152 results for Conference item, CPIT Repository

  • Students’ perceptions of work quality in a cooperative learning environment

    Lopez, M.; Lopez, D. (2013)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This study investigates students’ perceptions of their own work and that of others, and how these change as students work cooperatively in small groups in an active learning environment. We incorporated formal feedback into a learning cycle in which students researched topics and presented their findings to peers in small groups. We then used custom computer software to capture this feedback and students’ perceptions of the work and record these in a database. We then analysed these data to investigate students’ perception of the quality of the work, its usefulness, and the extent to which they trusted the accuracy of its findings. We found that student self-assessment and peer assessment were similar and both were relatively lenient compared to a tutor assessment. However, students with higher achievement were more severe in their self-assessment than those at lower achievement levels. We also found that perceptions did not change as the course progressed. This last finding was surprising and suggests that the students were not reflecting on the feedback they received and then acting on it to modify their approach to future research.

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  • An overview of the practice of IT governance

    Asgarkhani, M. (2013)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Investment on Information Technology (IT) solutions in most organizations accounts for the largest component of capital expenditure. Even though there are at times conflicting views on value and return regarding investment on IT, in general, there is consensus amongst strategists, planning advisors and many researchers that Investment in IT can bring significant value to business. Value is added through improved productivity, increased efficiency, profitability, better communication, more effective decision making and customer satisfaction. However, in order to maximize benefits and value gained from investment on IT, it is universally acknowledged that IT must be fully aligned with overall business strategies and direction. As capital investment on IT continues to grow, IT managers and strategists are expected to develop and put in practice effective decision making models (frameworks) that improve decision-making processes for the use of IT in organizations and optimize the investment on ICT solutions. More specifically, there is an expectation that organizations not only maximize the benefits of adopting IT solutions but also avoid the many pitfalls that are associated with rapid introduction of technological change. Different organizations depending on size, complexity of solutions required and processes used for financial management may use different techniques for managing strategic investment on IT solutions. Corporate IT governance encompasses the necessary organisational structures and processes to ensure the alignment of IT and business occurs whilst at the same time minimising any associated risks. Decision making processes for strategic use of IT within organizations are often referred to as IT Governance (or Corporate IT Governance). This research through examining and analysing recent studies aims to identify key factors for effective IT governance. The many benefits of IT governance are discussed along with suggestions for why implementation of governance systems can fail. The study examines IT governance as a tool for best practice in decision making on strategic use of IT. The study is concerned with phase I of a project intended to identify key components and success factors. It establishes that the practice of IT governance, depending on complexity of IT solutions, size of organization and organization’s stage of maturity in using IT varies significantly within various organizations. It can range from informal approaches to sophisticated formal frameworks. It is confirmed that there is no one standard framework for IT Governance that suits all organizations. Ownership and direction prove to be amongst essential elements to successful implementation of governance practices. Clearly defined roles and responsibilities tied with clear communication and continual senior management involvement were highlighted as significant success factors.

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  • Developing research and presentation skills in post graduate students

    Joyce, D.; Blackshaw, R.; Young, A. (2010)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    In this paper, techniques used with postgraduate computing students to develop research, analysis and presentation skills are explained and their success is evaluated. Several different techniques are used with students entering post graduate study at different levels. The courses at each level and the research forums are described and analysed.

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  • Assessing with a unit test framework: variations of approach

    Lance, M.; Sarkar, A.; Bian, R. (2010)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This work describes two different uses of a Unit Testing Framework for automated marking of programming assignments. Usually unit testing focuses on verifying the correctness of individual methods. Here we firstly show how to use unit tests to give novice programmers feedback as they learn how to code simple data-centric Creation, Retrieval, Updating and Deletion (CRUD) tasks. Following this there is an explanation of how advancing novice programmers can be guided to create robust methods in a complex system through the feedback from automated acceptance tests. These are novel variations of the standard use of unit tests for automatic assessment of programming assignments and showcase the possibilities for vocational focused programming courses.

