1,701 results for Book item

  • The Tikopia and “What Raymond Said”

    Macdonald, Judith (2000)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    I collected information for another version of a Tikopia fifty years on from Firth's first visit, I spoke to women and gained new insights from a paradigm undreamed in 1929. Then I wrote a thesis in a manner appropriate to my status in the discipline because, according to Paul Rabinow, one cannot be experimental without tenure. After that my representation of the Tikopia engaged with the symbolic and reflexive, seeking a voice to describe my perceptions of Tikopia. But under my voice was an imbrication of voices: Firth's, the Tikopia's, the Tikopia quoting Firth, and a discipline trying hard to get it right.

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  • Country institutional report: New Zealand

    Michelle, Carolyn (2004)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Waikato University pioneered the development of Women’s Studies as an academic discipline in New Zealand, with the first paper on this subject being offered in 1974. By 1982, a programme of papers was offered within five departments and the subject could be taken as a second supporting subject. A Centre for Women’s Studies was established in 1986, and, by 1988, was offering five taught core undergraduate papers and six electives, all of which could be taken towards a first or second support. A supporting BSocSci major in Women’s Studies became available in 1988, along with a Diploma in Women’s Studies. The full major became available in 1990. At this time, the major comprised a limited selection of core Women’s Studies papers complemented by a wider range of elective papers offered by other departments. This structure ensured that the programme had strong interdisciplinary, and in some cases inter-faculty linkages, along with wide support across the university through a network of elective teachers. These linkages appear to have facilitated strong growth in student numbers during the late 1980s and early 1990s.

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  • Blue-lip'd cannibal ladies: The allure of the exotic in the illicit Resolution Journal of Gunner John Marra

    Ryan, Tom (2001)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Discusses the history and content of the “Journal of the Resolution’s Voyage”, an unauthorized and illicitly published account of Cook’s second voyage of exploration in the Antipodes, by Gunner John Marra of the Resolution’s crew.

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  • Introduction: Reading Bakhtin educationally

    White, Elizabeth Jayne; Peters, Michael A. (2011)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Reading Bakhtin is a literary experience that leaves the reader gasping for air yet wanting more. His ideas are elusive, foreign, and dark, while at the same time alluring, hopeful, and joyous. To read Bakhtin and the work of other members of his circle calls the reader to a place of instability and confusion-not only in reading the seemingly contradictory nature of the text and grappling with translated misunderstandings, but also in grasping the Aesopian style of writing that characterizes his work. We offer this collection as a starting point to explore and perhaps even exploit some of the ramifications of Bakhtin's dialogic work; and in doing so consider its relevance for educational theory, practice, and policy across the globe. We welcome the potential for dialogical engagement within this collection by educationalists and others, and look forward to the resulting dialogues-pedagogies and policy encounters-this book will, hopefully, invoke.

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  • Introduction: Changing times, changing places

    Coleborne, Catharine (2012)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    This history of Tokanui Hospital and mental health services in the Waikato is a collection of the different stories of the many members of that community. We have chosen to tell these stories through the eyes of several writers, with some of them perhaps even competing perspectives, hoping to capture close to the full range of responses to and experiences of mental health in the Waikato over time. Tokanui Hospital- for a time, the main focus of mental health services in the region - was itself plural and complex. Through our collectively authored history, we show how the closure of Tokanui impacted upon its many residents and staff and the wider community around the hospital, and how the dispersal of mental health functions into the community has continued to evoke resounding memories of Tokanui.

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  • ‘Doctoring’ our own: Confessions of a Māori doctoral supervisor

    Hohepa, Margie Kahukura (2010)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    There is very little literature, empirically based or otherwise, on the supervision of Māori doctoral students (Fitzgerald, 2005; Pope, 2008; Kidman, 2007; Smith, 2007). There is even less relating to Māori supervisors working with Māori doctoral students (Kidinan, 2007), let alone Māori supervisors working with non- Māori students. While the relatively large corpus of literature on doctoral supervision may be of some assistance to Māori supervisors, there is also a dearth of studies that focus on the pedagogical aspects. Research undertaken by Elizabeth McKinley and her co-researchers (McKinley, Grant, Middleton, Irwin & Williams, 2009) will now help to fill the literature gap on the teaching and learning process of supervision as it pertains to Māori.

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  • Bicultural perspectives on Māori legal research

    Mackinnon, Jacquelin (2007)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Increasingly, legal research projects undertaken at law school or in practice will involve Māori custom law and/or tikanga Māori.' The role of both Māori custom law and tikanga Māori is most evident in the work of the Māori Land Court in the interpretation and application of legislation relating to Māori land. Increasingly, general statutes incorporate Māori principles and values, such as those to be found in the Resource Management Act 1991, or make explicit reference to the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi. The statutory interpretation function of the Courts in relation to these, and less obvious examples, requires knowledge of tikanga Māori and/or Māori custom law. For any analysis of the work of the Courts or of the legislature, knowledge of tikanga Māori and/or custom law is required. Both Māori custom law and tikanga Māori are preserved by and accessed through the oral tradition. In addition to its role in the Courts and in relation to legislation, the most significant role played by the oral tradition is in the work of the Waitangi Tribunal. The oral tradition also plays an increasingly important part in other areas requiring research. What follows is an introduction to the oral tradition and its role in the legal system of Aotearoa/New Zealand. An understanding of the oral tradition is essential to the construction of a research path that is both ethical and effective.

