1,689 results for Book item

  • Far-flung markers

    Lowe, David J.; Alloway, Brent V.; Shane, Phil A.R. (2008)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Tephras are fragmentary materials that are blasted explosively into the air during volcanic eruptions. Distributed throughout Zealandia, tephras provide useful markers for connecting and dating land surfaces, sediment layers, and archaeological sites.

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  • Dusty horizons

    Lowe, David J.; Tonkin, Philip J.; Palmer, Alan S.; Palmer, Jonathan G. (2008)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Dust whipped up and deposited by wind forms sheets of loess, which drape over the land. These loess deposits and the soils formed within them yield insights into past climatic and environmental change.

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  • Jackson’s armchair: The only chair in town?

    Kingsbury, Justine; McKeown-Green, Jonathan (2009)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Are all the facts about nations, cultures and economies really just facts about people's mental states and their interactions? Are all of the properties which determine whether or not a thing is a work of art really just physical properties of that thing? Is linguistics, the scientific investigation of language, best understood as a branch of psychology, the scientific investigation of the mind? Can psychology be reduced to biology? Can all biological phenomena be explained chemically? Is chemistry really just part of physics? Is there anything going on in the world which isn't a physical thing? Can there be freely-chosen, autonomous human action in a purely physical world? Frank Jackson has made a controversial claim about the way in which one should investigate questions like these. This paper is a qualified defence of that claim.

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  • Researching our own practice

    Spiller, Dorothy; Bruce Ferguson, Pip (2011)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    In this chapter, we argue that using research to inform our teaching is a vital element in the reflection process and empowers us to keep developing our teaching in ways that can be transformative for ourselves and our learners.

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  • The Tikopia and “What Raymond Said”

    Macdonald, Judith (2000)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    I collected information for another version of a Tikopia fifty years on from Firth's first visit, I spoke to women and gained new insights from a paradigm undreamed in 1929. Then I wrote a thesis in a manner appropriate to my status in the discipline because, according to Paul Rabinow, one cannot be experimental without tenure. After that my representation of the Tikopia engaged with the symbolic and reflexive, seeking a voice to describe my perceptions of Tikopia. But under my voice was an imbrication of voices: Firth's, the Tikopia's, the Tikopia quoting Firth, and a discipline trying hard to get it right.

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  • Country institutional report: New Zealand

    Michelle, Carolyn (2004)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Waikato University pioneered the development of Women’s Studies as an academic discipline in New Zealand, with the first paper on this subject being offered in 1974. By 1982, a programme of papers was offered within five departments and the subject could be taken as a second supporting subject. A Centre for Women’s Studies was established in 1986, and, by 1988, was offering five taught core undergraduate papers and six electives, all of which could be taken towards a first or second support. A supporting BSocSci major in Women’s Studies became available in 1988, along with a Diploma in Women’s Studies. The full major became available in 1990. At this time, the major comprised a limited selection of core Women’s Studies papers complemented by a wider range of elective papers offered by other departments. This structure ensured that the programme had strong interdisciplinary, and in some cases inter-faculty linkages, along with wide support across the university through a network of elective teachers. These linkages appear to have facilitated strong growth in student numbers during the late 1980s and early 1990s.

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  • Blue-lip'd cannibal ladies: The allure of the exotic in the illicit Resolution Journal of Gunner John Marra

    Ryan, Tom (2001)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Discusses the history and content of the “Journal of the Resolution’s Voyage”, an unauthorized and illicitly published account of Cook’s second voyage of exploration in the Antipodes, by Gunner John Marra of the Resolution’s crew.

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  • Sport and education: Sport in secondary schools for all or for some?

    Grant, Bevan C.; Pope, Clive C. (2007)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    The place of sport in schools has always been controversial and struggled to gain legitimacy and acceptance as a part of the formal curriculum. While some commentators argue sport has no place in the curriculum, others claim it is too important to be left to chance and, like other aspects of education, it can and should be pursued for its own intrinsic value. For example, Siedentop (1982, p. 2) stated, 'if sport is equal to other ludic [movement] forms (art, drama, music and dance) both for the individual and the culture; and if more appropriate participation in sport represents a positive step in cultural evolution then sport in education is justified'. From another but still supportive perspective, Arnold (1997, p. I) claimed, 'sport is a trans-cultural valued practice ... and despite its corruption from time to time it is inherently concerned with concepts, ethical principles and moral values which are universally applicable and justified as a form of education'

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  • Introduction: Reading Bakhtin educationally

    White, Elizabeth Jayne; Peters, Michael A. (2011)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Reading Bakhtin is a literary experience that leaves the reader gasping for air yet wanting more. His ideas are elusive, foreign, and dark, while at the same time alluring, hopeful, and joyous. To read Bakhtin and the work of other members of his circle calls the reader to a place of instability and confusion-not only in reading the seemingly contradictory nature of the text and grappling with translated misunderstandings, but also in grasping the Aesopian style of writing that characterizes his work. We offer this collection as a starting point to explore and perhaps even exploit some of the ramifications of Bakhtin's dialogic work; and in doing so consider its relevance for educational theory, practice, and policy across the globe. We welcome the potential for dialogical engagement within this collection by educationalists and others, and look forward to the resulting dialogues-pedagogies and policy encounters-this book will, hopefully, invoke.

