1,689 results for Book item

  • Teaching reading and viewing to L2 learners

    Zhang, Lawrence (2016)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Reading is a commonly offered course in many second and foreign language curricula for different age groups, yet it is not a skill easily acquired by students. Given the centrality of reading and viewing in real life and their importance in the curriculum for assisting the development of other language skills in students (e.g., speaking, listening, vocabulary, and writing), teachers’ instruction is crucial to student success. More importantly, in traditional reading lessons, teachers seldom consider blending reading into viewing and viewing into reading to make the lesson dynamic and interactive. Drawing on recent research, this chapter presents a framework for teachers to develop not only students’ language skills but also strategies for further skill development through reading and viewing. Such a framework takes an inclusive approach to instructional design, which brings to the fore theoretical perspectives on such instruction as well practical strategies for teaching reading and viewing. Strategies such as activating schemata, previewing, predicting, skimming, scanning, reading and linking, viewing (e.g., viewing digital materials on the computer screen), and connecting, using packaged instructional procedures such as D-R-T-A, K-W-L, among others, which are the bases of classroom instruction, are elaborated with reference to reading and viewing activities as an organic combination of extensive and intensive reading and viewing. Keywords: Theory of Reading; Teaching Reading and Viewing, Classroom-based Pedagogy; Language-teacher Education; Teaching Strategies;

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  • The role of the placenta in fetal programming

    Challis, J; Sloboda, D; Li, Shaofu; Braun, T; Bloomfield, Francis; Begum, G; White, A; Petraglia, F; Newnham, J (2014)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    The placenta occupies a critical place in fetal programming by modulating fetal responses to alterations in the maternal environment, by regulating transfer of nutrients between mother and fetus and by responding to changes in environmental stimuli that affect maternal and/or fetal physiology. Placental size and function are exquisitely sensitive to alterations in maternal nutrition, oxygen tension and exposure to glucocorticoids. These factors affect the activity of proteins such as the System A transporter that shuttles neutral amino acids to the fetus, the activity of cells such as those producing placental lactogen, a key metabolic hormone of pregnancy, and the generation of peptides such as the urocortins, members of the corticotrophin releasing hormone family with pro-and anti-inflammatory activities, and placental 11βhydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-2, which regulates placental metabolism of maternal cortisol. Maternal administration of exogenous synthetic glucocorticoid bypasses this metabolic barrier, programming reductions in fetal body weight and composition, and changing development of the fetal neurologic, pancreatic and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axes, leading to altered stress and inflammatory responses, cardiovascular activity and predisposition to insulin resistance in later life. Interestingly, many of these placental functions appear to be regulated in a manner that is dependent upon the sex of the fetus.

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  • Compulsory community mental health care. Oceania

    O'Brien, Anthony (2016)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • First Aid Courses for the Aquatic Environment

    Szpilman, D; Morizot-Leite, L; de Vries, W; Beerman, S; Martinho, FNR; Smoris, L; Løfgren, B; Webber, Jonathon (2014-10-26)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    First aid in the aquatic environment requires specific skills and knowledge that are not taught in regular first aid education. Some topics are unique to aquatics. Target groups for such courses include persons living, playing, or working near or around the water. First aid courses tailored for the aquatic environment contribute to a competent rescue and resuscitation of a drowning victim and to the safety of the lay rescuer [1] or trained rescuer [2]. By including information on water safety awareness, these courses can also contribute to prevention and reduce the drowning burden. The relevance of an aquatic course was first extensively debated at an expert meeting Do we need a special first aid course for drowning victims during the World Congress on Drowning in the Netherlands 2002. Since 2002, first aid courses for the aquatic environment have been successfully organized around the world. This chapter reviews the importance and need of these courses and what has been learned

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  • Valuation of Yoruba Sacred Shrines, Monuments, and Groves for Compensation

    Aluko, BT; Omisore, EO; Amidu, Abdul-Rasheed (2008-07-01)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    A sacred site is a place, which is considered holy and is partially or wholly reserved for magico – religious or ceremonial functions. Because of this, compensation valuation upon compulsory acquisition of these places is a complex and specialised one requiring the interpretation of law and our past cultural heritage. Consequently, the chapter, adopting a survey technique and simple descriptive statistics, examines sacred places, the provisions of the enabling compensation laws, the valuation process and the attendant problems in the assessment of compensation that fully equalled the pecuniary detriments faced by owners upon acquisition of these sites in the Yorubaland. This chapter reveals the conflicting provisions in the compensation enactments and the threat of the extinction of the role of traditional worshippers or priests, which is an outcome of the assessment of compensation of the places in the study area. In addition, based on empirical evidence of recent transactions on sacred places in the country the chapter concludes that compensation can hardly be adequate for sacred sites because of their social and cultural importance functions, although a review of the compensation laws, as well as training of curators of shrines and sacred places, may be necessary to ensure reliability of compensation valuation in the Yorubaland portion of Nigeria.

