1,693 results for Book item

  • Sensation and perception

    Perrone, John A. (2007)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    One of the oldest and most difficult questions in science is how we are able to develop an awareness of the world around us from our senses. Topics covered under the title of, 'Sensation and perception' address this very question. Sensation encompasses the processes by which our sense organs (e.g. eyes, ears etc.) receive information from our environment, whereas perception refers to the processes through which the brain selects, integrates, organises and interprets those sensations. The sorts of questions dealt with by psychologists interested in this area include: 'how does visual information get processed by the brain?', 'how is it that I am able to recognise one face out of many many thousands?', and 'what causes visual illusions to occur?: Within New Zealand there are a number of researchers studying visual perception specifically and their research interests range from understanding the biological

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  • Teaching conversation and negotiation skills using teacher-made, semiscripted conversation models (New Zealand)

    Denny, H (2011-08-15)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    No abstracts in this publication.

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  • Brand equity and the value of marketing assets

    Brodie, RJ; Glynn, MS

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    In the last two decades the term ‘equity’ has been used in marketing to describe the value of brands, customers, channels, and other marketing relationships. We examine the alternative uses of the equity concept and how it links with financial thinking. The chapter then explores issues involved in developing a theory of marketing assets and value that integrates branding, relationship and network thinking with financial thinking.

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  • Creating Creative Technologists: playing with(in) education

    Walker, C; Connor, AM; Marks, S

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Since the industrial revolution, the organization of knowledge into distinct scientific, technical or creative categories has resulted in educational systems designed to produce and validate particular occupations. The methods by which students are exposed to different kinds of knowledge are critical in creating and reproducing individual, professional or cultural identities. (“I am an Engineer. You are an Artist”). The emergence of more open, creative and socialised technologies generates challenges for discipline-based education. At the same time, the term “Creative Technologies” also suggests a new occupational category (“I am a Creative Technologist”). This chapter presents a case-study of an evolving ‘anti-disciplinary’ project-based degree that challenges traditional degree structures to stimulate new forms of connective, imaginative and explorative learning, and to equip students to respond to a changing world. Learning is conceived as an emergent process; self-managed by students through critique and open peer review. We focus on ‘playfulness’ as a methodology for achieving multi-modal learning across the boundaries of art, design, computer science, engineering, games and entrepreneurship. In this new cultural moment, playfulness also re-frames the institutional identities of teacher and learner in response to new expectations for learning.

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  • Occupational science: the study of occupation

    Wright-St Clair, VA; Hocking, C (2011-10-16)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    This chapter explores how occupational science is informing occupational therapy practice. Firstly the discussion looks at occupational science as a basic science underpinning occupational therapy knowledge, before recent developments in occupational science are show-cased as a way of illustrating its growth as an applied science. Along the way, real world international examples are offered. Each highlights how the ‘science’ of occupational science is guiding evidence-based occupational therapy practice. Each example, in its own way, illustrates occupational science ‘in play’ within the everyday practice worlds of occupational therapists.

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  • "I my own professor": Ashton-Warner as New Zealand educational theorist, 1940-60.

    Middleton, Sue (2006)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    The invitation to contribute to this volume addressed me as a New Zealander who had written about how Sylvia Ashton-Warner's fantasies, theories, imagery, and life-history narratives threaded their way through my own. I had written of my youthful encounters with her work in Educating Feminists (Middleton 1993), in which I looked back on reading Spinster in 1960 at age thirteen and reflected on my teenage dreams of life as an artist and beatnik in Parisian cafes and garrets: confined to an Edwardian boarding school hostel in a provincial New Zealand town, I had plotted my escape to what Ashton-Warner described in Myself as "some bohemian studio on the Left Bank in Paris or over a bowl of wine in Italy, me all sophisticated and that, with dozens of lovers, paint everywhere and love and communion and sympathy and all that" (Myself, 212). When, in the early 1970s, I began secondary school teaching and read Teacher, that book built bridges between the frightening urgency of classroom survival, the enticing theories but alien classrooms described by American deschoolers and free-schoolers, and "what I believed myself to be when a girl on the long long road to school, a vagabond and an artist" (I Passed This Way, 307). As a young teacher I, too, had poured my impassioned soul into writing journals and poetry, painting, and playing the piano. Like Ashton-Warner, I had hoped that artistic self-expression could keep the mad woman in my attic at bay, for "asylums are full of artists who failed to say the things they must and famous tombs are full of those who did" (Incense to Idols, 169).

