1,684 results for Book item

  • Successful writing

    Kavan, Heather (2005)

    Book item
    Massey University

    No abstract

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  • The state in action: an insider’s view of how the state regulates the use of PGD with HLA tissue-typing in New Zealand

    Henaghan, Mark; Cleary, Thomas (2013)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    In New Zealand the choice by intending parents to use reproductive technology is limited by legislation. This default restriction on the prospective parents’ procreative autonomy applies unless the use of the assisted reproductive procedure has been approved on the basis of guidelines or regulations. The task of creating these guidelines falls to a non-governmental advisory committee, the Advisory Committee on Assisted Reproductive Technology (ACART). This advisory committee is supposedly unconstrained by political considerations and, in theory, provides a forum for deliberative discussions on the ethical and social disagreements that surround the use of assisted reproductive technologies. This chapter provides an analysis, from the perspective of a member of ACART, of how the advisory committee functions in reality. It focuses specifically on the developments of guidelines controlling the use of pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) tissue-typing, more commonly referred to as creating ‘saviour siblings’.

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  • International child abduction, intercountry adoption and international commercial surrogacy

    Henaghan, Mark; Ballantyne, Ruth (2014)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    The significance and complexities of both international child abduction and intercountry adoption led to the creation of two Hague Conventions. This chapter analyses the policy challenges facing the international aspects of The Hague Convention of 25 October 1980 on the Civil Aspects of International aspects of Child Abduction (the Abduction Convention) and The Hague Convention of 29 may 1993 on the Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption (the Adoption Convention). Policy challenges for the Abduction Convention include the changing profile of the 'abducting parent'; domestic violence and the 'grave risk' exception; the 'child objection' exception; international interpretation inconsistencies; and the problem of non-signatory countries. Policy challenges faced by the Adoption Convention include the socio-economic realities of intercountry adoption and the resulting power imbalances; cultural and political differences; the difficulties of deciding what is in the best interests of children; problems of interpretation, implementation and enforcement; and the growing preference for international commercial surrogacy as a replacement for intercountry adoption. These policy issues highlight the need for these international conventions to constantly adapt and improve to meet the realities of international child abduction and intercountry adoption.

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  • Position and direction finding for exploration and mapping

    Goodwin, David (2013)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Peer Reviewed

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  • Land Tenure: The Wide View

    Goodwin, David (2013)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Peer Reviewed

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  • The meaning of significance in data testing

    Perezgonzalez, JD (2016-11-11)

    Book item
    Massey University

    false

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  • Grandparents who Care for Grandchildren

    Henaghan, Mark (2014)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Both in New Zealand and abroad, a social trend is emerging of grandparents taking on the responsibility of parenting their grandchildren. This chapter examines the different ways in which grandparents can come to be legally involved in their grandchildren’s lives and their position under New Zealand’s legislative and common law regimes. By way of contrast, the somewhat different position of grandparents in the United States is analysed with reference to the United States Supreme Court decision of Troxel v Granville. The chapter also discusses the fundamental importance of children’s voices and concludes with an examination of the practical support available to grandparents who find themselves raising their grandchildren.

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  • Neuroscience and the Law in New Zealand

    Henaghan, Mark; Rouch, Kate (2012)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    The New Zealand Court of Appeal has rejected evidence of neuroimaging to help juries assess the capacity of the accused in an insanity plea. This chapter says the Court of Appeal was right to do so because neuroimaging should not replace the role of the jury. The chapter explains; that neuroscience will help us better understand how the brain functions and what relationship there is between that functioning and how we make decisions. The chapter concludes that neuroscience will be helpful for insight into the human condition but cannot replace the moral choices of what we think is right or wrong or whether we should be culpable or should not be.