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  • Directors as Agents–Some Aspects of Disputed Territory

    Watts, Peter (2016-01-28)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    The main question addressed in this chapter is whether, in relation to the operation of general private law, company directors are agents. The chapter then turns to some more specific aspects of the application of private law questions to directors.

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  • Corporate governance and initial public offerings in China

    Chen, JJ; Gong, Xihe (2012-03-22)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    A major international study on corporate governance and Initial Public Offerings (IPOs) in twenty-one countries.

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  • Movement-Initiated Writing in Dance Ethnography

    Longley, Alys (2013-05-02)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    A central issue in contemporary dance ethnography is that of writing the somatic – the attempt to articulate kinesthetic, bodily sensations that emerge in a particular culture or context, within a research format (Ness, 2008; Sklar, 2000). Emerging methods including performance making and poetic, narrative, experimental, or performative writing create space for recognition of choreographic and sensory knowledges within ethnographic research. This chapter presents a case study that illustrates what I term “movement-initiated writing”: writing that emerges through dance making, wherein the dance ethnographer is a participant observer in studio practice. This emic approach attempts to translate the felt affects of a specific world of movement into performances sited in the terrains of pages. This mode of writing draws on Roland Barthes’ (1977) notion of the “grain of the voice,” Gilles Deleuze's concept of the “minor literature” (Deleuze & Guattari, 1987), Hélène Cixous’s examples of écriture feminine (Cixous, 1991), and the field of performance writing.

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  • Improvement and accountability functions of assessment: Impact on teachers' thinking and action

    Brown, Gavin (2016)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Social Entrepreneurship as an INGO: Exploring the Challenges of Innovation and Hybridisation

    Newth, Jamie (2017)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    International non-governmental organizations are an under-researched context in entrepreneurship studies given the level of resources they mobilize for social value creation and the strategic threats they are currently facing. Shepherd and Patzelt’s (2011) sustainable entrepreneurship framework outlines the entrepreneurship opportunities that these organizations have available as a response to shifting aid policies, evolving donor expectations, the rise of the social enterprise and impact investment, and the changing humanitarian development landscape. However, the established institutional logic of such organizations can inhibit their ability to pursue innovative social entrepreneurship initiatives. This chapter explores, via a long-term qualtitative investigation, the hybridization of a large INGO as it attempts such initiatives. The key findings are that the points of tension in effectively blending institutional logics – hybridizing – lay in the organization’s financial and institutional compliance, risk appetite, business model, value proposition, and governance. Contributions are made through the empirical application of Shepherd and Patzelt’s (2011) framework and its combination with the theory of institutional logics.

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  • Commercial signs in Oman and Yemen: A study of street advertising in English

    Buckingham, Louisa; Al-Athwary, A (2017-01)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The regulatory role of long noncoding RNAs in cancer drug resistance

    Askarian Amiri, Effat; Leung, Yee Fun; Finlay, Graeme; Baguley, Bruce (2016)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Recent genomic and transcriptomic analysis has revealed that the majority of the human genome is transcribed as nonprotein-coding RNA. These transcripts, known as long noncoding RNA, have structures similar to those of mRNA. Many of these transcripts are now thought to have regulatory roles in different biological pathways which provide cells with an additional layer of regulatory complexity in gene expression and proteome function in response to stimuli. A wide variety of cellular functions may thus depend on the fine-tuning of interactions between noncoding RNAs and other key molecules in cell signaling networks. Deregulation of many noncoding RNAs is thought to occur in a variety of human diseases, including neoplasia and cancer drug resistance. Here we discuss recent findings on the molecular functions of long noncoding RNAs in cellular pathways mediating resistance to anticancer drugs.

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  • Streptococcal Superantigens: Biological properties and potential role in disease

    Proft, Thomas; Fraser, John (2016)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Superantigens (SAgs) are a family of highly potent mitogens that share the ability to trigger excessive stimulation of human and other mammalian T lymphocytes. This leads to a massive release of T cell mediators and pro-inflammatory cytokines contributing to diseases such as toxic shock syndrome. In contrast to conventional peptides, SAgs bind as unprocessed molecules to major histocompatibility (MHC) class II molecules outside the peptide-binding groove and sequentially to the variable β-chain of the T cell receptor (TcRVβ). Currently, eleven Streptococcus pyogenes SAgs are described in the literature. Together with the SAgs produced by Staphylococcus aureus, they build a larger family of structurally related, heat-stable exotoxins. This chapter provides a comprehensive overview of the discovery, biological function, and disease-associations of these remarkable proteins.

