2,297 results for Conference item, ResearchSpace@Auckland

  • Study on optical fiber sensing for detecting liquid penetration into anti-corrosive resins

    Hashimoto, Y; Hioka, Yusuke; Kubouchi, M (2015-03-28)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Anti-corrosive thermosetting resins are commonly used in chemical plants to prevent corrosion failure of chemical equipment. As they are often used in contact with corrosive liquid for a long time, liquid penetration into the resins causes problems. On-line sensing to detect the penetrating liquid into the resins is useful to prevent accidents caused by the liquid reaching to the crucial parts of the chemical equipment and to estimate the life-time of the equipment. Penetration behavior of the liquid in an anti-corrosive resin can be described by Fick’s second law, which includes the diffusion coefficient. The method proposed in this study estimates the diffusion coefficient using optical fiber sensor modules embedded in the different depths of the anticorrosive resin while the surface of the anti-corrosive resin is immersed in the liquid. The optical fiber sensor modules contain pH indicators on the light path of the fiber and the spectrum of the transmitted light is monitored. The diffusion coefficient is estimated from the difference between the time instants where the two sensor modules detect the liquid penetration. Nevertheless the diffusion coefficient estimated by the proposed method in an experiment was about 40% smaller than that estimated by a conventional off-line measurement, the study reveals that the proposed method is able to estimate the diffusion coefficient by on-line manner. To further improve the estimation accuracy, the effect of the assumption set for the liquid concentration of the resin, which would have caused the error, is also discussed.

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  • HIV/AIDS and tourism: A qualitative approach

    Frey, Rosemary; Lewis, KA (2005)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • In-plane Response of Post-tensioned Concrete Masonry

    Laursen, P; Ingham, Jason (2000-07-01)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    In-plane response of post-tensioned concrete masonry (PCM) walls with unbonded tendons is examined by means of analytical modelling and full-scale structural testing. Initially, the construction principle using prestressing in conjunction with fully grouted concrete masonry is described, with brief discussion of the implicated materials. Then the key features of unbonded post-tensioning are highlighted in the context of structural performance during seismic loading. Subsequently, two analytical models for prediction of the in-plane force-displacement response, based on engineering mechanics and finite element methods, are presented and verified through comparison with results from full-scale laboratory testing. The paper concludes with brief remarks on how these studies are expected to lead to seismic design provisions that take into account the structural behaviour of PCM walls which utilise unbonded tendons and are characterised by rocking.

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  • Material Properties for New Zealand Concrete Masonry

    Laursen, Peter; Ingham, Jason (2001)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    The objective of this paper is to discuss appropriate material properties for grouted concrete masonry manufactured in New Zealand, with particular emphasis given to the use of these parameters when designing prestressed concrete masonry (PCM) walls. The discussion primarily targets the concrete masonry crushing strength, modulus of elasticity and strain capacity, seen from a New Zealand perspective. Strength and strain enhancement of the wall compression zone due to confinement is also discussed. A review of criteria from current international research and masonry design standards is included. It is noted that the term ‘PCM’ in this paper refers to post-tensioned walls with unbonded tendons, suitable for ductile seismic design.

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  • Cyclic Strut & Tie Modelling Of Simple Reinforced Concrete Members

    To, NH; Ingham, Jason; Sritharan, S (2000)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    The study reported in the current research paper represents an initial attempt to develop simple strut-and-tie model (stm) formation procedures, which allow the cyclic hysteretic response of reinforced concrete structures to be examined. An idealised uniaxial fibre model was firstly constructed to simulate the axial force-displacement characteristic of a combined concrete and steel reinforcing element. This model was subsequently employed as the top and bottom chord members in the later constructed stm. Nonlinear computer analysis of the newly developed stm was performed using drain-2dx. Analytical output was found to satisfactorily match the experimentally measured force-displacement response. However, several deficiencies of the model required further study.