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  • Leadership in ICT organizations: skills or experience?

    Asgarkhani, M.; Wan, J. (2010)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Today, access to information and communication technologies (ICTs) plays an essential role in both economic and social development. A diverse portfolio of ICT solutions is contributing towards a significant change in corporate business processes worldwide. ICT organization leadership is essential for setting up competitive businesses, managing global corporations, adding business value and providing valued products and/or services to their potential markets. Successful ICT organization leaders need to use a mix of technical skills, managerial skills and relevant management and technical experience so as to be able to provide effective leadership.

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  • Key attributes for success within the ICT job market: a case study of ICT students' view

    Asgarkhani, M.; Wan, J. (2007)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper elaborates on attributes that are seen as being critical to success within the ICT sector roles. The required attributes as identified by a study of 205 randomly selected ICT roles have been compared with students’ perception (based on the preliminary results of a study of one student focus group). Overall, there were difficulties in drawing clear conclusions from the outcome of one case study only. However, we were able to identify some key issues in both agreements and mismatches on winning attributes for future studies.

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  • Facilitating learning by using case studies

    MacGregor, A.; Nesbit, T. (2008)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    A number of issues can result in institutions seeking alternatives to industry based capstone projects in the final semester or year of three year qualifications in information and communications technology (ICT), whether they be three year degree programmes or diploma programmes such as the level 7 Diploma in Information and Communications Technology (DipICT – Level 7), formerly called the National Diploma in Business Computing (NDBC). One issue documented has been large numbers of international students as documented by a number of writers including Chard and Wempe (2004), Baker and Nesbit (2006). The issue giving rise to this paper is where a small institution has built links with industry based clients through the offering of DipICT Level 7 projects, but due to a decline in student numbers has ceased the offering of the DipICT Level 7 programme. There was however a desire to maintain the relationships that had been built with the industry based clients. The aim of this paper is to investigate the pitfalls and promise of using client case studies in a simulated work environment to fulfil learning outcome requirements in DipICT Level 6 courses so that these relationships can be maintained with industry based clients. The framework used is small classes, full work days, multiple courses being taught at the same time and multiple clients. The framework used is described. A trial implementation is reported on, and feedback analysed from client, student, tutor and administrative views. Given this feedback, modifications to the process are suggested. The paper then discusses whether there is promise for investigating using these methods in a larger situation.

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  • Students as new settlers: the policy implementation gap

    McCarthy, C.; Yoo, Y. (2010)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Given that New Zealand is experiencing a lack of skilled labour in Information Technology (IT), and that this lack is increasing in direct proportion to ongoing technological development, the government is looking to immigrants to meet this shortfall. The purpose of this paper is to explore the issues surrounding the New Zealand Government’s stated preference for meeting this shortfall in skilled labour by having highly qualified international students as new settlers/new immigrants. What actually happens to these international IT students once they are here in New Zealand and how does the New Zealand IT job market match their needs with the needs of these potential new settlers?

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  • Teaching computing and provision of IT support: a bridge too far?

    Wieck, M.; McPhee, J. (2003)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper evaluated existing models of IT support for providers of ICT tertiary education and training and other organisations. It looked at the support afforded by IT infrastructure in meeting the needs of teaching staff and their ability to deliver courses of instruction. By contrast, different models of support were examined from industry in terms of their applicability to the particular needs of the tertiary education sector. The findings so far have identified a useful basis for comparison of IT infrastructure effectiveness and highlighted likely areas of difficulty. It concludes with a discussion of alternative models of provision of IT services ending with recommendations for a more appropriate model that better reflects the particular needs of the academic environment.