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  • Dying in place in old age: public health challenges

    Cohen, J; Gott, M (2015)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Within the dominant palliative care discourse, it is assumed that dying ‘at home’ is preferred. An economically inspired discourse additionally posits that limiting hospital use at the end of life of older people can result in substantial and justifiable cost savings. The public health challenges related to place of dying include determining at what care settings end-of-life care resources, support, and strategies should be targeted, and developing general health care and specific end-of-life care policies with the potential to influence place of death patterns. By providing robust statistical descriptions of the place of death for older people across various countries and continents, this chapter addresses that challenge. However, the chapter also promotes an understanding of the context within which these statistics need to be interpreted and challenges some of the normative assumptions around the meanings of place, and the nature of choice of place, at the end of life.

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  • Hybrid Wavelet Neural Network Approach

    Shoaib, Muhammad; Shamseldin, Asaad; Melville, Bruce; Khan (2016)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Application of Wavelet transformation (WT) has been found effective in dealing with the issue of non-stationary data. WT is a mathematical tool that improves the performance of Artificial Neural Network (ANN) models by simultaneously considering both the spectral and the temporal information contained in the input data. WT decomposes the main time series data into its sub-components. ANN models developed using input data processed by the WT instead of using data in its raw form are known as hybrid wavelet models. The hybrid wavelet data driven models, using multi-scale input data, results in improved performance by capturing useful information concealed in the main time series data in its raw form. This chapter will cover theoretical as well as practical applications of hybrid wavelet neural network models in hydrology.

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  • Automatic Meshing of Femur Cortical Surfaces from Clinical CT Images

    Zhang, Ju; Malcolm, D; Hislop-Jambrichc, J; Thomas, CDL; Nielsen, Poul (2012)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    We present an automated image-to-mesh workflow that meshes the cortical surfaces of the human femur, from clinical CT images. A piecewise parametric mesh of the femoral surface is customized to the in-image femoral surface by an active shape model. Then, by using this mesh as a first approximation, we segment cortical surfaces via a model of cortical morphology and imaging characteristics. The mesh is then customized further to represent the segmented inner and outer cortical surfaces. We validate the accuracy of the resulting meshes against an established semi-automated method. Root mean square error for the inner and outer cortical meshes were 0.74 mm and 0.89 mm, respectively. Mean mesh thickness absolute error was 0.03 mm with a standard deviation of 0.60 mm. The proposed method produces meshes that are correspondent across subjects, making it suitable for automatic collection of cortical geometry for statistical shape analysis.

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  • Total Synthesis of the Fungal Metabolite Virgatolide B

    Hume, Paul; Furkert, Daniel; Brimble, Margaret (2015)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This account describes the total synthesis of the title compound, a polyketide metabolite with in vitro antitumor activity. A first-generation approach involving an sp3–sp2 Suzuki cross-coupling reaction of a chiral trifluoroboratoamide and a rotationally symmetric aryl bromide successfully established the carbon framework required to construct the spiroketal core of the molecule. However, removal of the phenolic protecting groups with concomitant spiroketalization could not be achieved. A revised strategy was therefore devised, employing different protecting groups and incorporating greater functionality on the aryl bromide coupling partner. Suzuki cross-coupling, extension of the carbon backbone using a diastereoselective Mukaiyama aldol reaction and deprotection/cyclization furnished the spiroketal ring system. The final transformation required was carboalkoxylation of the aromatic ring to form the phthalide subunit present in the molecule. This manipulation was difficult to achieve due to competing protodehalogenation. Finally, a reordering of synthetic events provided access to virgatolide B by exploitation of an intramolecular hydrogen-bonding interaction in order to control the regioselectivity of the spiroketalization process.

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  • What can reverse mentoring models contribute to communities of practice involving developed and rising economies?

    Dunham, Annette; Ross, M (2016)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Communities of practice have been proposed as effective means of building cooperative knowledge sharing relationships between locals and experts from emerging and developed economies (including divisions within some multinational companies). Mentoring relationships in general have been found to support the work of communities of practice. Reverse mentoring relationships are the reverse to what is traditionally expected of a mentoring relationship; they involve the mentoring of a mature or more experienced employee by a younger or generally less experienced employee, but also have the potential to offer much to communities of practice. In the context of communities of practice involving developed and emerging economies, reverse mentoring relationships have the potential to facilitate nationals' (the reverse mentors) sharing of local knowledge while at the same time providing them with leadership development courtesy of the developed country's representative(s) (the reverse mentee(s)), a winning solution for communities of practice and multinational companies. This chapter outlines the benefits of reverse mentoring relationships for communities of practice, and identifies some potential challenges for these partnerships. The implications of these for managers and practitioners are outlined. An agenda for research into reverse mentoring arrangements will complete this chapter. The aim of the chapter is to show how reverse mentoring relationships can complement the work of communities of practice in fostering co-operative knowledge sharing between those in developed and emerging economies.

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  • Dal Monte Ventoso a Point Lenana: la sfida di Wu Ming al postmoderno

    Manai, Franco (2015)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Measuring business performance in shipping

    Panayides, P; Gong, Xihe; Lambertides, N (2010)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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