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  • A framework for product development

    McAloone, TC; Robotham, AJ (2014-01-07)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Since the introduction of Integrated Product development in 1985, industry has widely been using this model to understand and articulate their design, business and production activities. Recently, however, the picture has started to alter, as the nature of industry’s business has had to adapt to a much more complex world and in many cases, Integrated Product Development is no longer a sufficient way of describing industry’s product development activity. This paper uses the model of Integrated Product Development as a start-point to exploring the changes that industry has been undergoing over the fifteen years since it was introduced and attempts to make pointers in the direction of a new framework for product development, which should guide industry in the future. The key research challenges that this paper identifies include: developing a framework that identifies and supports a multi-aspect approach to product development; understanding the strategic conditions that affect product development; developing a coherent approach to product quality based on product-life thinking; addressing environmental needs in a proactive manner through innovation techniques; and understanding both organisational and technical knowledge-management for improved product development

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  • Appendix A: Maps showing the distributions of lakes in New Zealand and their grouping into distinct districts reflecting the predominance of particular geological processes

    Green, John D.; Lowe, David J. (1987-01-01)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    The large-scale maps of each of the lake districts show lakes with a maximum dimension ≥ c0.5 km.

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  • Science education in context: An overview and some observations

    Coll, Richard K.; Taylor, Neil (2008)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    This book presents an international perspective of the influence of educational context on science education. By this we mean the context in which the teaching and learning takes place, rather than the use of a context-based approach to learning and teaching (Pilot & Bulte, 2006). The focus is on the interactions between curriculum development and implementation in non-Western and non- English-speaking contexts (i.e., outside the UK, USA, Australia, NZ, etc.).

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  • Arnold Manaaki Wilson: Te Awakaunua

    Te Awekotuku, Ngahuia (2008)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Arnold Manaaki Wilson was born in 1928, in Ruatoki, a community which nestles beneath the misty Taiarahia hills, following the curves of the Ohinemataroa river valley – known to others as of his tuhoe people. They know him there as Te Wakaunua, after a provocative late 19th century political visionary. From Such radical Tuhoe ideas fused with the sculptural genius of his father, a renowned carver of the art-making Ngati Tarawhai of Te Arawa, Arnold Wilson emerged.

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  • Appendix B: Some morphometric parameters of named lakes with areas [greater than or equal to] 1.0 km2, and some smaller lakes, in New Zealand

    Lowe, David J.; Green, John D. (1987-01-01)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Gaps indicate uncertainty or that accurate data are unavailable. Note that lakes with fluctuating levels e.g., those used for hydro-electric purposes, or near coasts have varying parameters. Table based mainly on Irwin (1975) with some data from Cunningham et al. (1953), Irwin (1972), Jolly & Brown (1975), Irwin & Pickrill (1983), Howard-Williams & Vincent 1984, Boswell et al. (1985), Livingstone et al. (1986), N.Z.O.I. Lake Chart series, N.Z. Topographical Map Series NZMS1 (1:63 360) and NZMS26O (1:50 000), and other sources.

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  • Final thoughts

    Barnard, Roger; Burns, Anne (2012)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    In our introduction to this volume, we pointed out that many academic journals do not have enough space to enable the authors of empirical studies to discuss important methodological details of their projects.

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  • Modes of representation in contemporary Galician visual poetry

    Lopez-Fernandez, Laura (2011)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Visual poetry in Galicia had a plural and discontinuous existence in the twentieth century'! Its development in Galicia follows national (Spanish) and international artistic practices, while also engaging in the configuration of a local, national, and transnational Galician identity. The practice of different styles of visual poetry shows a rich line of creativity, especially in the last four decades. Their approaches coincide with sociocultural and economic changes in Spain, such as the end of the dictatorship in 1975, the consequent normalization of the Galician language, and more recently the progressive influence of globalization. This essay considers how current Galician visual poets reconceptualize these issues in the context of an international cultural and visual aesthetics.

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  • On not knowing one’s place

    Goldsmith, Michael (2000)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Ethnographers have described many cultural worlds of the Pacific with subtlety and energy, but those worlds were and are always more complex than most standard forms of ethnography have recognized. The ASAO model for the presentation of expertise, while an impressive vehicle for demonstrating ethnographic skills and thoroughness, has yet to reform the accepted boundaries of the discipline or the tradition of Pacific societies seen as "social wholes." It has depended on a division of labor that allocates theory and field-work to different roles, it has recognized ethnographic authority as accruing to those with a concretely territorial claim to represent others, and it has encour-aged a static, monocultural sense of its audiences. I hasten to add that ASAO is not unique in this regard; these strictures apply to academic anthropology in general. Moreover, change is always possible as ethnographers strive to reinvent their discipline beyond the boundaries of the possible. But the historically closed and compartmentalized nature of academic knowledge means that challenges to its perceptual boundaries tend to result from the serendipitous recognition of moments where one does not "know one's place."