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  • Where's the bling of the thing? Ethics, gaming and PBL-1

    McCarthy, D. (2007)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper describes an evaluation of PBL-Interactive (PBL-I), an authoring tool for an ethical decision making game, within the Dip ICT course, ET600 Ethics and professionalism, at Christchurch Polytechnic, Institute of Technology, (CPIT). The tool was developed through the e-Learning Collaborative Development Fund (eCDF) for use in online and face to face delivery. While the prototype was developed and the usability testing conducted with student volunteers returned positive results, the limitations of the authoring tool in a multilinear gaming environment outweighed its affordances. In particular, the authoring mode interface lacked ease of use and functionality for advanced features such as video and audio required to develop multiple ethical choices to motivate students with advanced gaming experience in online and face to face learning environments.

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  • The City in a Different Light: rethinking the political through education by means of performance by people with intellectual disabilities

    McCaffrey, M. (2013)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

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  • Developing and running a photographic website

    Nesbit, T.; Oliver, R.; Hancock, M.; Nesbit, G. (2005)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper describes how a website was successfully developed for a Wellington-based photography business by a student completing the Graduate Diploma in eCommerce at Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology during 2004. The business specialises in photography of athletics and other sporting events throughout New Zealand, and it had been identified that a website that allowed the easy uploading of photos by the business so that customers could order copies would enhance the operations of the business. A group of students developed an initial prototype of the website as part of course work in the first semester of 2004 as an initial feasibility test and requirements gathering process. Two of these students developed the concept further as part of their cooperative education project at the end of that semester. A third student redeveloped the site in semester two of 2004 with the purpose of the site going live before the end of 2004. The site was launched successfully in late 2004.

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  • Techlabs virtually four years on

    Correia, E.; Watson, R. (2008)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Techlabs is a network the authors implemented some years ago in order to provide a rich learning environment through the use of virtualisation. They outlined the background to and reasons for employing virtualisation in a paper to the conference of the National Advisory Committee on Computing Qualifications (NACCQ) in 2004. In this paper they now describe some of the changes they have introduced during the past four years, in the context of recent developments and the widespread adoption, both in industry and the academic sector, of virtualisation of one form or another.

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  • The Capstone Project - a foundation for work?

    Wieck, M. (2003)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper represents an attempt to gauge the effectiveness of the student work placement that forms a compulsory part of the Bachelor of Information and Communication Technologies (BICT) taught at Christchurch Polytechnic Institution of Technology (CPIT). In this paper, the effectiveness will be judged in terms of how well it appears to prepare students for work within the IT industry. A survey is used given to students to establish how well they felt prepared for the workplace before and after the project and hence how they feel the placement contributes to their preparedness. Two areas are examined; specific, technical preparedness and more general competencies such as time-management, interpersonal or social skills. The study is not exhaustive, but responses are believed to reasonably represent a majority of BICT students both past and present. Further study along this path will incorporate more detailed analysis of how the employers and academic supervisors feel the project affected the student’s knowledge and skill formation.

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  • Rationalising Student Numbers in Degree and Diploma Courses: The CPIT Experience

    McCarthy, C.; Nesbit, T. (2008)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT) delivers both its three year BICT degree and the two year level 6 DipICT programme in parallel with sufficient student numbers to justify the two separate programmes. Both qualifications even go so far as to have three areas of specialisation or streams – network administration, programming and multimedia. However, from time to time, there have been subject areas in one or both of the two programmes specialisation areas that have been low enough to make it difficult to justify to CPIT administrators running some of these courses. The fact that these subject areas were required by industry became increasingly difficult to satisfy the administrators’ requirements to meet budgetary constraints. The Programme Leaders of the two programmes of study examined ways and means to provide students with a range of course and specialisation choices that also satisfied industry’s need for graduates and the administrators’ budgetary compliance requirements. This paper looks at the various proposals created by the two Programme Leaders over the past two years.

