1,684 results for Book item

  • Alimentação e Nutrição de Povos Indígenas Brasileiros

    de Castro, TG; da Silva Mazzeti, CM; Mazzucchetti, L; Gimeno, SGA (2014)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Postcolonial security, development and biopolitics: targeting women’s lives in Solomon Islands

    Lacey, Anita (2016-01-28)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Improving the safety of pediatric sedation? Human error, technology, and clinical microsystems

    Webster, Craig; Anderson, Brian; Stabile, MJ; Merry, Alan (2015)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Recent years have seen significant improvements in the safety of a number of areas of health care. However, evidence would suggest that the practice of pediatric sedation outside of the operating room is an area where unaddressed complexities and risks in care remain. In addition, the number of children receiving sedation outside of the operating room is on the increase, emphasizing the need to realize opportunities to improve safety. We outline the risks inherent in sedating children in the context of both the human factors and system factors perspectives. We incorporate examples from other high-technology industries such as aviation and nuclear power generation to allow a better understanding of why things go wrong during sedation. The value of prior risk assessment, communication, checklists, and formalized recovery pathways are discussed, and new directions for the development of safety initiatives are identified. Finally a number of practical steps based on existing successful safety approaches are given, with an emphasis on the demonstration of efficacy and the sharing of successful safety solutions.

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  • Total Synthesis of the Fungal Metabolite Virgatolide B

    Hume, Paul; Furkert, Daniel; Brimble, Margaret (2015)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This account describes the total synthesis of the title compound, a polyketide metabolite with in vitro antitumor activity. A first-generation approach involving an sp3–sp2 Suzuki cross-coupling reaction of a chiral trifluoroboratoamide and a rotationally symmetric aryl bromide successfully established the carbon framework required to construct the spiroketal core of the molecule. However, removal of the phenolic protecting groups with concomitant spiroketalization could not be achieved. A revised strategy was therefore devised, employing different protecting groups and incorporating greater functionality on the aryl bromide coupling partner. Suzuki cross-coupling, extension of the carbon backbone using a diastereoselective Mukaiyama aldol reaction and deprotection/cyclization furnished the spiroketal ring system. The final transformation required was carboalkoxylation of the aromatic ring to form the phthalide subunit present in the molecule. This manipulation was difficult to achieve due to competing protodehalogenation. Finally, a reordering of synthetic events provided access to virgatolide B by exploitation of an intramolecular hydrogen-bonding interaction in order to control the regioselectivity of the spiroketalization process.

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  • What can reverse mentoring models contribute to communities of practice involving developed and rising economies?

    Dunham, Annette; Ross, M (2016)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Communities of practice have been proposed as effective means of building cooperative knowledge sharing relationships between locals and experts from emerging and developed economies (including divisions within some multinational companies). Mentoring relationships in general have been found to support the work of communities of practice. Reverse mentoring relationships are the reverse to what is traditionally expected of a mentoring relationship; they involve the mentoring of a mature or more experienced employee by a younger or generally less experienced employee, but also have the potential to offer much to communities of practice. In the context of communities of practice involving developed and emerging economies, reverse mentoring relationships have the potential to facilitate nationals' (the reverse mentors) sharing of local knowledge while at the same time providing them with leadership development courtesy of the developed country's representative(s) (the reverse mentee(s)), a winning solution for communities of practice and multinational companies. This chapter outlines the benefits of reverse mentoring relationships for communities of practice, and identifies some potential challenges for these partnerships. The implications of these for managers and practitioners are outlined. An agenda for research into reverse mentoring arrangements will complete this chapter. The aim of the chapter is to show how reverse mentoring relationships can complement the work of communities of practice in fostering co-operative knowledge sharing between those in developed and emerging economies.

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  • Fathers and sons: An autoethnographic performance of trauma, bereavement, and transformation

