1,693 results for Book item

  • Sport and education: Sport in secondary schools for all or for some?

    Grant, Bevan C.; Pope, Clive C. (2007)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    The place of sport in schools has always been controversial and struggled to gain legitimacy and acceptance as a part of the formal curriculum. While some commentators argue sport has no place in the curriculum, others claim it is too important to be left to chance and, like other aspects of education, it can and should be pursued for its own intrinsic value. For example, Siedentop (1982, p. 2) stated, 'if sport is equal to other ludic [movement] forms (art, drama, music and dance) both for the individual and the culture; and if more appropriate participation in sport represents a positive step in cultural evolution then sport in education is justified'. From another but still supportive perspective, Arnold (1997, p. I) claimed, 'sport is a trans-cultural valued practice ... and despite its corruption from time to time it is inherently concerned with concepts, ethical principles and moral values which are universally applicable and justified as a form of education'

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  • Improving adaptive bagging methods for evolving data streams

    Bifet, Albert; Holmes, Geoffrey; Pfahringer, Bernhard; Gavaldà, Ricard (2009)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    We propose two new improvements for bagging methods on evolving data streams. Recently, two new variants of Bagging were proposed: ADWIN Bagging and Adaptive-Size Hoeffding Tree (ASHT) Bagging. ASHT Bagging uses trees of different sizes, and ADWIN Bagging uses ADWIN as a change detector to decide when to discard underperforming ensemble members. We improve ADWIN Bagging using Hoeffding Adaptive Trees, trees that can adaptively learn from data streams that change over time. To speed up the time for adapting to change of Adaptive-Size Hoeffding Tree (ASHT) Bagging, we add an error change detector for each classifier. We test our improvements by performing an evaluation study on synthetic and real-world datasets comprising up to ten million examples.

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  • Tales of a cross-cultural research journey: Navigating potholes, roadblocks and dead-ends

    Cobb, Donella J. (2014)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Undertaking doctoral studies in a different cultural context presents a plethora of challenges for doctoral students. This chapter documents the experiences of one researcher navigating the early stages of her doctoral journey in a cultural context significantly different from her own. While the development of the initial research framework has taken careful development, it has been the ethical considerations throughout this initial stage that have presented ongoing challenges, particularly when considering research from a critical perspective. This chapter highlights some important reflections for doctoral students undertaking research in developing countries, particularly in relation to communication, in-country ethics procedures, time delays and financial considerations. The difficulties encountered on the doctoral journey have highlighted the need to take a critical and reflexive stance throughout the development of the initial research proposal and to be flexible to change the direction of the research if and where needed. Because of a recent change in political circumstances, this nation will remain nameless throughout this chapter in order to protect those who may be implicated with the original work.

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  • Generation Y as wine tourists: their expectations and experiences at the winery cellar door

    Fountain, Joanna M.; Charters, S.

    Book item
    Lincoln University

    Wine tourism and research surrounding it has developed substantially over the last 15 years. The importance for wineries of visitation to cellar doors is recognised by both the tourism and wine industries (Carlsen and Charters, 2006; Mitchell and Hall, 2006) and the need to understand the expectations and experiences of wine tourists has driven much of the research that has been conducted. Ensuring a match between expectations and experience of the cellar door will affect not only the tourists‟ satisfaction with the experience but their emotional attachments to the brand and, by implication, their future purchase intentions (Dodd and Bigotte, 1997). It is important to note, however, that wine tourists are not a homogeneous grouping (Charters and Ali-Knight, 2002; Mitchell, Hall, and McIntosh, 2000), and the importance of understanding the differences between them is increasingly recognised. Anecdotal evidence suggests that Baby Boomers, particularly males, have been viewed as the typical, and perhaps most desirable, wine tourist in the past (Charters and O'Neill, 2000). This is due to a range of factors, including their role in driving the growth in wine consumption in the Anglophone world, their perceived level of wine knowledge and wine involvement and greater disposable income. However, it is now becoming clear that a younger generation of wine consumers and wine tourists need to be considered if the industry is to have a long-term future (Koerber, 2000). This will require an understanding of the relationship of Generation Y to the winery experience. To this end, this chapter explores the attitudes, expectations and behaviour of Generation Y at the winery cellar door. In particular, the focus is on their preferences regarding the interaction they seek with cellar door staff, their needs with regards to the type of education and/or information sought during a winery visit and their overall attitude to a winery experience. The chapter is based on fieldwork conducted in Swan Valley, Western Australia, Yarra Valley, Victoria, and Waipara Valley, New Zealand. It is worth noting that Generation Y has been defined in this chapter as those born between 1978 and 1994 (Sheahan, 2005).

