2,300 results for Conference item, ResearchSpace@Auckland

  • Geographically Distributed Sensemaking: Developing Understanding in Forum-Based Software Development Teams.

    Shreeve, B; Ralph, P; Sawyer, P; Stacey, P (2015)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Global software development is becoming increasingly popular. Working in geographically distributed teams affords advantages to both employer and employee alike. Despite this, distributed working remains a point of contention for many organisations, with some claiming it unsuitable for complex collaborative work. Many argue that the complex act of team sense making (the process by which a team develops an understanding of a situation or problem) can only effectively be performed in colocated environments. To investigate this assumption, we examine the communications of a geographically distributed game development team. This global team communicates entirely via forums, yet still manages complex sense making tasks asynchronously. We use thematic analysis to investigate how themes develop during online conversations, and use speech act sequences to explore how understanding is developed during these asynchronous conversations. Our findings demonstrate how collective sense making occurs within a real-world, geographically distributed team.

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  • Culture, offending and crime control

    Webb, Robert (2015-09-16)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This seminar traces ideas and philosophies that have centred on culture in the development of state criminal justice policies for penal institutions from the 1960s onwards. Separate institutions for young Māori offenders were considered as early as the 1960s by state agencies, with arguments for and against them underpinned by assumptions around offending and cultural integration. By contrast, more contemporary conceptions around offending behaviour and identity are exhibited in the development of Māori cultural assessments and treatments within the correctional context since the 1990s. The seminar explores how particular images of the criminogenic effects of culture are generated and embedded in state crime control policies over time, and examines the critical analyses of cultural understandings and approaches.

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  • Experimental study of uplift pressures on wharf decks due to tsunami bores

    Chen, Cheng; Melville, Bruce (2015-07)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Tsunamis are extreme waves that can result from the sudden displacement of a significant volume of ocean water. Coastal buildings, bridges, highways, and harbor facilities that are at risk of tsunami inundation may suffer from significant damage if their structure has not been adequately designed for the fluid loading. This paper explores the behaviour of a combination structural model of a wharf deck mounted on a sloping shore and subjected to tsunami bores. The tsunami bores were generated in a tsunami wave flume and the deck model was built on a 30 degree sloping shore with a height of 25 cm above the bed. Detailed measurements of bore heights and bore velocities were recorded with depth transducers and high-speed video camera, and seven cases of hydrodynamic conditions were applied in the experiment. Pressure transducers were attached to the soffit of the deck to capture the spatial distribution of time-history of uplift pressures. Preliminary results demonstrate that the time-history of uplift pressures have three stages: impulsive, run-up, and quasi-steady. The impulsive pressures gradually reduced from the deck-slope connection to the front edge of the deck, and the impulsive pressures and run-up pressures appeared to be decreased by a side effect. Higher tsunami bores were generally found to generate higher uplift pressures, and a strong linear correlation was observed between the maximum uplift pressure and the bore height. An equation is presented for estimating deck mid-point maximum uplift pressures from bore heights, when the model bore heights range from 0.146~0.273m. Examples of applying the equation at prototype scales are given.

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  • Content Modelling for VIEW Datasets Using Archetypes

    Atalag, Koray; Warren, James; Jackson, RT (2012)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Use of health information for multiple purposes maximises its value. A good example is PREDICT, a clinical decision support system which has been used in New Zealand for a decade. Collected data are linked and enriched with a number of databases, including national collections, laboratory tests and pharmacy dispensing. We are proposing a new model-driven approach for data management based on openEHR Archetypes for the purpose of improving data linkage and future-proofing of data. The study looks at feasibility of building a content model for PREDICT - a methodology underpinning the Interoperability Reference Architecture. The main premise of the content model will be to provide a canonical model of health information which will be used to align incoming data from other data sources. With this approach it is possible to extend datasets without breaking semantics over long periods of time – a valuable capability for research. The content model was developed using existing archetypes from openEHR and NEHTA repositories. Except for two checklist type items, reused archetypes can faithfully represent the whole PREDICT dataset. The study also revealed we will need New Zealand specific extensions for demographic data. Use of archetype based content modelling can improve secondary use of clinical data.

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  • The Starpath Project for Tertiary Participation and Success: What have we learnt about equity and excellence in low-mid decile secondary schools?

