1,701 results for Book item

  • Tales of a cross-cultural research journey: Navigating potholes, roadblocks and dead-ends

    Cobb, Donella J. (2014)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Undertaking doctoral studies in a different cultural context presents a plethora of challenges for doctoral students. This chapter documents the experiences of one researcher navigating the early stages of her doctoral journey in a cultural context significantly different from her own. While the development of the initial research framework has taken careful development, it has been the ethical considerations throughout this initial stage that have presented ongoing challenges, particularly when considering research from a critical perspective. This chapter highlights some important reflections for doctoral students undertaking research in developing countries, particularly in relation to communication, in-country ethics procedures, time delays and financial considerations. The difficulties encountered on the doctoral journey have highlighted the need to take a critical and reflexive stance throughout the development of the initial research proposal and to be flexible to change the direction of the research if and where needed. Because of a recent change in political circumstances, this nation will remain nameless throughout this chapter in order to protect those who may be implicated with the original work.

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  • Generation Y as wine tourists: their expectations and experiences at the winery cellar door

    Fountain, Joanna M.; Charters, S.

    Book item
    Lincoln University

    Wine tourism and research surrounding it has developed substantially over the last 15 years. The importance for wineries of visitation to cellar doors is recognised by both the tourism and wine industries (Carlsen and Charters, 2006; Mitchell and Hall, 2006) and the need to understand the expectations and experiences of wine tourists has driven much of the research that has been conducted. Ensuring a match between expectations and experience of the cellar door will affect not only the tourists‟ satisfaction with the experience but their emotional attachments to the brand and, by implication, their future purchase intentions (Dodd and Bigotte, 1997). It is important to note, however, that wine tourists are not a homogeneous grouping (Charters and Ali-Knight, 2002; Mitchell, Hall, and McIntosh, 2000), and the importance of understanding the differences between them is increasingly recognised. Anecdotal evidence suggests that Baby Boomers, particularly males, have been viewed as the typical, and perhaps most desirable, wine tourist in the past (Charters and O'Neill, 2000). This is due to a range of factors, including their role in driving the growth in wine consumption in the Anglophone world, their perceived level of wine knowledge and wine involvement and greater disposable income. However, it is now becoming clear that a younger generation of wine consumers and wine tourists need to be considered if the industry is to have a long-term future (Koerber, 2000). This will require an understanding of the relationship of Generation Y to the winery experience. To this end, this chapter explores the attitudes, expectations and behaviour of Generation Y at the winery cellar door. In particular, the focus is on their preferences regarding the interaction they seek with cellar door staff, their needs with regards to the type of education and/or information sought during a winery visit and their overall attitude to a winery experience. The chapter is based on fieldwork conducted in Swan Valley, Western Australia, Yarra Valley, Victoria, and Waipara Valley, New Zealand. It is worth noting that Generation Y has been defined in this chapter as those born between 1978 and 1994 (Sheahan, 2005).

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  • Heartland Wainuiomata: Rurality to suburbs, black singlets to naughty lingerie

    Longhurst, Robyn; Wilson, Carla (2002)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Robyn Longhurst and Carla Wilson enlarge the question of both national identity and gender by investigating the aptly-named Heartland documentary series. They analyse both the series itself and the discourses around it from the book of the series to the press cuttings. In doing so they pinpoint images of nation, masculinity and femininity that are both stable and transgressive and which emerge through the documentaries themselves, their presenter Gamy McCormack and the celebrated Chloe of Wainuiomata.