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  • Mental health at Tokanui in the early years

    Campion, Michelle Edith; Coleborne, Catharine; Prebble, Kate (2012)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Tokanui was the first hospital to be built entirely to the villa design, and as such, its physically separate wards presented considerable opportunity for the classification and treatment of patients. Piecing together information contained in the remaining records, this chapter describes the formative years at Tokanui, during which not only a hospital, but also a community was established. The narrative which follows tells of buildings erected, land broken, cultivated and beautified, of hard physical labour and trying conditions. Above all, it is a narrative of the people who worked and lived, however fleetingly, at Tokanui and without whom the hospital would not have had a purpose. As the first new hospital to be built after provincial time, Tokanui, in many respects, led the way in developments made in the accommodation and treatment of the psychiatrically ill and those with intellectual disability.

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  • A continuum model for the dynamics of the phase transition from slow-wave sleep to REM sleep

    Sleigh, James W.; Wilson, Marcus T.; Voss, Logan J.; Steyn-Ross, D. Alistair; Steyn-Ross, Moira L.; Li, Xiaoli (2010)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Previous studies have shown that activated cortical states (awake and rapid eye-movement (REM) sleep), are associated with increased cholinergic input into the cerebral cortex. However, the mechanisms that underlie the detailed dynamics of the cortical transition from slow-wave to REM sleep have not been quantitatively modeled. How does the sequence of abrupt changes in the cortical dynamics (as detected in the electrocorticogram) result from the more gradual change in subcortical cholinergic input? We compare the output from a continuum model of cortical neuronal dynamics with experimentally-derived rat electrocorticogram data. The output from the computer model was consistent with experimental observations. In slow-wave sleep, 0.5–2-Hz oscillations arise from the cortex jumping between “up” and “down” states on the stationary-state manifold. As cholinergic input increases, the upper state undergoes a bifurcation to an 8-Hz oscillation. The coexistence of both oscillations is similar to that found in the intermediate stage of sleep of the rat. Further cholinergic input moves the trajectory to a point where the lower part of the manifold in not available, and thus the slow oscillation abruptly ceases (REM sleep). The model provides a natural basis to explain neuromodulator-induced changes in cortical activity, and indicates that a cortical phase change, rather than a brainstem “flip-flop”, may describe the transition from slow-wave sleep to REM.

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  • Patient journeys: Stories of mental health care from Tokanui to mental health services, 1930s to the 1980s

    Coleborne, Catharine (2012)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    This chapter is concerned with finding out about mental health patients - taking this term at the outset - and exploring how their stories might be found in different places from 1912. It considers, then, the shifting identities of patients over time, as well as exploring issues around how historians might productively locate stories and narratives of mental illness, hospitalisation, recovery, and sometimes, cycles of these. Overall, it situates Tokanui patients in a wider framework for mental health histories in New Zealand and seeks to find their stories among the many accounts of mental illness. Where the previous chapter considered changing modalities for treatment, and told patient stories sensitively to capture this from the perspective of a practising psychiatrist, this chapter is written from the point of patients, but also mediated by the view of the historian. It therefore asks readers to think about the ways we tell stories of mental health, as much as about the stories themselves.

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  • Why case study research? Introduction to the field guide to case study research in tourism, hospitality, and leisure

    Hyde, Kenneth F.; Ryan, Chris; Woodside, Arch G. (2012)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    This chapter is a general introduction to the field of case study research in tourism, hospitality, and leisure. The chapter presents a brief review of the literature on the intra-individual logic of case study research. The chapter describes the “four horsemen” for doing case study research: accuracy, generality, complexity/coverage, and value/impact. Examples in the chapter that illustrate this perspective for undertaking case study research may impassion the reader to read through the field guide and personally engage in case study research – at least that is the hope of the editors of this field guide.

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