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  • Making 3D Work: A Classification of Visual Depth Cues, 3D Display Technologies and Their Applications

    Mehrabi, Mostafa; Peek, Edward; Wuensche, Burkhard; Lutteroth, C (2013)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    3D display technologies improve perception and interaction with 3D scenes, and hence can make applications more effective and efficient. This is achieved by simulating depth cues used by the human visual system for 3D perception. The type of employed depth cues and the characteristics of a 3D display technology affect its usability for different applications. In this paper we review, analyze and categorize 3D display technologies and applications, with the goal of assisting application developers in selecting and exploiting the most suitable technology. Our first contribution is a classification of depth cues that incorporates their strengths and limitations. These factors have not been considered in previous contributions, but they are important considerations when selecting depth cues for an application. The second contribution is a classification of display technologies that highlights their advantages and disadvantages, as well as their requirements. We also provide examples of suitable applications for each technology. This information helps system developers to select an appropriate display technology for their applications.

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  • The Interface of Genre Knowledge and Metacognition in Researching, Teaching and Learning English in New Times: Invited Featured Address

    Zhang, Lawrence (2013-11-02)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This presentation aims to bring together two notions, genre and metacognition, for better informing classroom-based teaching and learning of English at university settings. To me incorporating genre and metacognition is essential to the pedagogy the teacher has adopted or is developing in “New Times”. Genre is a complicated concept, a term used by scholars and teachers to mean different things. It is used in literary/literature analysis with a meaning different from what literacy/language educators and academic writing researchers are acquainted with (see Devitt, 2004; Swales, 1990). In linguistics and literacy/language education, Bakhtin’s basic observations were of “speech genres” (the idea of heteroglossia), modes of speaking or writing that people learn to mimic, weave together, and manipulate (e.g., formal letters, grocery list, university lectures, or personal anecdotes; see Christie, 2013; Hyland, 2005; Swales, 1990; Zhang, 2013). In this sense genres are socially specified, which are recognized and defined (often informally) by a particular culture or community. According to Norman Fairclough (2003), genre has a similar concept that emphasizes the social context of the text: Genres are “different ways of (inter)acting discoursally” (p. 26). More significantly, the genre of a text may be determined at least by its four aspects, which include linguistic function, formal traits, textual organization, and relation of communicative situation to formal and organizational traits of the text (Halliday & Hasan, 1989; Halliday & Mattiessen, 2004; Hyland, 2013). The other key notion is metacognition. Despite a plethora of definitions about metacognition in the field of psychology, the core elements concern primarily knowledge or beliefs about what factors or variables act and interact in what ways to affect the course and outcome of cognitive enterprises. As applied to second language research on teaching and learning, Wenden (1998) and Macaro (2006), among others, recognize the significance of understanding students’ metacognition about the multifarious aspects of language learning, stressing that this knowledge base can help teachers facilitate L2 students’ language development (Zhang, 2003). In the context of metacognition, I briefly review and critique the relevance of genre as used in the three areas mentioned above, i.e., literature, literacy education and academic writing, to teaching English for academic purposes (Zhang, 2010, 2011). I intend to emphasize the importance of genre knowledge and metacognition as they relate to the English textbooks being used and the real world in which university students work as well as the way English is taught and learned. My overarching aim is to maximize the effectiveness of learning and teaching. (Zhang & Ben Said, 2013).

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  • Promoting Diversity in the TESOL Family: Transcending the NEST-NNEST Divide in TESOL: Voices from TESOL’s NNEST Interest Section

    Zhang, Lawrence (2013-03-22)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Transcending the NEST-NNEST Divide in TESOL: Voices from TESOL’s NNEST Interest Section: Invited Panellist Paper delivered in the academic session "Promoting Diversity in the TESOL Family: Issues and Challenges"At TESOL 2012, a survey of the membership was conducted seeking to illuminate perceptions of diversity in TESOL and the challenges faced in relation to inclusion/inclusiveness. In this session, invited representatives from TESOL Interest Sections and Forums will speak to themes that arose from a preliminary analysis of survey responses.