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  • Introduction: Changing times, changing places

    Coleborne, Catharine (2012)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    This history of Tokanui Hospital and mental health services in the Waikato is a collection of the different stories of the many members of that community. We have chosen to tell these stories through the eyes of several writers, with some of them perhaps even competing perspectives, hoping to capture close to the full range of responses to and experiences of mental health in the Waikato over time. Tokanui Hospital- for a time, the main focus of mental health services in the region - was itself plural and complex. Through our collectively authored history, we show how the closure of Tokanui impacted upon its many residents and staff and the wider community around the hospital, and how the dispersal of mental health functions into the community has continued to evoke resounding memories of Tokanui.

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  • ‘Doctoring’ our own: Confessions of a Māori doctoral supervisor

    Hohepa, Margie Kahukura (2010)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    There is very little literature, empirically based or otherwise, on the supervision of Māori doctoral students (Fitzgerald, 2005; Pope, 2008; Kidman, 2007; Smith, 2007). There is even less relating to Māori supervisors working with Māori doctoral students (Kidinan, 2007), let alone Māori supervisors working with non- Māori students. While the relatively large corpus of literature on doctoral supervision may be of some assistance to Māori supervisors, there is also a dearth of studies that focus on the pedagogical aspects. Research undertaken by Elizabeth McKinley and her co-researchers (McKinley, Grant, Middleton, Irwin & Williams, 2009) will now help to fill the literature gap on the teaching and learning process of supervision as it pertains to Māori.

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  • Dating marine shell in Oceania: Issues and prospects

    Petchey, Fiona (2009)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Marine shell has several advantages for radiocarbon (¹⁴C) dating in the Pacific — it is ubiquitous in archaeological sites, is easy to identify to the species level, and can often be related directly to human activity. Consequently, shells are one of the most commonly dated ¹⁴C sample types within this region. The modelled marine calibration curve and associated regional offsets (known as ΔR) originally constructed by Stuiver et al. (1986), have been widely accepted as the most accurate method for calibrating surface marine ¹⁴C dates. The use of published values, however, is not straightforward because the surface ocean ¹⁴C reservoir is variable both regionally and over time, and because of additional uncertainties with the reliability of some shell species due to habitat and dietary preferences. This paper presents an overview of ΔR variability in Oceania and highlights areas of caution when using extant ΔR values, and when selecting marine shell for ¹⁴C dating. Particular attention is given to the Hawaiian archipelago where numerous ΔR values are available for evaluation and the influence of ocean currents, estuarine environments and geology is apparent.

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  • Bicultural perspectives on Māori legal research

    Mackinnon, Jacquelin (2007)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Increasingly, legal research projects undertaken at law school or in practice will involve Māori custom law and/or tikanga Māori.' The role of both Māori custom law and tikanga Māori is most evident in the work of the Māori Land Court in the interpretation and application of legislation relating to Māori land. Increasingly, general statutes incorporate Māori principles and values, such as those to be found in the Resource Management Act 1991, or make explicit reference to the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi. The statutory interpretation function of the Courts in relation to these, and less obvious examples, requires knowledge of tikanga Māori and/or Māori custom law. For any analysis of the work of the Courts or of the legislature, knowledge of tikanga Māori and/or custom law is required. Both Māori custom law and tikanga Māori are preserved by and accessed through the oral tradition. In addition to its role in the Courts and in relation to legislation, the most significant role played by the oral tradition is in the work of the Waitangi Tribunal. The oral tradition also plays an increasingly important part in other areas requiring research. What follows is an introduction to the oral tradition and its role in the legal system of Aotearoa/New Zealand. An understanding of the oral tradition is essential to the construction of a research path that is both ethical and effective.

