image usability. Findings support the cognitive model, suggesting that eco-feedback displays appear to be more successful when they: (1) contain fewer data points; (2) employ data chunking; and/or (3) include pictures.

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  • Global Regulation of Nanotechnologies and Their Products in Medicine

    Moore, Jennifer (2013)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Nanotechnology, an emerging technology, is creating innovative medicinal products for clinical use. The convergence of nanotechnologies with medicine is predicted to transform the health care sector, particularly pharmaceutical development. Jurisdictions, such as the European Union, the United States, Australia, and New Zealand, have witnessed the launch of medical products containing nanomaterials. Many of the nanomedicines on the market, in clinical testing, or under regulatory review, promise to improve existing products and treat diseases more effectively. The purposes of this chapter are to (a) describe nanotechnology, in particular, its clinical applications; (b) analyze the application of medical products regulation in several jurisdictions (the European Union, United States, Australia, and New Zealand); and (c) assess the adequacy of this law for managing the potential risks posed by nanomedicines. There are gaps in the public health/health science evidence about the risks associated with nanomedicines, and there is concern that the novel properties of some nanomedicines will bring unforeseen human and environmental health and safety risks. Analysts project that, by 2014, the market for medical products containing nanomaterials will be US$18 billion per year. Given the predicted market for nanomedicines, and the growing evidence of their potential risks, it is important to have adequate regulation of these products to prevent adverse public health outcomes. Regulators and clinicians will need to consider the risks posed by some nanomedicines against the potential benefits to patients who are prescribed these products.

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  • The Impact of Therapeutic Jurisprudence on the New Zealand Coronial Jurisdiction

    Moore, Jennifer (2015)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Coroners in New Zealand can make recommendations that may reduce the chances of occurrence of similar deaths in the future. Coronial recommendations can have pro-therapeutic outcomes. The recommendations hold therapeutic promise for bereaved families by refocusing families towards prevention of similar deaths. However, when coroners' recommendations are not implemented, this has counter-therapeutic outcomes for the community who deserve remedial action, and for families who hoped for change. This chapter uses evidence from New Zealand's first empirical study of coroners' recommendations. An empirical approach is taken because therapeutic jurisprudence is concerned with assessing the law's impact on people, and the study of impacts often requires data about people's experiences of legal processes.

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  • The Logic of Terror

    Hokowhitu, Brendan (2008)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Permission kindly granted to reproduce this chapter from Huia Publishers.

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  • Kant, Skepticism, and the Comparison Argument

    Vanzo, Alberto (2010)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Kant's writings on logic illustrate the comparison argument about truth, which goes as follows. A truth-bearer p is true if and only if it corresponds, or it agrees, with a portion of reality: the object(s), state(s) of affairs, or event(s) p is about. In order to know whether p agrees with that portion of reality, one must check if that portion of reality is as p states. Using the terms of the comparison argument, one must compare p with that portion of reality. This is impossible, because the only knowledge of reality we can have is in the form propositions, beliefs, or judgments, whose agreement with reality is as much in need of justification as the agreement of p with reality. Therefore, it is impossible to know which truth-bearers are true. In this paper, I reconstruct Kant's version of the comparison argument. I argue that, for Kant, the argument is sound only under the assumption of transcendental realism. Transcendental idealism avoids the sceptical consequences of the comparison argument.

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  • Credit Union Otago: Prospering in a competitive environment

    Sibbald, Alexander (2002)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    This case study presents an opportunity to identify and discuss operational management stratagies pursued by Credit Union Otago in particular, and the credit union industry in general, in their bid to survive and grow whilst aiming to achieve both economic and social objectives.

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  • Scalability of techniques for online geographic visualization of Web site hits

    Stanger, Nigel (2008)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Extremely large data sets are now commonplace, and they are often visualized through the World Wide Web. Scalability of web-based visualization techniques is thus a key issue. This paper investigates the scalability of four representative techniques for dynamic map generation and display (e.g., for visualizing geographic sources of web site hits): generating a single composite map image, overlaying images on an underlying base map and two variants of overlaying HTML on a base map. These four techniques embody a mixture of different display technologies and distribution styles (three server-side and one distributed across both client and server). Each technique was applied to 20 synthetic data sets of increasing size, and the data set volume, elapsed time and memory consumption were measured. The results show that all four techniques are suitable for small data sets comprising a few thousand points, but that the two HTML techniques scale to larger data sets very poorly across all three variables.