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  • Researching NNEST Identity for a Brave New World

    Zhang, Lawrence (2013-06-14)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Excellence in Language Learner/Learning Strategy Research and Strategy-based Instruction: Asian ELLs and the Effects of Self-regulation-oriented Strategy-based Writing Instruction on Their Writing Quality

    Zhang, Lawrence (2012-03-29)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Asian ELLs and the Effects of Self-regulation-oriented Strategy-based Writing Instruction on Their Writing Quality: paper delivered in the Nonnative English-speaking Teachers in TESOL (NNEST) Interest Section Academic Session, "Excellence in Language Learner/Learning Strategy Research and Strategy-based Instruction" More than 30 years of language learner/learning strategy research and practice have been well-recognized to be able to inform classroom pedagogy. This session brings together leading scholars in the field to share their recent findings, curricular/pedagogical practices, and insights into future directions for TESOL researchers, educators, and classroom teachers.

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  • Scope and Enhancement of Linguistic and Methodological Knowledge for Teachers: What Knowledge Base Do Teachers Need for Effective Classroom Teaching?

    Zhang, Lawrence (2012)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    What Knowledge Base Do Teachers Need for Effective Classroom Teaching? Invited featured paper delivered in the TESOL Intersection Session, "Scope and Enhancement of Linguistic and Methodological Knowledge for Teachers" Drawing on their extensive research and teaching experience, the panelists discuss, with concrete examples, what types of linguistic and methodological knowledge (i.e., knowledge in grammar, lexis, pragmatics, etc.) are essential for TESOL professionals and how teachers can enhance such knowledge to make their teaching more successful.

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  • Rock Typing In Geothermal Reservoirs, Challenging The Complexity

    Prieto, AM; Mielke, P; Archer, Rosalind; Sneider, JS; Misra, S (2014)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    In order to simulate the behaviour of a geothermal system for field management purposes, a numerical model is initialised based on conceptual models that capture the initial state of the reservoir, integrating the current knowledge of the system and its dynamics. Geothermal reservoirs are dynamic systems, where continuous fluid and heat flow affects the reservoir chemical and stress equilibria leading to precipitation or dissolution of minerals and changes in the pore geometry over the lifetime of geothermal activity. The speed and intensity of these changes depend on the rock’s capacity to store and transfer fluids coupled with the physicochemical properties of the fluids and the pressure and temperature of the system. The rocks resulting from these processes are characterized by a wide range of petrophysical properties, which are seldom represented by traditional classification of rocks based on individual geological parameters of genesis, lithology or composition. As a consequence, translating these properties into quantitative inputs for numerical models remains a challenge. This paper presents the conventional approach to petrophysical characterisation of geothermal reservoirs in New Zealand, and proposes the use of textural descriptors as part of a rock typing technique aimed at facilitating the quantification and use of measured petrophysical properties in the reservoir modelling workflow.

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  • Ductile Response of Post-tensioned Concrete Masonry Wall

    Laursen, P; Ingham, Jason (1999)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This paper presents the results of a series of post-tensioned concrete masonry wall tests conducted at the University of Auckland. Five single storey test specimens were subjected to in-plane cyclic loading. The fully grouted post-tensioned concrete masonry walls performed in a highly ductile manner, dominated by flexural response and base rocking. Partially grouted specimens demonstrated significant ductility capacity, despite shear strength degradation. High levels of masonry shear strength were recorded due to the post-tensioning force. Predictions of flexural and shear strength are compared with the experimental results.

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  • Active phonological units: Parsimony in sublexical errors

    Brown, Jason (2001)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Translating inclusion into influence in Aotearoa/New Zealand: The conundrum of engaging gender organisations in public policy.. 26-28 June 2013. p.1-26.

    Simon-Kumar, Rachel (2013)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Brand 'inclusion' in New Zealand: Making cultural pluralism work for emerging economy relationships.