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  • Motivations for contemporary Tongan migration

    Cowling, Wendy E. (2002)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Migration can be seen as a process in which large numbers of individuals and families begin to write a new history for themselves. The initial act of leaving one's parents, family, neighbourhood, society and culture, and adopting a new life- and work-style is a crucial one. Only a small proportion of people who enter a migration process, or who have participated in major migration movements in the past, have had a clear perception of what they were going to encounter, or the extent to which their lives were going to change. While it is very likely that a large proportion of the individual migrants are the forerunners in a migration which will ultimately involve other members of their kin network, they are not usually able to foresee this at the time.

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  • Everyday gambling in New Zealand

    Curtis, Bruce; Wilson, Cate (2001)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    There is a sizeable body of statistics on gambling in New Zealand which points albeit unintentionally - to the everyday status of this activity. Max Abbott and Rachel Volberg, two leading figures in the rapidly growing discipline of gambling studies, note that in 15 short years there have been no less than seven surveys on gambling in New Zealand (not including a large number of university theses). These include three assessments of people's participation in gambling by the Department of Internal Affairs, plus two surveys funded by the department focusing on problem gambling. To these can be added one conducted by a regional health authority, North Health, under contract to the Committee on Problem Gambling Management and one conducted on behalf of the Casino Control Authority. This much research on gambling should suggest to the reader that there is something about gambling that piques the interest of government bureaucrats and agencies. Here the frequency of the phrase `problem gambling' is the giveaway. In this section we will review some of the findings of this research and cover its more pathological rationale later.

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  • Superantigen architecture: Functional decoration on a conserved scaffold

    Arcus, Vickery L.; Baker, Edward N. (2007)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    A defining and consistent feature of the bacterial superantigens from Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes is their strongly conserved three-dimensional structure. Structural studies to date show that the array of more than 280 amino acid sequences known for superantigens (SAgs) and staphylococcal superantigen-like (SSL) proteins all have the same fold-a structure in which the same three-dimensional arrangement of α-helices and β-sheets is traced by each amino acid sequence, with the same topology (for recent reviews, see references 29 and 43). A typical SAg structure comprises two domains-an N-terminal β -barrel domain called an OB-fold (4, 25) and a C-terminal β-grasp domain in which a long α-helix packs on to a mixed parallel and antiparallel β-sheet. These two domains are traversed by an α-helix that lies at the N terminus of the protein and packs against the β-grasp domain, thus linking the N- and C-terminal domains.

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  • Jacqueline Fahey

    Dart, William (2007)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Chez Jacqueline Fahey is a Grey Lynn bungalow. After walking past palmy luxuriance that could pass as a tropical setting for her 1998 novel, Cutting Loose, I'm soon in her front room, the wonders and delights of which would rival those of a Victorian parlour. There are additions since my last visit - beyond a 19205 screen is a vast mirror, its faux-baroque frame livened with cerulean blue from Fahey's brush. Significantly, it echoes the hue of the plastic flowers threaded through the chandelier.

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  • 'Mong'st the furies finde just recompence': Suicide and the supernatural in William Sampson's The Vow Breaker (1636)

    Martin, Fiona (2015)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    The prevailing view on suicide in early modern England was that it was absolutely 'contrary to the Lawes and ordinances of God: 1 and contemporary theologians including John Sym, William Willymat, Robert Hill and Richard Greenham expounded in sermons and treatises on the prohibitions against self-murder and the dire consequences attendant upon the soul of the deceased.2 To take one's own life indirectly challenged the authority of the Church, and suicide, in its violation of community values, also awakened fears of the supernatural and of what the condemned soul might be capable. On the popular stage, of course, dramatizations of suicide could provide shocking but arresting scenes of conflict, both on the personal level and within the affected community.

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  • The usability of open source software: analysis and prospects

    Nichols, David M.; Twidale, Michael B. (2006)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Open source communities have successfully developed many pieces of software although most computer users only use proprietary applications. The usability of open source software is often regarded as one reason for this limited distribution. In this paper we review the existing evidence of the usability of open source software and discuss how the characteristics of open-source development influence usability. We describe how existing human-computer interaction techniques can be used to leverage distributed networked communities, of developers and users, to address issues of usability.

