1,179 results for Conference item, ResearchCommons@Waikato

  • The first time-derivative of the EEG: A possible proxy for the order-parameter for the cerebral cortex

    Sleigh, James W.; Steyn-Ross, D. Alistair; Steyn-Ross, Moira L. (1998)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Many important aspects of the function of the cerebral cortex can be captured in a two dimensional lattice model. From this analogy, the change from the awake state to the unconscious state can be understood as a form of order/disorder phase transition . If this is so, there should exist an order-parameter that has zero value when the cortex is disordered (the anaesthetic state), and which rapidly climbs to an arbitrary positive value when the cortex becomes ordered (the awake state). Although the `spatially-meaned soma potential' v of the cortex, relative to its unconscious state value v0, can be considered to be the order-parameter, it is not possible to measure the mean soma potential directly. However, fluctuations in the soma potential give rise to the time-varying EEG signal v(t) which is easily measured.

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  • Differentiated instruction in technology education

    Prankerd, Sheena; Lockley, John (2011)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Differentiated instruction is the concept of teaching to individual students acknowledging their individual strengths, weaknesses and learning styles. The call for differentiated instruction classrooms is echoed in both an appreciation of students as individuals as well as at the systems level through results of international exit surveys such as the PISA study. Differentiated learning calls for a move away from an industrialist model of the classroom, where the same programme (instructional activities and assessment structures) are applied to all students, to a model where we consider learning and assessment programmes to suit individual learners needs. A move to differentiated instruction to allow differentiated learning to occur in the classroom has implications on school structures and vision, professional learning for teachers and teacher practice at the classroom and departmental levels. The role of assessment in teaching and learning is also critical in the functioning of a differentiated learning classroom. This paper discusses the factors involved in setting up a differentiated learning classroom and is supported by a presentation of classroom examples.

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  • He rongo i te reo rauriki, i te reo reiuru – Discourse analysis and conversations of historical conservation in New Zealand newspapers

    Whaanga, Hēmi; Wehi, Priscilla M. (2015-11-23)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Biocultural conservation encompasses all forms of diversity: biological, cultural and linguistic. This requires the nurturing of human cultures, customs, languages, knowledge, and the plants and animals on which they depend. The current biodiversity crisis in Aotearoa and worldwide has led to wide ranging debate about environmental management and the cost of conservation. For Māori, however, much more than species diversity is at stake. In Te Ao Māori, people are linked directly to flora and fauna through whakapapa (ancestry). As such, conservation can be viewed, not in terms of preserving ‘otherness’, but in terms of preserving ‘us-ness’: our very selfhood. We use discourse analysis to examine the concept of ‘conservation’ in 19thC Aotearoa, and how this is perceived by Māori communities in particular. To investigate these relationships, we deconstruct and re-examine the notion of conservation and the range of interpretations associated with it that are evident in both Māori and English language newspapers published between 1840s and the early part of the 20thC. We highlight discussion of species that we have identified as culturally significant from an analysis of whakataukī, ancestral sayings that are an important part of Māori oral tradition. Our analyses focus on the complex inter-relationships between language, society and changing conservation thought in Aotearoa in the late 19th century, and how Māori society engaged with this concept.

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  • Māori Astronomy and Matariki

    Whaanga, Hēmi (2015-12-02)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Presented at the Māori Astronomy and Matariki to Year 10 Hamilton Girls’ High School Camp.

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  • [Keynote] Feeling in / out of place: Queer geographies of belongings

    Johnston, Lynda (2016)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Thank you for this opportunity to be part of your day. It’s a real honour to be here. I am excited by the theme ‘welcoming diversity’ as it sums up my approach to my professional and personal life. I have a long standing research interest in gender and sexual diverse people and places. At the heart of my approach is a commitment to a politics of difference. My presentation today will highlight this diversity at the levels of our bodies, communities, regions, and globally. I am going to give you a snap shot of research I have conducted over the past couple of decades that connects welcoming (or not welcoming) diversity with embodied feelings of being in / and or / out of place.