    Kiro, Cynthia; Eaton, J; Irving, E; Webber, Melinda; Broadwith, Mark; Wilson, Aaron; Cockle, Victoria; Hynds, Anne; Bendikson, L (2015-11)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This symposium focuses on major learnings from the University of Auckland’s Starpath Project for Tertiary Participation and Success since its inception in 2005. Across five papers we highlight some of the key opportunities and challenges to addressing equity and excellence for all of our children and young people in Aotearoa. The first paper maps out the equity and excellence challenge and describes the Starpath research and development approach, with a particular emphasis on Phase 2. Each of the subsequent papers present major findings related to our most recent analysis which contribute to current knowledge about ‘what counts’ within schooling improvement initiatives that seek to address both equity and educational excellence in Aotearoa.

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  • Integrated health and social services: How they contribute to equity and good outcomes for indigenous families

    Kiro, Cynthia (2013-06)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    The biggest problem facing disadvantaged Maori and Pacifica children right now is a lack of adequate resources being committed by the government to crucial services and programs. Governments need to show leadership and foresight by investing in children now, and by having services focused on early intervention. If there is a failure to invest now, services won’t be as preventative as they should be.

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  • Using a norm-challenging approach to support gender and sexual diversity in Years 7-8 and 9-13.

    Fenaughty, John; McCardle, A (2015-11-06)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    According to the University of Auckland's Adolescent Health Research Group secondary students who are same or both-sex attracted are nearly three times more likely to report bullying than opposite-sex attracted young people. The situation for gender-diverse young people (who may identify as transgender) is worse, with such students 4.5 times more likely to report weekly bullying than their non-gender diverse peers. There is limited data about how these issues play out in primary and intermediate schools, anecdotally there is strong evidence of homophobic and transphobic bullying at these levels too. This presentation introduces the FREE Inside Out video and lesson resources that are developmentally appropriate for use with students in Years 7-8 and 9-13. The resources use a 'norm-challenging' approach to reduce homophobia and transphobia. This is achieved by using video resources of young people to recognise and explore a set of social ‘norms’ in every society. These norms are constructed over time and determine what is ‘normal’, natural and desirable. In this way, these norms also define what is ‘abnormal’, unnatural and undesirable. While not all norms are problematic, norms that construct other diverse gender and sexual identities as ‘abnormal’ and ‘undesirable’ are the basis for transphobia and homophobia. In turn, homophobia and transphobia are the basis of homophobic bullying and harassment. These resources enable educators to promote a critical lens to deconstruct these norms and the behaviours they enable. This norm-challenging pedagogical approach can then allow students, educators, and schools to identify alternative norms that affirm diversity. The presentation will demonstrate how the video and lesson resources can be used to support the NZC, particularly the wellbeing strand (around bullying and diversity) and the health strand (around sexual development, and sexuality for years 9-13). This project has been funded by the Te Punganga Haumaru Fund Community Bullying Prevention initiative that is sponsored by the Ministry of Social Development.

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  • Where is the wairua: Word stories

    Trinick, T; Dale, H (2015)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Where is the wairua – was a common challenge heard, particularly from the older generation of te reo Māori speakers to the new lexicon being created to support the teaching of school subjects that were beginning to be taught in the medium of Māori. The basis of this challenge lay partly in the belief that inanimate objects such as words have a whakapapa (genealogy) and a wairua (spirit/soul). These newly created terms did not appear to have these features. This paper tells the story of the development of selected pāngarau (mathematics) and tikanga-a-iwi (social studies) terms and the strategies used to create these new terms. Thirty years on, many of these contested lexical items have now become part of the vernacular and thus seemed to have developed a wairua. This paper examines this phenomenon and the various linguistic ideologies, which have impacted on the development of the lexicon and the resulting issues – such as the universality of curriculum terms across languages.

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  • A Question of Balance

    Abel, Susan (2010-08-08)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Today I am addressing the issue of balance in televison news, and the relative lack of Maori voices in mainstream news bulletins. I need here to explain my use of the term "mainstream". I have been uneasy about this term ever since Don Brash used it in his speech to the Orewa Rotary Club in January 2004 in a way which meant that anything or anyone outside the mainstream was suspect, and then got himself into trouble when asked to define the term more precisely. When I write I put quotation marks around the word "mainstream", so you need to imagine these everytime I use it. .....