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  • Motivations for contemporary Tongan migration

    Cowling, Wendy E. (2002)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Migration can be seen as a process in which large numbers of individuals and families begin to write a new history for themselves. The initial act of leaving one's parents, family, neighbourhood, society and culture, and adopting a new life- and work-style is a crucial one. Only a small proportion of people who enter a migration process, or who have participated in major migration movements in the past, have had a clear perception of what they were going to encounter, or the extent to which their lives were going to change. While it is very likely that a large proportion of the individual migrants are the forerunners in a migration which will ultimately involve other members of their kin network, they are not usually able to foresee this at the time.

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  • Everyday gambling in New Zealand

    Curtis, Bruce; Wilson, Cate (2001)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    There is a sizeable body of statistics on gambling in New Zealand which points albeit unintentionally - to the everyday status of this activity. Max Abbott and Rachel Volberg, two leading figures in the rapidly growing discipline of gambling studies, note that in 15 short years there have been no less than seven surveys on gambling in New Zealand (not including a large number of university theses). These include three assessments of people's participation in gambling by the Department of Internal Affairs, plus two surveys funded by the department focusing on problem gambling. To these can be added one conducted by a regional health authority, North Health, under contract to the Committee on Problem Gambling Management and one conducted on behalf of the Casino Control Authority. This much research on gambling should suggest to the reader that there is something about gambling that piques the interest of government bureaucrats and agencies. Here the frequency of the phrase `problem gambling' is the giveaway. In this section we will review some of the findings of this research and cover its more pathological rationale later.

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  • Superantigen architecture: Functional decoration on a conserved scaffold

    Arcus, Vickery L.; Baker, Edward N. (2007)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    A defining and consistent feature of the bacterial superantigens from Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes is their strongly conserved three-dimensional structure. Structural studies to date show that the array of more than 280 amino acid sequences known for superantigens (SAgs) and staphylococcal superantigen-like (SSL) proteins all have the same fold-a structure in which the same three-dimensional arrangement of α-helices and β-sheets is traced by each amino acid sequence, with the same topology (for recent reviews, see references 29 and 43). A typical SAg structure comprises two domains-an N-terminal β -barrel domain called an OB-fold (4, 25) and a C-terminal β-grasp domain in which a long α-helix packs on to a mixed parallel and antiparallel β-sheet. These two domains are traversed by an α-helix that lies at the N terminus of the protein and packs against the β-grasp domain, thus linking the N- and C-terminal domains.

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  • Jacqueline Fahey

    Dart, William (2007)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Chez Jacqueline Fahey is a Grey Lynn bungalow. After walking past palmy luxuriance that could pass as a tropical setting for her 1998 novel, Cutting Loose, I'm soon in her front room, the wonders and delights of which would rival those of a Victorian parlour. There are additions since my last visit - beyond a 19205 screen is a vast mirror, its faux-baroque frame livened with cerulean blue from Fahey's brush. Significantly, it echoes the hue of the plastic flowers threaded through the chandelier.

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  • In search of the audience

    Zanker, Ruth; Lealand, Geoff (2010)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    We all are members of media audiences. On many occasions, we are self-consciously so – such as when we sit in darkness in a cinema, transfixed by a larger-than-life screen, sharing the experience with a group of relative strangers. More frequently, we are part of an audience through habit or circumstance. Much of our media use is habitual. We are often barely aware of it. We scan the morning newspaper, half-listen to the car radio or iPod on the journey to work or university, glance at billboards, check online daily news updates, glance at the evening news bulletin – all this happens amidst the clutter of domestic life and regular patterns of work and leisure.

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  • Introduction: Sylvia, a New Zealander

    Jones, Alison; Middleton, Sue (2009)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Sylvia Ashton-Warner had an intensely ambivalent relationship with the land of her birth. Despite receiving many accolades in New Zealand – including the country’s major literary award – she claimed to have been rejected and persecuted, and regularly announced that her educational and literary achievements were unappreciated or insufficiently acknowledged by her compatriots. In her darkest moments, she railed against New Zealand and New Zealander, even stating in one television interview: “I’m not a New Zealander!”

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  • 'Mong'st the furies finde just recompence': Suicide and the supernatural in William Sampson's The Vow Breaker (1636)

    Martin, Fiona (2015)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    The prevailing view on suicide in early modern England was that it was absolutely 'contrary to the Lawes and ordinances of God: 1 and contemporary theologians including John Sym, William Willymat, Robert Hill and Richard Greenham expounded in sermons and treatises on the prohibitions against self-murder and the dire consequences attendant upon the soul of the deceased.2 To take one's own life indirectly challenged the authority of the Church, and suicide, in its violation of community values, also awakened fears of the supernatural and of what the condemned soul might be capable. On the popular stage, of course, dramatizations of suicide could provide shocking but arresting scenes of conflict, both on the personal level and within the affected community.

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