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  • Combining models for interactive system modelling

    Bowen, Judy; Reeves, Steve (2017)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Our approach for modelling interactive systems has been to develop models for the interface and interaction which are lightweight but with an underlying formal semantics. Combined with traditional formal methods to describe functional behaviour, this provides the ability to create a single formal model of interactive systems and consider all parts (functionality, user interface and interaction) with the same rigorous level of formality. The ability to convert the different models we use from one notation to another has given us a set of models which describe an interactive system (or parts of that system) at different levels of abstraction in ways most suitable for the domain but which can be combined into a single model for model checking, theorem proving, etc. There are, however, many benefits to using the individual models for different purposes throughout the development process. In this chapter, we provide examples of this using the nuclear power plant control system as an example.

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  • What if Women Weren’t Enfranchised in 1893

    Daley, Caroline (2010)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Heartland Wainuiomata: Rurality to suburbs, black singlets to naughty lingerie

    Longhurst, Robyn; Wilson, Carla (2002)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Robyn Longhurst and Carla Wilson enlarge the question of both national identity and gender by investigating the aptly-named Heartland documentary series. They analyse both the series itself and the discourses around it from the book of the series to the press cuttings. In doing so they pinpoint images of nation, masculinity and femininity that are both stable and transgressive and which emerge through the documentaries themselves, their presenter Gamy McCormack and the celebrated Chloe of Wainuiomata.

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  • Climate change and grape wine quality: a GIS approach to analysing New Zealand wine region

    Shanmuganathan, S; Narayanan, A; Sallis, P (2012-12-11)

    Book item
    Auckland University of Technology

    The influences of seasonal climate variability on the phenological dynamics of certain terrestrial communities observed mostly since the mid‐20th century are seen as leading to unprecedented consequences (Richard, et al., 2009). The potential impacts of the phenomenon on the phenological development and in turn on the species composition of certain specific plant, insect, aquatic, bird and animal communities evolved in parallel over millions of years to form the existing “make‐up” of what is referred to as the “biodiversity” or “endemic species” of these natural habitats, are depicted as significant (Peñuelas and Estiarte, 2010). Scientific research results have revealed that the recent rapid climate change effects on these systems, more specifically during the last few decades, have resulted in presently being seen “temporal mismatch in interacting species”. Such ecological observations are even described as early vital signs of imminent “regime shifts” in the current base climate of these regions or latitudes (Schweiger, Settele, Kudrna, & Klotz, 2008: Saino, et al., 2009). On the other hand, climatologists portray the major cause for such rapid “climate regime shifts” and the consequent impacts on the survival of so called co‐evolved species, as anthropogenic (Anderson, Kelly, Ladley, Molloy, & Terry, 2011). For this reason, research relating to climate change impacts on vegetation spread over landscapes, phenological development and population dynamics of susceptible communities, in some cases even with potential threat for total extinction of “endangered species” under future climate change, has in recent years gained enormous momentum. In fact, this unprecedented attention has also drawn greater scrutiny and controversies at never seen before proportions in a way hindering any form of formal research on the phenomenon (Shanmuganathan & Sallis, 2010).

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  • Ta moko: Maori tattoo

    Te Awekotuku, Ngahuia (1997)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    The author examines the history, technique and meaning of ta moko (Maori tattoo) from prehistory to modern times.