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  • Maximizing the good and minimizing the bad: relationships in organizations

    Cooper-Thomas, HD; Morrison, R (2013-11-28)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    In this chapter we introduce the complexities of relationships in organizations, and outline why they are important to study. We discuss the main themes of this book providing a brief overview of the chapters and making links between them. The chapters canvas a wide range of organizational relationships, both positive and fruitful, and dysfunctional and damaging.

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  • The contructivist paradigm and some implications for science content and pedagogy

    Carr, Malcolm; Barker, Miles; Bell, Beverley; Biddulph, Fred; Jones, Alister; Kirkwood, Valda; Pearson, John; Symington, David (1997)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Through a comparison of the widely-held traditional view of science with the constructivist view of science, we argue that the constructivist view of the content of science has important implications for classroom teaching and learning. This alternative view of science concepts as human constructs, scrutinised by application of the rules of the game of science, raises many challenges for teachers. Reconceptualisation of teachers' views of the nature of science and of learning in science is important for a constructivist pedagogy. We argue here that open discussion of the 'rules of the game' of science would contribute to better learning in the classroom, since learners would be better equipped to change their existing concepts by knowing more about the nature of science itself.

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  • The case for multiple research methodologies

    Wright-St Clair, VA (2011-10-14)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

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  • Social innovation through employing design actualization

    Thomassen, A (2011-12-07)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Recent publications show a relation between design, innovation and empowerment, in particular for the more digital literate people that participate in global networks. This paper investigates whether and how governments can support good design; what would a good national design policy look like; and what ought the priorities of such a policy be? The research shown in this paper aims to understand the empowerment of design and its means for social innovation. And in particular how governments can support this enabling process. Expected outcomes of this research are discussing current international governmental initiatives that will (hopefully) eventual lead to enabling social design innovation on governmental level.

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  • Personality, affect, and organizational change: a qualitative study

    Smollan, RK; Matheny, J; Sayers, JG (2011-12-12)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Published studies of the relationships between personality, affect, and organizational change have been overwhelmingly quantitative, while clinical and psychodynamic approaches have seldom dealt with the context of organizational change. We used semistructured interviews to explore the “middle ground”, by researching how participants in change believed aspects of their personalities contributed to their responses, particularly on an affective level. We found that traits such as openness to experience, resilience, pragmatism, change self-efficacy, and locus of control influenced participants' perceptions of how they reacted to organizational change. The findings point to the important role that qualitative research into personality can play in improving understanding of emotional responses to organizational change.

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  • Collaboration and development of radio astronomy in Australasia and South-Pacific region: New Zealand perspectives

    Gulyaev, S; Natusch, T (2011-12-16)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    As a result of collective efforts of an Australian–New Zealand VLBI team, the first New Zealand VLBI system was developed, and a series of test observations between New Zealand and Australia conducted. The equipment and techniques used to conduct New Zealand's first VLBI observations are discussed and results of work in Australia and New Zealand to obtain fringes and the image of the source (PKS1921-231) are presented. The road map for New Zealand radio-astronomy as well as New Zealand involvement in the SKA is discussed.

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  • The 10 Predicaments of Maui. Notes on Tricksters

    Robertson, N (2011-12-01)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    A 7000 word essay The 10 Predicaments of Maui.Notes on Tricksters. A response to the Francis Alys exhibition (to be continued) 1992- at Artspace, Auckland 2005 on the role of the Trickster and contemporary art.

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  • 'Occupational Health and Safety'

    Lamm, F (2011-12-09)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Objectives • To overview theories and principles behind health and safety and accident compensation changes; • To present health and safety and accident compensation legislation; • To identify the shifts between regulatory and self-regulatory approaches; • To indicate the issues being addressed by current public policy debates.