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  • The Girl in the Kink's Shirt

    Rossiter, Hannah (2014-12-04)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    With the increased visibility of transpeople there is a pressing need to explore the operation and growth of the trans community. From the outside looking in, the trans community appears to be monolithic and homogenous, but it is in fact made up of a diverse collection of ethnicities, religions, social classes, educational backgrounds, and gender performances and identities. My research examines the social environment of butch transwomen, who are frequently viewed with suspicion as they cross the boundaries of both gender and sexuality. Their transition from identifying as straight men to identifying as either lesbians or bisexual women, and they are not adhering to traditional notions of femininity, creates a complex social environment. This dissertation explores the social-cultural aspects of the trans community, examining how social inclusion and exclusion operates among transpeople and focusing on the lived experiences of butch transwomen, who embody a wide spectrum of male to female trans identities. My research argues that non-traditional gender performannce of transwomen have been largely ignored by sociologists in favour of focusing on the process of gender transition and interaction with the cisgender world. Such a focus tends to ignore the diverse nature of existing internal social relations of the trans community.

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  • Girl in the Kink's Shirt

    Rossiter, Hannah (2014-06-26)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    As members of the trans community, butch transwomen are marginalised because they do not meet the dominant social and gender norms in regards to their presentation. Thus there is a pressing need to understand how butch transwomen, deal with social inclusion and exclusion with the trans community.

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  • Re-introducing Ethnomathematical Practices into the Classroom: Linguistic Issues

    Trinick, T; McMurchy-Pilkington, C; Taplin, B (2014)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Engineering Indoor Wireless Communication Systems with High Capacity

    Neve, Michael; Sowerby, Kevin (2015-04-14)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    The effect of wall attenuation on the uplink performance of an interference limited indoor wireless communication system is investigated. An indoor environment containing multiple co-channel access points is investigated for connections made on the basis of strongest signal or best SIR and for varying intervening wall attenuations. Power balancing is used to equalize signal-to-interference ratios (SIRs), and performance assessed by the reuse probability which quantifies the probability that two or more mobiles at randomly chosen locations can successfully share the channel. Results obtained show that even moderate wall attenuations (10-15 dB) can produce practically useful performance gains.

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  • Nativelike Māori oral language proficiency in Māori-medium education

    Edmonds, K (2015)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    In July 2014 there were 17,713 students enrolled in Māori-medium education in Aotearoa New Zealand. This number represented 2.3% of the the total school population. Māori-medium are those schools where the curriculum is taught in the Māori language for at least 51% of the time: Level 1 immersion, 80% of the time and Level 2, 51% of the time. The 282 schools with students enrolled in Māori medium include Kura Kaupapa Māori and Kura under Section 155 and Section 166 of the Education Act. A significant number of schools (189) are not designated Kura but offer Level 1 or Level 2 immersion. Oral language proficiency progressions were established and reported in Kaiaka Reo – Reo-ā-Waha ki te Motu (2013). The nationwide study used descriptive analysis and Rasch analysis to determine the reliability and validity of the Kaiaka Reo as an oral language assessment tool for Year 1 to Year 8 students in Māori medium. In this current project the researchers were charged with the annotation of Māori oral language exemplars. The oral language samples were collected from three year levels, that is, Year 1, Year 4r and Year 8 of five kura using the Kaiaka Reo oral language proficiency assessment tool. In total, 54 oral language exemplars are annotated in detail against the progressions established by Kaiaka Reo and the alignment or non-alignment of the annotations with Ngā Whanaketanga Reo Māori and Te Marautanga o Aotearoa. Special attention is given in this paper to the nativelike language of some of the students.

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  • Analysing qualitative data from virtual worlds: Using images and text mining

    McKenna, B; Myers, Michael; Whitehead, Lesley (2015-06-01)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    There is an increasing interest within both organisational and social contexts in virtual worlds and virtual reality platforms. Virtual worlds are highly graphical systems in which avatars interact with each other, and almost every event and conversation is logged and recorded. This presents new challenges for qualitative researchers in information systems. This paper addresses the challenges of analyzing the huge amounts of qualitative data that can be obtained from virtual worlds (both images and text). It addresses how images might be used in qualitative studies of virtual worlds, and proposes a new way to analyze textual data using a qualitative software tool called Leximancer. This paper illustrates these methods using a study of a social movement in a virtual world.