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  • Jewellery out of context

    Shepheard, Carole ; Deckers, Peter (2009-12-23)

    Book item
    Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    Jewellery Out of Context (joc) is an exhibition of 24 submissions created by 31 New Zealand artists (immigrants, emigrants, migrants, and natives to New Zealand). The exhibition was held at the Muse, Ultimo, Sydney in early 2006. The artists explore the relationships and transformations of jewellery in its wider context.

    The joc brief is open-ended, with the aim to reveal and unravel the many facets related to the formation and organisation of the jewellery discourse. This exhibition aims to provoke the jewellery community by deconstructing and reassembling its most elementary principle "made to wear". Instead this exhibition is put together as a playful token for its own centralised existence, like: "jewellery" has a good look to itself, or "jewellery" dresses up for its own party.

    The motivation to include in the "call for entries" multi-disciplines relates also to the aims of the 2006 Jewellers' and Metalsmiths' Group of Australia (jmga) theme, which is "to take makers, collectors,critics and thinkers out of the comfort zone of their normal environments and place them 'on location'; a hypothetical site where speculation, inspiration and the accidental can emerge and diverge, questioning the place of the production of meaning and the meaning of production". In the joc exhibition a combination of the craft, design and fine art practices can be detected side-by-side, the crossbreds and the purebreds. This exhibition has no format, other then to celebrate jewellery and its related world. What is precious and what is non-precious seen through the eyes of artists will transform relationships and positions of normality. It is made special by the reflection of who we are and what we like to be. This exhibition invited artists to look beyond, but not away from the phenomena of object ornamentation and object psychology. Trends and fashions occupy the object maker in its transfixed craft art practice, which is shared closely but not exclusively by the fine art temperaments.

    Peter Deckers (Curator)

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  • Borderline bodies

    Johnston, Lynda (2002)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    This chapter is about borders that are made and broken at gay pride parades. Specifically, I examine the discursive and material borders maintained in tourism discourse. Binary oppositions such as self/other, straight/gay, and tourist/host provide a focus for this chapter. I am interested in where these borders wear thin and threaten to break and disrupt social order. I explore the bodies of gay pride parades because it is bodies such as these that threaten the borders of corporeal acceptability.

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  • Physiology, blooms and prediction of planktonic cyanobacteria

    Oliver, Roderick L.; Hamilton, David P.; Brookes, Justin D.; Ganf, George G. (2012)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    This chapter addresses some of the challenges associated with trying to model population fluctuations, bloom formation and collapse of planktonic cyanobacteria. It is argued that improved modelling and prediction rely on a better understanding of the physiological responses of cyanobacteria to the physical and chemical characteristics of their environment. In addition there is a need to understand better the complex trophic interactions that influence population dynamics. The high variability of cyanobacterial populations represents a major challenge for models attempting to make predictions at the whole lake scale. Many of the physiological attributes described within specific models do not capture the dynamics of cyanobacteria, because of the extensive parameterisations required by the array of descriptive algorithms. The physiological attributes to be modelled include the ability to fix nitrogen, store both nitrogen and phosphorus, capture light across a range of wavelengths with specific accessory pigments, form colonies or filaments and regulate buoyancy through the balance between gas vacuoles and cellular constituents.

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  • Effects of climate change on New Zealand Lakes

    Goldman, Charles R.; Kumagai, Michio; Robarts, Richard D.; Hamilton, David P.; McBride, Chris G.; Özkundakci, Deniz; Schallenberg, Marc; Verburg, Piet; de Winton, Mary; Kelly, David; Hendy, Chris H.; Ye, Wei (2013)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    This chapter contains sections titled: -Introduction -Geographical and climate perspective -Historical climate -Future climate -Overview of lake types and formation processes -Climate change and impacts on endemic and exotic flora and fauna -Climate change impacts on fish -Climate change impacts on aquatic plants and macroinvertebrates -Effects of climate change on shallow NZ lakes -Effects of climate change on high-altitude NZ lakes -Case study: Lake Taupo -Case study: Lake Pupuke -Case study: surface temperature in monomictic and polymictic Rotorua lakes -Case study: bottom-water dissolved oxygen in Lake Rotoiti -Case study: modeling effects of land use and climate change for Lake Rotorua -Management challenges and mitigation measures -Conclusions -References

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