2,297 results for Conference item, ResearchSpace@Auckland

  • Can dynamic capabilities be developed using workplace e-learning processes?

    Costello, James; McNaughton, Rodney (2015)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Dynamic capabilities are an important, but complex concept that plays a significant role in entrepreneurship and strategy literature. In this paper, we offer a definition of dynamic capabilities and a model of how they are developed, and discuss its component constructs of entrepreneurial orientation, organisational learning, and ambidexterity. We also suggest that the microfoundations and antecedents of dynamic capabilities can be understood in the context of an organisation’s e-learning processes. Using Teece’s (2007) sensing, seizing and transforming framework we present a set of empirically testable propositions that suggest how an organisation’s e-learning processes might reflect and contribute to the development of dynamic capabilities. This article contributes to the literature by laying out a path for exploring an integrated learning process that may indicate the microfoundations of dynamic capabilities.

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  • Pre training : To help science students learn complex information

    Haslam, Carolyn (2011-11-25)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This study aims to investigate the use of pre-training as a strategy to help students in science learn complex information. This strategy has not been trialled in an actual classroom with information that is relevant to the students. The main theories underpinning this strategy are Cognitive Load Theory ( Sweller, 2005; Sweller, Paas & van Merrienboer 1998) and The Cognitive Theory of Multimedia Learning (Mayer 2001, 2005 ). The Cognitive Load Theory is primarily concerned with the impact of performing a particular task on the human cognitive processing system (cognitive load) and the design of instructional materials to facilitate understanding and learning. The Cognitive Theory of Multimedia Learning (Mayer 2001, 2005) is concerned with the use of words and pictures to promote meaningful learning by reducing the cognitive load of learning complex information. Information that is complex has many interacting elements that need to be held simultaneously in our cognitive processing system in order to understand it. These interacting elements have the potential to overload the system and hinder further processing which can affect understanding and learning. Pre-training is a strategy where complex information is presented in two stages to reduce the number of elements which need to be processed at any one time (Mayer and Moreno, 2003, Pollock, Chandler & Sweller, 2002). In stage one preliminary ideas are introduced without full understanding of all the information, this has the effect of artificially reducing the complexity (Pollock, Chandler & Sweller, 2002) and providing the learners with prior knowledge which they can use to make sense of the complex information when it is introduced as a whole in stage two (Mayer & Moreno 2003).

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  • What’s so good about being there?: Negotiating the audio visual chasm between attending the live event and reading the televised media sport experience.

    Henley, Margaret (2011-07)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    The televised sports event offers ease of reading for the dedicated sports fan and layers of accessible information for the casual viewer. It makes good commercial sense to offer a safe viewing haven for a range of viewing competencies. A high percentage of these viewers may only have watched the particular sport they follow on television and may never have played the game or attended a live event. As broadcasting of the game event becomes increasingly sophisticated, viewing pleasure and consumer satisfaction has become inextricably woven into a multi level engagement with the medium and the message. Should they attend a live sports event, they may find the relative democracy of the viewing experience overwhelming or severely lacking and turn to mediated options on offer at the live stadia. They feel cut adrift and disengaged without the support of the mediated text to help interpret their experience. This paper considers the way in which tertiary students studying media sport, interpret the ways of reading the live game and the mediated game experience on a personal and theoretical level. Examples will be taken from the two major sports on New Zealand television; men’s rugby and women’s netball. Extracts will also be analysed from a television production, ‘Full Credit’, made by the students where they have the opportunity to question media sport professionals on issues surrounding the construction of the media sport text and the production of the game event.

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  • Correlated equilibrium and Nash Equilibrium as an Observer's Assessment of the Game

    Hillas, John; Kohlberg, E; Pratt, J (2011-06)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Noncooperative games are examined from the point of view of an outside observer who believes that the players are rational and that they know at least as much as the observer. The observer is assumed to be able to observe many instances of the play of the game; these instances are identical in the sense that the observer cannot distinguish between the settings in which different plays occur. If the observer does not believe that he will be able to offer beneficial advice then he must believe that the players are playing a correlated equilibrium, though he many not initially know which correlated equilibrium. If the observer also believes that, in a certain sense, there is nothing connecting the players in a particular instance of the game then he must believe that the correlated equilibrium they are playing is, in fact, a Nash equilibrium.