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  • Scientific workflow management with ADAMS

    Reutemann, Peter; Vanschoren, Joaquin (2012)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    We demonstrate the Advanced Data mining And Machine learning System (ADAMS), a novel workflow engine designed for rapid prototyping and maintenance of complex knowledge workflows. ADAMS does not require the user to manually connect inputs to outputs on a large canvas. It uses a compact workflow representation, control operators, and a simple interface between operators, allowing them to be auto-connected. It contains an extensive library of operators for various types of analysis, and a convenient plug-in architecture to easily add new ones.

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  • Mental health and legal landscapes

    Campion, Michelle Edith (2012)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    When it was established early in the twentieth century, Tokanui became part of a network of mental hospitals that were responsible for the care and confinement of the insane and the mentally deficient. At the time of its construction Tokanui was the first new mental hospital commissioned in over 20 years and the first to be built in the central North Island. Of those mental hospitals operating in 1912 all, except Ashburn Hall (the country's only private institution), were government controlled and funded. State dominance in the management of mental abnormality was the result of an unofficial policy which followed English precedent, favouring government intervention in the belief that it produced beneficial results and which endorsed the conviction that government responsibility for such matters could not be divested to a third party. This position was strengthened by the paucity of a prosperous philanthropic class who would otherwise have bridged the gulf between demand and supply under the auspices of charity. The essence of this philosophy was reflected in the early nineteenth and twentieth-century legislation which governed the development and management of New Zealand's mental hospitals.

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  • An introduction to ethical consideration in international environmental law

    Gillespie, Alexander (2010)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    The purpose of this chapter is to give the reader an overview of where some of the ethical debates in international environmental law are currently found. This chapter builds upon my earlier work in this area, which is contained in “International Environmental Law, Policy and Ethics”.

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  • Pulsed boundary layer flow versus tide-driven deep pore-water flow--What drives sulfide vents in oceanic mangrove peat habitats?

    Vopel, K; Roy, H (2011-07-14)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

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  • Rapid biofunctionalization of magnetic beads with function-spacer-lipid constructs

    Henry, SM

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    KODE™ Technology is based on novel water-dispersible self-assembling molecules, called a functionspacer- lipids or KODE™ constructs (Figure 1) that are able to coat virtually any biological or non-biological surface with almost any biological or non-biological material [1-10]. The primary coating method of live cells, organisms, bacteria and viruses or solid surfaces (glass, metals, plastics, etc.) is achieved by simple contact with a solution containing one or more FSL KODE™ constructs. Upon contact the FSLs spontaneously and harmlessly create a stable and novel surface coating. Essentially the spontaneous self-assembling process is driven by the need of the constructs to “exclude water”. Because the constructs are able to bind to virtually any surface, be it hydrophobic or hydrophilic the mechanisms of action are multiple and complex and include hydrophobic interactions (via lipid tail), hydrophilic interactions (via the head group and spacer), micelle entrapment, encapsulation, bi/multi layer assembly, and other factors such as hydrogen bonding, van der Waals forces, electrostatic and ionic interactions and combinations of all the above on complex surfaces. To-date a large range of peptides, simple and complex carbohydrates (including sialic acids and hyaluronin), peptides, fluorescent markers, reactive functional groups, biotin (Figure 1), oligonucleotides,radiolabels, chelators, and other functional moieties have been created as FSL constructs [1-10]. The key advantages of KODE™ Technology over other conjugation techniques are that it allows the user to create bespoke novel surfaces on demand, and it can also harmlessly modify live cells to facilitate their attachment to beads. Because multiple different FSL constructs can be added simultaneously to a bead, and in a controlled manner (by simply altering relative concentrations of FSLs in the mix), users can build on the surface of the bead a variety of complex multi-ligand biofunctional surfaces. Furthermore, the technology is compatible with existing functionalized beads and would allow users to add further features, such as fluorescent labels, or other enhancing or blocking components.

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  • The Brawn-Drain? Issues for the professional sports worker

    Sayers, Janet; Edwards, Margot (2004)

    Book item
    Massey University

    Professionalism is now the reality in many sports. For the professional sportsperson (most professional sports are male), there are several challenges and issues that make them a 'special' type of worker. We explore three of the challenges of the sports professional: the short-term nature of the career and its implications which includes living with injury and the fear of life after a sports career; second, the 'brawn drain'; and third, the celebrity status of athletes.

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