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  • Challenges of creating new schooling: The contrasting fortunes of pangarau (mathematics) and tikanga-a-iwi (social studies)

    Trinick, T; Dale, H (2015)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    In the past 30 years there has been considerable lexication work to support curricula development for Māorimedium schooling. Lexication of a language is a subdomain of corpus planning. Corpus, status and language-in education are considered the three major interconnected domains of language planning and policy. Traditionally, lexication was considered purely a technical exercise. It was argued that status planning dealt primarily with political matters. However, the reality for Indigenous languages such as te reo Māori, is that macro-level factors have impacted on micro-level lexication. The aim of this paper is to examine the sociolinguistic issues from language planning perspectives that have impacted on lexicon development as a result of the conflicting language goals of the various groups and agencies directly and indirectly involved in the process. For example, the development of new terminology, especially the issue of whether lexication follows the Indigenous origins (purism) versus the borrowing approach, is contentious. The impact of macro-level political imperatives on the lexicon for schooling is also examined. Our findings suggest that these imperatives, particularly economic, in the form of particular educational initiatives have acted as de facto language plans privileging certain curriculum areas over others. We examine the contrasting process of lexication for pāngarau (mathematics), a high status subject in national education with that of tikanga-a-iwi (social studies), a low status subject. We question whether pāngarau would have the same status if educational priorities were determined by the Māori-medium community. This paper highlights the tensions between the distinctive needs and priorities of Māori-medium developments and those of majority ‘national’ (English-medium) education. These include the ongoing tendency of education agencies in New Zealand to frame initiatives in terms of mainstream education which, in turn, impacts on language planning for Māori-medium schools.

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  • Te Hauora O Nga Tamariki O Whaingaroa: A Community Case Study

    Kiro, Cynthia; Barton, R; Johanson, H; Tauroa, P; Steelee, J (2003)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    The far north community of Kaeo (Whaingaroa rohe) is a pre-dominantly rural Maori community in Northland with low socio-economic status, seasonal work and high unemployment. This paper examines the methodology and findings of a joint venture research project between Te Runanga O Whaingaroa and Massey University to develop a comprehensive baseline of health indicators for tamariki and rangatahi in this community. It will examine issues such as capacity development from a community base, working with Runanga, Universities and local Health Centres, how to encompass demands for both cultural, clinical and research expertise in research of this type. The paper will also reveal some of the early findings on conceptions of hauora and how this applies to Maori youth and children, epidemiological information about this community, preliminary health survey findings and likely implications for the future in this community. This is a presentation for all those interested in how to grapple with the implications of working in a joint venture with a Maori community, including how to gather information, how to build and maintain relationships, how to understand the research process while also respecting the interests of communities who own this research. The findings also reveal unexpected results around hauora and what this means for Maori communities. The paper provides a basis for the presentation to the Conference from the researchers of the Whaingaroa Runanga, Kaeo community and Massey University.

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  • The Qualitative Secret within Quantitative Research: It’s not just about numbers

    Brown, Gavin (2015-02-27)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Investigating Senior Management Views of the Graduate Profile: Are we Assessing these Attributes?

    Grays, M; Brown, Gavin (2015)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Information theoretic criteria for least-squares trees

    Giurcaneanu, Ciprian (2015-12)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Identifying the correct evolutionary tree is an essential and difficult biological problem. It is important to neither over-resolve nor falsely resolve its structure; a problem well-suited to information criteria. Stochastic Complexity (SC) was introduced in [Rissanen(1978)] and since then various forms of it have been derived (see [Rissanen(2012)] for the newest developments of this topic). According to the MDL principle, SC is defined in the context of transmitting the existing data to a hypothesized decoder. The “encoding” is performed by using mathematical models that belong to a pre-defined class, and the model which leads to the shortest code length is deemed to be the most suitable for describing the data [Gr ünwald(2007)]. In this work, we consider SC for assessing phylogenetic trees. To this end, we use SC to encode the parameters and the model (tree) structure. We perform a theoretical comparison of SC with the well- known Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC) and investigate their behavior when the size of the tree→∞and as error → 0. Experiments are conducted with real-world and simulated data in which we compare SC with various forms of BIC, AIC (Akaike Information Criterion) and KIC (Kullback Information Criterion).

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