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  • 'You can't use that bathroom': Transgendering public toilets

    Johnston, Lynda (2016)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    This presentation discusses transgender people’s experiences of public toilets. I draw on interviews from my research project ‘Gender Variant Geographies’ to consider the costs of binary gendered – male and female - bathrooms. When public space is rigidly gendered, access and use is a concern for trans and/or gender non-conforming people. There are many gender variant bodies that do not fit a two sex model. There are also people who exhibit gendered characteristics that do not align with the expected performances of their sexed body. I report on findings from interviews with over 20 participants who were asked about their experiences of public toilets. Hostile reactions towards gender transgressions in bathrooms bring into stark relief the performative and material consequences of binary gender norms. Queer and transgender theories are used to analyse: first, ‘the bathroom problem’; second, cisgender privilege; and third, acts of policing gendered bathrooms and bodies.

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  • Unions and the ‘knowledge society’

    Piercy, Gemma Louise (2003)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the outcomes of the 1999 Labour Party Manifesto Skills for 21st Century: the Tertiary Education Strategy (TES), the Statement of Tertiary Education Priorities (STEP) 2003-2004, and the industry training review. Specifically, the paper evaluates the role of unions within the post-compulsory education and training sector (PCET). Thus the paper: analyses the policy changes in post-compulsory education and training, particularly that relating to industry training; reviews, briefly, international literature which focuses on the role of unions in post-compulsory education and training; and assesses the extent to which the re-introduction of unions can contribute to the necessary capacity building needed to overcome 10 years of marginalisation.

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  • Learning to describe data in actions

    Maulsby, David; Witten, Ian H. (1995)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Traditional machine learning algorithms have failed to serve the needs of systems for Programming by Demonstration (PBD), which require interaction with a user (a teacher) and a task environment. We argue that traditional learning algorithms fail for two reasons: they do not cope with the ambiguous instructions that users provide in addition to examples; and their learning criterion requires only that concepts classify examples to some degree of accuracy, ignoring the other ways in which an active agent might use concepts. We show how a classic concept learning algorithm can be adapted for use in PBD by replacing the learning criterion with a set of instructional and utility criteria, and by replacing a statistical preference bias with a set of heuristics that exploit user hints and background knowledge to focus attention.

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  • Active templates: Manipulating pointers with pictures

    Lyons, Paul J.; Apperley, Mark; Bishop, A.G.; Moretti, G.S (1994)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Active templates are a semi-automatic visual mechanism for generating algorithms for manipulating pointer-based data structures. The programmer creates a picture showing the affected part of a data structure before and after a general-case manipulation. Code for the operation is compiled directly from the picture, which also provides the development environment with enough information to generate, automatically, a series of templates for other similar pictures, each describing a different configuration which the data structure may possess. The programmer completes the algorithm by creating matching after-pictures for each of these cases. At every stage, most of the picture-generation is automatic. Much of the tedious detail of conventional pointer-based data-structure manipulation, such as maintenance of current pointers, is unnecessary in a system based on active templates.

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  • Compressing semi-structured text using hierarchical phrase identification

    Nevill-Manning, Craig G.; Witten, Ian H.; Olsen, Dan R., Jr. (1996)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Many computer files contain highly-structured, predictable information interspersed with information which has less regularity and is therefore less predictable—such as free text. Examples range from word-processing source files, which contain precisely-expressed formatting specifications enclosing tracts of natural-language text, to files containing a sequence of filled-out forms which have a predefined skeleton clothed with relatively unpredictable entries. These represent extreme ends of a spectrum. Word-processing files are dominated by free text, and respond well to general-purpose compression techniques. Forms generally contain database-style information, and are most appropriately compressed by taking into account their special structure. But one frequently encounters intermediate cases. For example, in many email messages the formal header and the informal free-text content are equally voluminous. Short SGML files often contain comparable amounts of formal structure and informal text. Although such files may be compressed quite well by general-purpose adaptive text compression algorithms, which will soon pick up the regular structure during the course of normal adaptation, better compression can often be obtained by methods that are equipped to deal with both formal and informal structure.