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  • NACCQ qualifications - a preformance review and future developments

    Roberton, G.; Ross, J. (2003)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    In 1986 a committee, consisting of industry and polytechnic computing representatives, was formed to design a new qualification in computing that would replace the outdated New Zealand Certificate in Data Processing (NZCDP). As a result the Certificate in Business Computing (CBC) programme, a radical new approach to computing education incorporating competencybased assessment, was offered nationally in polytechnics for the first time in 1988. The National Advisory Committee on Computing Qualifications (NACCQ), formed to replace the NZCDP review committee, continued with the development of the Advanced Certificate in Business Computing (ACBC), introduced in 1989, and the National Diploma in Business Computing (NDBC), introduced the following year. The organisation has continued to strive to serve its member institutions over the last fifteen years by endeavouring to keep up with, and ahead of, developments in the rapidly changing field of Information and Communications Technology (ICT). This paper presents the findings from a comprehensive survey of NACCQ sector affiliates (includes Polytechnics and Universities) on which NACCQ qualifications and modules are currently being offered. It focuses on the question of whether the organisation is currently perceived to be addressing the needs of its members, and those of the ICT industry, in terms of the content of the current edition of the New Zealand Qualifications in Information and Communications Technology (the Blue Book).

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  • A standards-based approach to federated identity

    Lopez, M.; Mann, S.; Peppiatt, J.; Sewell, A.; Stott, C. (2006)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Federated Identity allows users to access multiple services at different organisations with the same credentials. In this paper, we summarise key work currently being carried out on Federated Identity. We evaluate several existing and suggested schemes and propose a new standards-based platform-neutral design pattern that uses current mature technologies and is suitable for the implementation of federated identity in a business-tobusiness context. The design pattern is verified with a practical implementation at two polytechnics.

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  • Staff and student perceptions of NZQA level expectations

    Lopez, M.; Lopez, D. (2013)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    In this cross-sectional study, we surveyed 89 students from four courses to elicit their expectations of the nature of the skills and knowledge, and the degree of self-management and collaboration, which was required for their courses. We compared their responses to the expectations set out in the New Zealand Qualifications Framework. We also sampled a small number (6) of lecturers and compared their expectations to those of students and the framework. We found significant differences between student and framework expectations, with student expectations noticeably lower than the framework. Moreover, student expectations remained at a low level, even in higher level courses, and the gap was wider at the higher levels. We also found significant differences between student and lecturer expectations. Lecturer expectations were broadly between those of students and the framework, which suggests that lecturer expectations are a compromise between both of these. Any misalignment of expectations poses a challenge for educators. We suggest practical measures for aligning these expectations.

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  • An exploratory study into the impact of NACCQ research

    Clear, T.; Young, A. (2006)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper reports the findings of a preliminary investigation into the impact of research within the New Zealand National Advisory Committee on Computing Qualifications (NACCQ) sector. Using a strategy based predominantly upon keyword search of academic reference databases, the study found that NACCQ projects and publications are beginning to be cited in diverse outlets, and are now making a contribution to the international literature in the computing disciplines. The study and its findings are briefly reviewed and the outlets in which NACCQ research has been cited are tabulated. This paper establishes the first profile of international citations for NACCQ research and provides a replicable baseline for subsequent studies into the impact of research originating in the sector.

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  • The game’s the thing: Levelling up from novice status

    McCarthy, D P.; Oliver, R. (2014)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Quality computer engineering education is integral to the recruitment, retention, and employment of quality software engineers, as part of enabling a greater uptake of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) careers. The introductory programing course DICT440 uses Build Your Own Blocks (BYOB) and the team creation of a game, Theseus and the Minotaur, to teach introductory programing principles and skills. This paper argues that creativity is essential to innovation. Digital Games are being increasingly used in education and training internationally, as well as specifically in computer education. Aotearoa-New Zealand ITPs need to position themselves positively to leverage the creativity and motivation of software engineering students who are experienced gamers by developing games as part of teaching and learning software engineering. Computer game development courses can be developed collaboratively in a multi-disciplinary team, using appropriate learning theory, across ITPs in second and third year degree courses, in conjunction with regional game companies, alongside core business applications.

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