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  • Practice and Performance as Research in the Arts

    (2011)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Peer Reviewed

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  • Revisioning the Pacific: Bernard Smith in the South Seas

    Ryan, Tom (2005)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    BORN IN Sydney in 1986, Bernard Smith is today widely considered to be Australia's preeminent art historian and a major cultural theorist.¹ While working as a school teacher and artist during the late 1930S and early 1940s, he came under the influences of surrealist aesthetics and communist politics, especially as mediated by refugee intellectuals from Hitler's Europe. During this period his principal literary inspirations were the Bible, Marx, and Toynbee; it was their different takes on history, especially of its unfolding over long durations, that most impressed him.² As an academic and writer through the next half century, Smith produced numerous historically oriented studies of Australian and modernist art, which broadly can be divided into two periods of publishing activity.³ His most acclaimed achievement, however, is European Vision and the South Pacific 1768-1850: A Study in the History of Art and Ideas, first published in 1960 and a work that has continued to grow in stature and influence in the four decades since its original appearance. It is the history of this text, and of its companion-piece, Imagining the Pacific: In the Wake of the Cook Voyages, published in 1992, and the contexts in which they were produced and have been consumed, that are the main concerns of the present essay.⁴

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  • Implementation considerations in supervisory control

    Malik, Robi; Dietrich, Petra; Wonham, W. M.; Brandin, Bertil A. (2001-06)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    With supervisory control theory it is possible to describe controllers which influence the behaviour of a system by disabling controllable events. But sometimes it is desirable to have a controller which not only disables controllable events but also chooses one among the enabled ones. This event can be interpreted as a command given to the plant. This idea is formalized in the concept of an implementation, which is a special supervisor, enabling at most one controllable event at a time. In this paper, some useful properties are introduced, which ensure, when met, that each implementation of a given DES is nonblocking. The approach is applied to a simple chemical batch process example.

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  • From assimilation to biculturalism: Changing patterns in Maori-Pakeha relationships

    Thomas, David R.; Nikora, Linda Waimarie (1996)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    This chapter examines the changing patterns of inter-ethnic relationships among Maori and Pakeha in New Zealand, specifically the moves from assimilation towards biculturalism. The impact of recent debate about the Treaty of Waitangi is described and examples of bicultural policies and their consequences are outlined.

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  • Researching Identities: Impact of the Performance-Base Research Fund on the Subject(s) of Education

    Middleton, Sue (2006)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    My argument begins by introducing key conceptual tools, applying them to the formative years of Education as a university subject. Second, I sketch a brief history of the subject in New Zealand in the 1980s and 1990s, emphasising its contradictory mandates as both academic and professional/clinical discipline. Third, I explore interviewees’ experiences and perspectives during and immediately after the quality evaluation process (Middleton, 2005a). The conclusion suggests ways the evaluation model might change to support (not penalise) Education’s dual mandate to enhance research capacity and outputs and to produce good practitioners for the teaching professions.

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  • Gravel galore: Impacts of clear-cut logging on salmon and their habitats

    Hicks, Brendan J. (2002)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Timber harvest may have both direct and indirect effects on salmon, and with a few exceptions those effects result in lowered survival of salmon in their stream habitats compared with unlogged forest (Hicks et al. 1991b). Some impacts may be seen immediately or shortly after logging, whereas others can take decades to be expressed. Central to analyzing these effects is the context of the freshwater environment in which salmon are spawned and reared, and the life histories of the salmon species. This chapter will examine the effects of timber harvest on the freshwater habitat and life stages of salmon. It will also investigate the hypothesis that the salmon species least affected by timber harvest are those with the least reliance on stream habitats.

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