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  • Stop 2 Kainui silt loam and Naike clay, Gordonton Rd

    Lowe, David J. (2008)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    At this stop are several remarkable features both stratigraphic and pedological, and a “two-storied” soil, the Kainui silt loam alongside (in just a few places) the Naike clay. Both soils are Ultisols. The sequence of tephra beds and buried soil horizons spanning about 1 million years was exposed in 2007 by road works.

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  • Towards a TCT-inspired electronics concept inventory

    Scott, Jonathan B.; Harlow, Ann; Peter, Mira (2014)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    This study reports on the initial work on the use of Threshold Concept Theory (TCT) to develop a threshold-concept inventory – a catalogue of the important concepts that underlie electronics and electrical engineering (EE) – and an assessment tool – to investigate the depth of student understanding of threshold and related concepts, independent of students’ numerical ability and knowledge mimicry in the first-year course in electrical engineering. This is both challenging and important for several reasons: there is a known issue with student retention (Tsividis, 1998; 2009); the discipline is relatively hard for students because it concerns invisible phenomena; and finally it is one that demands deep understanding from the very start (Scott, Harlow, Peter, and Cowie, 2010). Although the focus of this research was on electronic circuits, findings regarding teaching and learning of threshold concepts (TCs) will inform lecturers in three other disciplines who are part of our project on threshold concepts.

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  • Radial evolution of cross helicity at low and high latitudes in the solar wind

    Breech, Ben; Matthaeus, William H.; Minnie, J.; Oughton, Sean; Parhi, S.; Bieber, J.W.; Bavassano, B. (2005)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    We employ a turbulence transport theory to the radial evolution of the solar wind at both low and high latitudes. The theory includes cross helicity, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence, and driving by shear and pickup ions. The radial decrease of cross helicity, observed in both low and high latitudes, can be accounted for by including sufficient shear driving to overcome the tendency of MHD turbulence to produce Alfvénic states. The shear driving is weaker at high latitudes leading to a slower evolution. Model results are compared with observations from Ulysses and Voyager.

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  • A teaching and support tool for building formal models of graphical user-interfaces

    Reeves, Steve (1996)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    In this paper we propose the design of a tool that will allow the construction of a formal, textual description of a software system even if it has a graphical user-interface as a component. An important aspect of this design is that it can be used for two purposes-the teaching of first-order logic and the formal specification of graphical user-interfaces. The design has been suggested by considering a system that has already been very successful for teaching first-order logic, namely Tarski's World.

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  • Developing community and social psychology for Aotearoa: Experiences from a New Zealand programme of indigenization

    Thomas, David R. (1994-08)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Experiences related to developing an indigenous community and social psychology in the teaching of psychology at the University of Waikato in Aotearoa/New Zealand are described. The process of localization emphasizes the need to interpret "universal" concepts in terms of local cultural patterns and to elaborate psychological concepts derived from the cultures of indigenous peoples. The localization of psychology in New Zealand involves: (a) differences between the dominant United States cultural pattern, in which much English-language psychology is embedded, and New Zealand cultural patterns; and (b) differences between the dominant Pakeha (Anglo-New Zealander) cultural patterns and the cultural patterns of indigenous Maori peoples. These cultural differences involve contrasts between individualistic and collective conceptions of self-identities and social identities, and alternative conceptions of community needs. Three processes relevant to localization are outlined: socio-cultural contextualization, agenda-setting, and knowledge of cultural styles. Socio-cultural contextualization refers to the relevance of psychological knowledge, taught in dominant national institutions, to local social, cultural and political systems. Agenda-setting focuses on how the dominant themes in teaching and research within psychology are selected, and the relevance of these themes to community needs. Knowledge of local cultural styles is required to describe and teach professional roles that are congruent with such cultural styles.