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  • Climate change and grape wine quality: a GIS approach to analysing New Zealand wine region

    Shanmuganathan, S; Narayanan, A; Sallis, P (2012-12-11)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    The influences of seasonal climate variability on the phenological dynamics of certain terrestrial communities observed mostly since the mid‐20th century are seen as leading to unprecedented consequences (Richard, et al., 2009). The potential impacts of the phenomenon on the phenological development and in turn on the species composition of certain specific plant, insect, aquatic, bird and animal communities evolved in parallel over millions of years to form the existing “make‐up” of what is referred to as the “biodiversity” or “endemic species” of these natural habitats, are depicted as significant (Peñuelas and Estiarte, 2010). Scientific research results have revealed that the recent rapid climate change effects on these systems, more specifically during the last few decades, have resulted in presently being seen “temporal mismatch in interacting species”. Such ecological observations are even described as early vital signs of imminent “regime shifts” in the current base climate of these regions or latitudes (Schweiger, Settele, Kudrna, & Klotz, 2008: Saino, et al., 2009). On the other hand, climatologists portray the major cause for such rapid “climate regime shifts” and the consequent impacts on the survival of so called co‐evolved species, as anthropogenic (Anderson, Kelly, Ladley, Molloy, & Terry, 2011). For this reason, research relating to climate change impacts on vegetation spread over landscapes, phenological development and population dynamics of susceptible communities, in some cases even with potential threat for total extinction of “endangered species” under future climate change, has in recent years gained enormous momentum. In fact, this unprecedented attention has also drawn greater scrutiny and controversies at never seen before proportions in a way hindering any form of formal research on the phenomenon (Shanmuganathan & Sallis, 2010).

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  • "I my own professor": Ashton-Warner as New Zealand educational theorist, 1940-60.

    Middleton, Sue (2006)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    The invitation to contribute to this volume addressed me as a New Zealander who had written about how Sylvia Ashton-Warner's fantasies, theories, imagery, and life-history narratives threaded their way through my own. I had written of my youthful encounters with her work in Educating Feminists (Middleton 1993), in which I looked back on reading Spinster in 1960 at age thirteen and reflected on my teenage dreams of life as an artist and beatnik in Parisian cafes and garrets: confined to an Edwardian boarding school hostel in a provincial New Zealand town, I had plotted my escape to what Ashton-Warner described in Myself as "some bohemian studio on the Left Bank in Paris or over a bowl of wine in Italy, me all sophisticated and that, with dozens of lovers, paint everywhere and love and communion and sympathy and all that" (Myself, 212). When, in the early 1970s, I began secondary school teaching and read Teacher, that book built bridges between the frightening urgency of classroom survival, the enticing theories but alien classrooms described by American deschoolers and free-schoolers, and "what I believed myself to be when a girl on the long long road to school, a vagabond and an artist" (I Passed This Way, 307). As a young teacher I, too, had poured my impassioned soul into writing journals and poetry, painting, and playing the piano. Like Ashton-Warner, I had hoped that artistic self-expression could keep the mad woman in my attic at bay, for "asylums are full of artists who failed to say the things they must and famous tombs are full of those who did" (Incense to Idols, 169).

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  • Researching Identities: Impact of the Performance-Base Research Fund on the Subject(s) of Education

    Middleton, Sue (2006)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    My argument begins by introducing key conceptual tools, applying them to the formative years of Education as a university subject. Second, I sketch a brief history of the subject in New Zealand in the 1980s and 1990s, emphasising its contradictory mandates as both academic and professional/clinical discipline. Third, I explore interviewees’ experiences and perspectives during and immediately after the quality evaluation process (Middleton, 2005a). The conclusion suggests ways the evaluation model might change to support (not penalise) Education’s dual mandate to enhance research capacity and outputs and to produce good practitioners for the teaching professions.

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  • Sylvia’s place: Ashton-Warner as New Zealand educational theorist.

    Middleton, Sue (2009)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Sylvia Ashton-Warner’s New Zealand educational context has been – and continues to be – misrepresented as antithetical to her creative methods. Sue Middleton, a professor of education, locates Sylvia’s educational ideas within the national and international Progressive Education movement, indicating that key education officials in post-war New Zealand encouraged creativity and self-expression. This chapter makes the case that, as a teacher, an educational writer and theorist, Sylvia Ashton-Warner grew in, and not in spite of New Zealand. My argument unfolds in two parts. The first reviews theoretical ideas in the local and international educational environment in which Sylvia lived and worked. Sylvia and Keith Henderson taught in what was referred to until 1946 as the Native School system (and from 1948 until its abolition in 1968 as the Maori Scholl system). They trained and began work as teachers during the Great Depression; and Sylvia began serious writing during World War Two. The war and the Native Scholl system interested in complex ways with the wider international Progressive Education movement and its promotion ‘from the top’ in New Zealand’s public schools. An overview of Progressive (or New ) Education, the changing theories of culture and race in the Native School system, and relations between these during World War Two, opens a wide-angled aperture through which to read Sylvia’s early writing.