    Bray, Peter; Bray, O (2013)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Just before Sam died, his son Peter travelled from his home in Hawke’s Bay, New Zealand, to conduct some preliminary research with his son Oliver who lives in Leeds, Great Britain. With Peter’s interests in loss, post-traumatic growth and transpersonal experiences and Oliver’s in theatre making, performance and pedagogy they began to discover that they share much common ground. Shortly after their time together Peter travelled to Moscow to deliver a paper on Hamlet. What follows is a weaving of the thoughts and recollections of three generations of men touched by loss, trauma and grief. First presented in 2011 in Prague, the Czech Republic, this text was originally conceived as a palliative response to Sam’s death in England a year earlier. In this new text we allow our curiosity to continue exploring those traumatic wounds that have had, for better or for worse, such a significant impact upon our lives as a father and a son. In expressing some of our loss experiences we begin to understand that our lives, people’s lives, far from the normal, predictable and humdrum are essentially and powerfully unique. Bearing and baring the scars of life’s seemingly random and unconscionable wounding, the legacy of lives fully lived, we share the paradox of these unwanted but necessary losses. We discover that traumatic events are significant opportunities for individuals to start again, to re-assemble and re-learn their lives, make important changes, and take on the challenge of a world that has fundamentally changed, become less predictable and comfortable, and more difficult to manage. Key Words: Autoethnography, consciousness, father, ghost, grief, loss, performance, son, transpersonal, trauma.

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  • SLA of Mandarin nominal syntax: Emergence order in the early stages

    Charters, Areta (2013)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    The paper demonstrates that principles of universal grammar developed with reference to a number of typologically distinct languages can be applied effectively to account for acquisition order of nominal structures in Mandarin, an isolating Sinitic language. It is argued that an acquisition theory based on notions of universal grammar can effectively account for observed emergence order of nominal structures in the spontaneous speech of second language learners of Mandarin. Particular attention must be paid to developments in word order and collocation constraints, and the syntactic relationships they encode, rather than to the morphological changes that typically mark development in inflectional languages.

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  • Planning with high expectations

    Rubie-Davies, CM; McDonald, Lynette; Flint, Annaline (2016)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Smashing Eggs; on the ironic pleasures of mangling in artistic research

    Longley, Alys (2015-10-01)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Smashing Eggs reflects on a classic irony – where you destroy the thing you intend to care for, where love and destruction, friendship and cruelty, creativity and control fluidly substitute each other. It seems that artistic research might be prone to such quirks of substitution – potentially demanding forms of surveillance, regulation, report and writing that actually prevent many forms of artistic practice. This chapter engages with philosopher and scientist Andrew Pickering’s concept of the mangle of practice as a way to frame and better understand the complex and often contradictory processes of knowledge production in artistic research. I will discuss strategies to actively engage with the mangle as an inevitable, unpredictable and often ironic force in artistic research.

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  • Funds of knowledge

    Hedges, Helen (2016)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Sociocultural theories explain ways that humans participate intently in informal family, community, and cultural activities and practices; learn naturally through these; and construct multiple identities. Diversity of, and within, families and cultures is now a global theme. Adopting culturally sensitive and equitable approaches and constructs to guide the education of children from diverse backgrounds is therefore vital. Funds of knowledge is an empowering construct developed as an early example of culturally responsive pedagogy. Previously, responses to educational achievement lags by ethnic minority children had taken on a deficit approach based on an assumption that the poor quality of these children’s home experiences meant they were not able to manage the demands of academic learning. Instead, funds of knowledge approaches explore the rich knowledge and lived experiences of families and cultures that can be drawn on in educational settings to enhance learning. It is therefore a concept of potential value to early childhood education where partnerships between families and educators are strongly promoted. The concept is dynamic, as it changes with each relationship in each family and evolves to new circumstances and cultures. Funds of knowledge can be considered as a theoretical, methodological, and pedagogical tool.

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  • Treatment of Paget's Disease of Bone

    Reid, Ian (2016)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Paget's disease involves overactivity of both osteoblasts and osteoclasts within affected bone tissue. It is unclear in which cells the causative lesion resides, but therapies have generally been antiosteoclastic (antiresorptive) because these are the only pharmaceuticals that have been available. There is tight coupling between osteoblasts and osteoclasts, so antiresorptive therapies lead to decreases in osteoclast activity within days, followed by similar declines in osteoblast activity after a period of 2-3 months. The most commonly used test for monitoring disease activity is serum total alkaline phosphatase, which is a measure of osteoblast activity, though serum procollagen type I N-terminal propeptide is more bone-specific. The treatment of Paget's disease is now virtually always with a potent bisphosphonate, typically intravenous zoledronate since this has the highest rates of biochemical response and the greatest response longevity.

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  • Directors as Agents–Some Aspects of Disputed Territory

    Watts, Peter (2016-01-28)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    The main question addressed in this chapter is whether, in relation to the operation of general private law, company directors are agents. The chapter then turns to some more specific aspects of the application of private law questions to directors.