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  • The use of Māori mythology in clinical settings: Training issues and needs

    Cherrington, Lisa (2003)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Within therapeutic settings, narrative approaches are increasingly being used as a way of creating new understandings and new stories. This paper discusses the use of purakau as a Māori focused intervention when working with Māori tangata whaiora (clients) and their whānau. This paper will outline the rationale and relevance of using purakau with Māori. However, the emphasis is on the training provided to clinicians in the use of purakau. An outline of the training process is provided. In doing so, issues regarding the use of these taonga (treasures) in clinical psychology will be raised. It will be argued that Māori mythology must have a place in the kete of Māori psychology.

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  • Integrating Cyc and Wikipedia: Folksonomy meets rigorously defined common-sense

    Medelyan, Olena; Legg, Catherine (2008)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Integration of ontologies begins with establishing mappings between their concept entries. We map categories from the largest manually-built ontology, Cyc, onto Wikipedia articles describing corresponding concepts. Our method draws both on Wikipedia’s rich but chaotic hyperlink structure and Cyc’s carefully defined taxonomic and common-sense knowledge. On 9,333 manual alignments by one person, we achieve an F-measure of 90%; on 100 alignments by six human subjects the average agreement of the method with the subject is close to their agreement with each other. We cover 62.8% of Cyc categories relating to common-sense knowledge and discuss what further information might be added to Cyc given this substantial new alignment.

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  • Interface of gender and culture

    Tamasese, Kiwi (1993)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    I greet you in the soothing waters of the Pacific. The birth waters of Hawai’i to the North, island of the dream time, and Aotearoa, to the south. Papua New Guinea to the West and Marquesas to the East. These islands are the gathering places of the world’s largest Continent, the Pacific. We of this continent know that her birth waters are our connection. We also know that she is woman identified. It is no surprise therefore that from Hawai’i to the north to Aotearoa in the south the positioning of women in each of these societies bears a different story to that of the women of the continent of Europe. This reality lived out in Hawai’i means women shared with men the ultimate leadership of peoples. This location of women power is named Kuhinanui. Many remarkable women of Hawai’i occupied this position. From times of peace throughout to the first clash with imposed new culture, women of Hawai’i led, bled, struggled, defied and kept the kukui of self belief burning. Genealogically Hawai’i is connected to her other sisters throughout the Pacific. The story of Kuhinanui Liliuokalani is poignant.

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  • Can the mana of Maori men who sexually abuse children be restored?

    Webb, Mate; Jones, David Trevor (2008)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    The problem of child sex abuse is prevalent across all segments of society, and Maori, unfortunately, are overrepresented in this problem. In the total prison population of 6591, 13.6% are identified as child sex offenders. Of the 3,299 Maori in prison 283 (8.5%) are identified as child sex offenders whereas 631 (18.6%) of the 3292 non-Maori have been so identified. However, Maori only represent approximately 15% of the general population. In proportionate terms, approximately one of every 970 Maori men is currently in prison for child sex offences, while for non-Maori that figure is one in 31251. Also, disclosures from offenders suggest that sexual abuse is particularly common in rural or disadvantaged areas, with offenders frequently reporting being abused by multiple offenders and being aware of chronic abuse, little of which was ever reported.

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  • Sleuths and Spies: the rise of the 'Everywoman' in detective and thriller fiction of the 1920s

    Bydder, Jillene; Franks, Rachel (2013)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    The 1920s, frequently referred to as the ‘Roaring Twenties’ or the ‘Jazz Age’, are often associated with opulent lifestyles and the emergence of striking fashion and furniture trends. Themes in the history of women in crime and thriller fiction show, however, that this decade was also a difficult period in the West, one of widespread financial hardship and of living in the shadow of social turmoil: anti-Semitism, conspiracy theories and fear of the foreign dominated the mainstream press as well as popular fiction. It was also a period in which women were working to navigate their way through a society changed forever by the experience of war. This paper examines some of the well-known detective and thriller fiction writers of the 1920s – Agatha Christie, Dorothy L. Sayers, John Buchan and William Le Queux – and shows how their characters chart the sexualisation of women as well as women’s resistance to the prevailing views of the day. Fictional women of this period represent ‘Everywoman’: independent and intelligent and, most importantly, sleuths and spies in their own right.

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