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  • Introduction: Sylvia, a New Zealander

    Jones, Alison; Middleton, Sue (2009)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Sylvia Ashton-Warner had an intensely ambivalent relationship with the land of her birth. Despite receiving many accolades in New Zealand – including the country’s major literary award – she claimed to have been rejected and persecuted, and regularly announced that her educational and literary achievements were unappreciated or insufficiently acknowledged by her compatriots. In her darkest moments, she railed against New Zealand and New Zealander, even stating in one television interview: “I’m not a New Zealander!”

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  • The right to life and law enforcement activities: The approrpriateness of a military response ot the problem of terrorism

    Chevalier-Watts, Juliet (2013)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    This paper considers the issue of the right to life in several lethal force cases heard in the European Court of Human Rights as a result of State activity in response to terrorist and armed activity. In light of extensive judicial scrutiny, and the recent erroneous shooting dead of Brazilian electrician, Jean Charles de Menezes on the London Underground by police, this paper submits that a military response may balance the dichotomy of terrorism and the right to life. Article 2, the right to life, is the most fundamental of all the provisions of the European Convention on Human Rights; without it, all other provisions are redundant. However, this very right, in the context of lethal force and terrorism, was brought sharply into focus when Strasbourg heard the ground breaking Death on the Rock case, where terrorist suspects were shot dead by Special Forces soldiers in Gibraltar. Since this case, a number of lethal force cases have been heard by the European Court in relation to military and police terrorist operations. These cases have been subject to detailed scrutiny as to the application of the provisions of Article 2 of the Convention, and have produced divergent results. As a result, this paper submits that, in Europe at least, a military response acknowledges a State's authority to protect its populous and its agents, whilst at the same time entrenching the fundamental principle of the right to life, thus balancing two theoretically opposing concepts: the authority of the State and the right to life.

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  • Ashton-Warner, Sylvia Constance

    Middleton, Sue (2012)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    An overview of the life and career of Educationalist, teacher, writer Sylvia Constance Ashton-Warner.

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  • Ta moko: Maori tattoo

    Te Awekotuku, Ngahuia (1997)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    The author examines the history, technique and meaning of ta moko (Maori tattoo) from prehistory to modern times.

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  • What if Women Weren’t Enfranchised in 1893

    Daley, Caroline (2010)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Becoming PBRF-able: Research assessment and education in New Zealand

    Middleton, Sue (2009)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    It seems ironic that, designed as they are to quantify, evaluate and reward the research quantum of academic institutions, departments and individuals, research assessment exercises have themselves become objects of their research and critique. As many in this volume and elsewhere attest, the impact of research assessment runs deeper than mere measurement of “what is already there”: such processes are productive, or formative (Henkel, 2005, McNay, 2003; Sikes, 2006). Of course bringing about change is intended in the sense of increasing research quantity, enhancing its quality, etc. However, there are suggestions that by changing the conditions of knowledge production, research assessment exercises may also alter the shape and direction of disciplines by diverting and channelling researchers’ intellectual attention and political engagement, influencing what they study, how they do it, and how they report and write (Beck and Yong, 2005; Bernstein, 2000).