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  • Pasifika R 'n' B Divas: gender, culture and Identity in Pacific pop music

    Zemke, Kirsten (2011-05)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    "Presents twenty different viewpoints on music in Aotearoa/New Zealand. A selection of experts examine the vast range of music production in this country and relate it to what it might say about our homeland, our diverse population, our landscape and our identities. The collection surveys traditional and popular music created by Maori and Pacific Islanders, distinctively Polynesian brands of reggae and hip hop, the music of migrants from such areas as Latin America, China, Japan and Greece, the electronic and instrumental music traditions made more local by Douglas Lilburn, the internationally recognised 'Dunedin sound' of the Flying Nun label, and the eccentric electroacoustic of 'outsider' musicians, revealing an ever-increasing diversity of music in New Zealand. Home, Land and Sea is the first comprehensive academic study incorporating contemporary popular, experimental and art music practices in New Zealand. Written for a tertiary audience it will be of relevance to scholars of a variety of disciplines including music; media and communications; cultural studies; sociology; anthropology and geography"--Back cover.

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  • Critical pedagogical strategies to disrupt weight bias in schools

    Pringle, Richard; Powell, Darren (2016)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Despite the scientific uncertainties concerning diet, body composition and health, many teachers believe that the world is in the grips of an “obesity epidemic” and it is their duty to promote the virtues of physical activity and the problems of fat. Although many of these teachers are well intended, concern has been raised that the simplistic messages promoted in schools can act to position fat people as unhealthy and even, at times, as moral failures. In this chapter, we begin by providing the results from an examination of two elementary schools that illustrate how children are taught about fatness and fitness and how they subsequently make simplistic and problematic understandings about bodies and health. Given our concerns about weight bias and the body composition/health messages circulating in schools, we reveal strategies employed in the education of teachers at a tertiary institute that aim to disrupt mainstream understandings of the relationships between fatness and health. We do so with the intent to promote a more respectful and nuanced way of teaching about bodies, fitness, physical activity, health, and fatness within schools.

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  • Creating cultures of integrity: A multilevel intervention model for promoting academic honesty

    Stephens, Jason (2016-01-01)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Educational settings should be contexts for individual and collective human thriving. One important way in which educational settings affect such thriving is through embedding students in a culture of integrity and involving them in its continuance. Unfortunately, such settings are rare, and the problem of academic dishonesty is long since “pidemic” (Haines et al., 1986). With this in mind, the purpose of the present chapter is to describe a multilevel model of intervention aimed at promoting academic honesty and creating a culture of integrity. Rooted in Cohen and Swift’ (1999) “spectrum of prevention” or other tiered approaches (Lane et al., 2009; Sugai and Horner, 2002), the intervention model presented here consists of three levels: school-wide education, context-specific prevention, and, where needed, individual remediation. Each level is described in detail and concrete examples are provided.

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  • Applications of Pelvic Floor Modeling and Simulation

    Kruger, Jennifer; Yan, X; Li, X; Nielsen, Poul; Nash, Martyn (2016)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This chapter introduces applications of pelvic floor modeling, significant advancements that have been made in the field, and the caveats that still need to be applied before implementing the models into clinical situations. Development of anatomically accurate 3-D pelvic floor models has added to our knowledge of normal and abnormal geometry of the muscles and is proving useful for educational purposes. Incorporating functionality into the models requires integration of anatomical structural information and constitutive modeling inputs, to investigate the mechanics of the pelvic floor, and this remains challenging. Nonetheless, with advancing technology and the improved ability to collect quantitative experimental data, these models are likely to be well informed and functional within the next decade.

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  • Hermeneutics in organization studies

    Myers, Michael (2016)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Hermeneutics is primarily concerned with human understanding: how it is possible for us to understand the meaning of a text. The word ‘text’ is interpreted broadly in contemporary hermeneutics and refers to written text, speech and any kind of human communication (which may be non-verbal). Hermeneutics can be described as both an underlying philosophy and as a specific way of analysing qualitative data (Bleicher, 1980). As a philosophical approach to human understanding, it provides one of the philosophical groundings for interpretivism (Klein and Myers, 1999). As a mode of analysis, it provides a set of concepts for analysing qualitative data in qualitative research projects.

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  • Sui Generis protection for sporting emblems and words: A triumph of pragmatism over principle

    Corbett, S; Sims, Alexandra (2016)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Editors' Introduction

    Inkson, James; Savickas, ML (2013)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    These four volumes bring together the best and most significant work in the career studies literature canon to date.

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  • Introduction: Careers in Context

    Inkson, James; Savickas, ML (2013)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    These four volumes bring together the best and most significant work in the career studies literature canon to date.

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