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  • Wearing moko: Maori facial marking in today’s world

    Nikora, Linda Waimarie; Rua, Mohi; Te Awekotuku, Ngahuia (2004-04-04)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    The early voyagers, missionaries, settlers all reacted to the pukanohi, to the marked faces of the Maori people, during the period of first contact, and the century following it. Their accounts are vivid, judgemental, revealing, telling us as much about them as they do about the people they described. Curiosity and horror are mixed with a genuine fascination; where sternly evangelizing words failed, armed confrontation occurred; and we now live with the results, te ao hou, a new world. In this world, today, wahine mau kauae, tangata mau moko, pukanohi – wearers – are speaking for themselves, about themselves, and commenting on how others view them. Unanimously, they insist that the decision to take the marking is about continuity, affirmation, identity and commitment. It is also about wearing those ancestors, carrying them into the future; as their moko become a companion, a salient being with its own life force, its own integrity and power, beyond the face.

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  • Reinhold Niebuhr’s Christian realism/ Christian idealism

    McKeogh, Colm (2007)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    The foregoing quip captures a realization that came to the young Reinhold Niebuhr in the 192os and that turned the liberal Christian pastor away from pacifism and toward a more realist ethic of politics. From then until his death in 1971, Niebuhr was to remain always a liberal Christian of realist bent. He was a liberal Christian in his concentration on the law of love as the only absolute and in his rejection of Christian fundamentalism, biblical literalism, and the consequent clash with science. He was a political realist, and rose to national prominence as such in the 1930S and 1940s, in his dismissal of pragmatic pacifism and his advocacy of American responsibility to use force in opposing the Nazi and Soviet threats to the world. He was famous particularly for his sharp attacks on those who failed to see the limits on morality in politics. Yet this realism was but one strand of Niebuhr's dualist approach to politics, the other being his Christian idealism.

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  • From the Galalpagos to Tongariro: Recognizing and saving the most important places in the world

    Gillespie, Alexander (2009)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Protected areas are one of the less glamorous areas of international environmental law. They are commonly overshadowed by what are perceived as much more dramatic topics, which capture the public attention to a much greater degree.1 This is a highly ironic situation for three reasons. First, because protected areas are the foremost methods by which species and ecosystems are effectively preserved. Second, because protected areas are tangible, and are not merely theoretical constructs. Third, the obligation to create protected areas is one of the most long-standing goals in numerous environmental treaties. For a long time this goal was not tied to any specific outcomes, and the numbers of protected areas grew slowly. However, in the new century, due to an increased recognition of the above considerations, the international community has not only reiterated the goal to create more protected areas, they also set targets of what they want to achieve. The international interest is this area can be seen with a number of examples, such as marine protected areas and transboundary protected areas. Collectively, such support has lead to the creation, in total, of over 102,000 protected areas spread over the Earth.

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  • Regional Assessment of Soil Change in Antarctica

    Balks, Megan R. (2015)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Antarctica has a total area of 13.9 × 106 km², of which 44 890 km² (0.32 percent) is ice-free (Fox and Cooper, 1994; British Antarctic Survey, 2005) with potential for soil development. Ice free areas are mainly confined to the Antarctic Peninsula, a few places around the perimeter of the continent and along the Transantarctic Mountains. The largest ice-free area (approximately 5 000 km²) is the McMurdo Dry Valleys in the Ross Sea Region.

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  • Agile methods for agile universities

    Twidale, Michael B.; Nichols, David M. (2013)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    We explore a term, Agile, that is being used in various workplace settings, including the management of universities. The term may have several related but slightly different meanings. Agile is often used in the context of facilitating more creative problem-solving and advocating for the adoption, design, tailoring and continual updating of more innovative organizational processes. We consider a particular set of meanings of the term from the world of software development. Agile methods were created to address certain problems with the software development process. Many of those problems have interesting analogues in the context of universities, so a reflection on agile methods may be a useful heuristic for generating ideas for enabling universities to be more creative.

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  • Mā hea (which way)? Mō te aha (what for)? Too many questions, not enough answers, for Māori on the march

    Te Awekotuku, Ngahuia (2012)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    This presentation will be in four sections. The first section introduces two major issues: mana motuhake, and mana tāngata, then we will consider some proposed legislation: the Foreshore and Seabed Bill and the Civil Union Bill. Then I will look at strategic Māori responses to political pressure over the last three decades and note two recent and dramatic examples – the Hīkoi Takutai Moana, April 2004, and the Enough is Enough Rally, August 2004. The final section considers the implications for psychologies and psychologists working today in Aotearoa.

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  • A jade door: Reconciliatory justice as a way forward citing New Zealand experience

    Joseph, Robert (2008)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Greenstone (jade) was highly valued in New Zealand because it was durable, beautiful, and precious. Greenstone is found only on the west coast of the South Island and was used as a means of exchange. In times of trouble, peace could be secured by ending warfare through a political marriage. Peace, thus established, was often likened figuratively to a greenstone door as both the woman and the peace ceremony were seen to be durable, strong, and valuable.

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