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  • Dating marine shell in Oceania: Issues and prospects

    Petchey, Fiona (2009)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Marine shell has several advantages for radiocarbon (¹⁴C) dating in the Pacific — it is ubiquitous in archaeological sites, is easy to identify to the species level, and can often be related directly to human activity. Consequently, shells are one of the most commonly dated ¹⁴C sample types within this region. The modelled marine calibration curve and associated regional offsets (known as ΔR) originally constructed by Stuiver et al. (1986), have been widely accepted as the most accurate method for calibrating surface marine ¹⁴C dates. The use of published values, however, is not straightforward because the surface ocean ¹⁴C reservoir is variable both regionally and over time, and because of additional uncertainties with the reliability of some shell species due to habitat and dietary preferences. This paper presents an overview of ΔR variability in Oceania and highlights areas of caution when using extant ΔR values, and when selecting marine shell for ¹⁴C dating. Particular attention is given to the Hawaiian archipelago where numerous ΔR values are available for evaluation and the influence of ocean currents, estuarine environments and geology is apparent.

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  • Borderline bodies

    Johnston, Lynda (2002)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    This chapter is about borders that are made and broken at gay pride parades. Specifically, I examine the discursive and material borders maintained in tourism discourse. Binary oppositions such as self/other, straight/gay, and tourist/host provide a focus for this chapter. I am interested in where these borders wear thin and threaten to break and disrupt social order. I explore the bodies of gay pride parades because it is bodies such as these that threaten the borders of corporeal acceptability.

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  • Combining models for interactive system modelling

    Bowen, Judy; Reeves, Steve (2017)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Our approach for modelling interactive systems has been to develop models for the interface and interaction which are lightweight but with an underlying formal semantics. Combined with traditional formal methods to describe functional behaviour, this provides the ability to create a single formal model of interactive systems and consider all parts (functionality, user interface and interaction) with the same rigorous level of formality. The ability to convert the different models we use from one notation to another has given us a set of models which describe an interactive system (or parts of that system) at different levels of abstraction in ways most suitable for the domain but which can be combined into a single model for model checking, theorem proving, etc. There are, however, many benefits to using the individual models for different purposes throughout the development process. In this chapter, we provide examples of this using the nuclear power plant control system as an example.

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  • Development of a real-time full-field range imaging system

    Jongenelen, Adrian P.P.; Payne, Andrew D.; Carnegie, Dale A.; Dorrington, Adrian A.; Cree, Michael J. (2009)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    This article describes the development of a full-field range imaging system employing a high frequency amplitude modulated light source and image sensor. Depth images are produced at video frame rates in which each pixel in the image represents distance from the sensor to objects in the scene. The various hardware subsystems are described as are the details about the firmware and software implementation for processing the images in real-time. The system is flexible in that precision can be traded off for decreased acquisition time. Results are reported to illustrate this versatility for both high-speed (reduced precision) and high-precision operating modes.

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  • No end in sight: Information skills for academics and researchers

    White, Bruce; Gendall, Rae; Naidoo, Kogi (2004)

    Book item
    Massey University

    This paper follows the genesis, development and delivery of knowledge management seminars aimed at academics and researchers in the university environment who, although they are lifelong learners in their own subject areas, are not necessarily maintaining the currency of their own information-seeking skills.

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  • Topics of formal methods in HCI

    Bowen, Judy; Dix, Alan; Palanque, Palanque; Weyers, Benjamin (2017)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    In this chapter, we present an overview of some of the general themes and topics that can be seen in research into formal methods in human–computer interaction. We discuss how the contents of the rest of the book relate to these topics. In particular, we show how themes have evolved into particular branches of research and where the book contents fit with this. We also discuss the areas of research that are relevant, but are not represented within the book chapters.

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  • Why case study research? Introduction to the field guide to case study research in tourism, hospitality, and leisure

    Hyde, Kenneth F.; Ryan, Chris; Woodside, Arch G. (2012)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    This chapter is a general introduction to the field of case study research in tourism, hospitality, and leisure. The chapter presents a brief review of the literature on the intra-individual logic of case study research. The chapter describes the “four horsemen” for doing case study research: accuracy, generality, complexity/coverage, and value/impact. Examples in the chapter that illustrate this perspective for undertaking case study research may impassion the reader to read through the field guide and personally engage in case study research – at least that is the hope of the editors of this field guide.

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