    Simon-Kumar, Rachel (2012)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Inclusion has framed social policy in New Zealand for well over a decade, both through what are seen as the ‘boom years’ of the left Coalition Helen Clark government (1999-2008) and the recessionary period during the moderate right National-led government (2008- present). This emphasis on inclusion is particularly significant in the late 20th and early 21st century as the population in New Zealand diversified with increased volumes of in-migration from Asia that has had marked social and political implications. By and large, New Zealand has embraced its growing diversity; as nation-states in Europe tighten regulations around multicultural expression and a enforce common national identity, New Zealand continues to encourage policy frameworks that acknowledge cultural pluralism. This paper explores the antecedents underpinning the rhetoric of diversity in New Zealand, and their implications for its contemporary practice. It argues that the government’s framework of cultural pluralism has not emerged fortuitously but rather is located at a particular historical moment of the country’s transition. In the past decade New Zealand has been reinventing its geo-political identity as an Asia-Pacific nation. Central to this repositioning has been its developing relationships with emerging economies like China and India; these links have informed a view of diversity that is heavily imbued with bilateral economic and political expediency. This paper points to the opportunities and limitations of ‘neoliberal’ multiculturalism in the New Zealand state’s domestic policies.

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  • Facebook Groups: Perception and Usage among Undergraduates in the Context of Learning

    Hong, Ee; Whitehead, Lesley (2014)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This study presents and evaluates the educational potentials and benefits that Social Network Services (SNSs) offer to students in the higher education context. Based on Social Learning Theory, we explored students’ perception and learning activities in Facebook Groups (i.e. Facebook Learning Groups), and the learning and affective benefits that SNSs offer to students. We further explored the influence of four attributes (i.e. self-efficacy, trust, privacy and presence of teaching members) in moderating individuals’ perception and learning activities on SNSs. Results from a survey accompanied by data collected from a Facebook Learning Group demonstrate the usefulness of these learning groups. Findings also indicate that trust and presence of teaching members do play influential roles in affecting students’ perception and usage of Facebook Learning Groups.

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  • Prosody perception, reading accuracy, nonliteral language comprehension, and music and tonal pitch discrimination in school aged children

    Kalathottukaren, RT; Purdy, Suzanne; Ballard, Elaine (2014)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Twenty-five school aged children with normal hearing were tested on their perception of prosody using the receptive prosody subtests of the Profiling Elements of Prosody in Speech-Communication (PEPS-C) and Child Paralanguage subtest of Diagnostic Analysis of Non Verbal Accuracy 2 (DANVA 2). Performance of four children with hearing loss on the two prosody measures was compared with performance of normal hearing children. Children were also tested on their reading accuracy, comprehension of nonliteral language, and music and tonal pitch discrimination. Overall results showed that younger children aged 7;1 to 9;11 years had significantly poorer scores than 10;1 to 12;11 year olds on the Contrastive Stress Reception subtest of PEPS-C and the DANVA 2 Child Paralanguage subtest, indicating a developmental effect on speech prosody perception. Children with hearing loss had poorer scores and greater variability on PEPS-C and DANVA 2 assessments compared to normal hearing controls. Statistically significant correlations were observed between prosody perception scores and musical pitch perception and reading measures for the normal hearing group. This is consistent with previous studies showing links between reading and prosody perception [7,8]. Significant correlation between prosody perception and musical pitch discrimination indicates that pitch is an important cue for prosody perception.

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  • Perceptions of ICT: An Exploration of Gender Differences.

    Gardner, L; Sheridan, Donald; Tian, X (2014-06-22)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This paper describes a study which addresses the aptitude and aspirations of both genders when choosing an information and communication technology (ICT) career. While it is widely understood why females do not choose ICT careers, we have observed that there are also differences between the genders in self-confidence when using ICT. As a consequence this paper fills a research gap by comparing both genders on their self-efficacy, their career aspirations and their external influences. We report findings that are both interesting and contra-indicatory.

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  • Model tests of wind turbines in wind tunnels

    Flay, Richard (2014-10-20)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    ISBN 978-83-932544-9-1

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