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  • The effects of sorafenib and sunitinib on bone turnover markers in patients with bone metastases from renal cell carcinoma

    Sahi, C; Knox, JJ; Hinder, Victoria; Deva, S; Cole, D; Clemons, M; Broom, RJ (2009-05-20)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Bone metastases (BM) from renal cell carcinoma (RCC) are common and associated with poor outcomes. While the multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI's) sunitinib and sorafenib have advanced the treatment of metastatic RCC, their efficacy on BM is unknown. Urinary N-telopeptide (uNTX) is a marker of bone turnover measured in nmol/mmol creatinine. Elevated uNTX levels correlate with an increased risk of skeletal related events and mortality in patients receiving bisphosphonates for BM from a range of primaries. In this pilot biomarker study we sought to prospectively evaluate the effects on BM of these multi-TKI's in RCC patients. Methods: Eligible patients had advanced RCC, at least one BM evident on imaging and no bisphosphonate exposure within 4 weeks. UNTX levels (OsteoMark) were measured at; baseline and weeks-1, 4, 8 and 12 after commencing either sunitinib or sorafenib. The primary endpoint was the percentage change (Ch) in uNTX levels from baseline. Serum samples were also collected for KIT and VEGFR-2 (Quantikine). Patients also completed pain (including bone pain) and quality of life questionnaires. Results: The uNTX results on the first 9 patients are presented in the table below (7 received sunitinib and 2 sorafenib). In this group, sVEGFR-2 and sKIT levels fell by week-1 and 4 respectively and at week-12 the mean % changes (95% CI) were -34% (-0.53,-0.14) and -38% (-0.58,-0.18). Conclusions: In patients with BM from RCC and at least moderately elevated uNTX levels at baseline, these multi-TKI's show a significant trend to decrease uNTX levels, but perhaps not as effectively as bone-specific therapies (e.g. bisphosphonates) do in other malignancies. SVEGFR-2 and sKIT levels also fell across the patient group over the same period. This pilot data raises questions about the activity of the multi-TKI's in BM from RCC and further research is needed.

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  • Supporting generic sketching-based input of diagrams in a domain-specific visual language meta-tool

    Grundy, John; Hosking, John (2007)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Software engineers often use hand-drawn diagrams as preliminary design artefacts and as annotations during reviews. We describe the addition of sketching support to a domain-specific visual language meta-tool enabling a wide range of diagram-based design tools to leverage this human-centric interaction support. Our approach allows visual design tools generated from high-level specifications to incorporate a range of sketching-based functionality including both eager and lazy recognition, moving from sketch to formalized content and back, and using sketches for secondary annotation and collaborative design review. We illustrate the use of our sketching extension for an example domain-specific visual design tool and describe the architecture and implementation of the extension as a plug-in for our Eclipse-based meta-tool.

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  • Indigenous language and culture for mainstream teacher education: students' knowledge and attitudes

    Keegan, PJ; Jones, A; Brown, GTL (2010)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Sustaining Sustainable Transport in a Democracy

    Knight-Lenihan, SJ (2011)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This paper explains how moves towards integrating strategic transport planning with broad sustainable development objectives are being compromised by New Zealand Government land transport funding directives. The current Government emphasises economic development and growth to help offset the negative impacts of the global financial crisis. This undermines the intent of both transport and local government legislation to allow better incorporation of non-economic sustainability goals into funding and strategic decision-making. However, examination of national transport expenditure indicates that while the current Government does appear to be moving away from investment in transport alternatives that might increase broad non-economic sustainability values, actual investment by the previous Administration equally indicates a gap between rhetoric and reality. Further detailed research at a local level is required to identify the on-the-ground influence of policy directives on transport programmes. The paper uses a sustainable development assessment framework to demonstrate the tension between legislative intent and current political goals.

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  • Perceptual Training of Tinnitus

    Jepsen, K; Sanders, Michael; Searchfield, Grant; Kobayashi, Kei (2010)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    It is currently believed that the majority of tinnitus is a consequence of changes in the central auditory pathways following peripheral injury. This change in brain function is known as plasticity. Another form of plasticity occurs as a process of learning or training. The basis of perceptual training is that by exposure to sensory stimuli we learn, usually improving perceptual skills. Perceptual training usually requires the listener to be actively involved in listening and responding to training sounds, unlike sound therapy used in masking or habituation therapies where listeners are passively exposed to sounds. In this paper various forms of perceptual training are introduced before describing Frequency Categorisation Training (FCT) and Frequency Discrimination Training (FDT) and their effects on Tinnitus and late Auditory Evoked Potentials (AEP). Twenty participants underwent assessment and training. Assessment of tinnitus handicap rating and the P1-N1-P2 AEP complex (64 channel BioSemi EEG system) at pitch match, one octave below pitch match and at 750 Hz were undertaken before and after participants completed FCT or FDT for 21 training sessions over 3 weeks. Auditory training was carried out daily in the participants own home using a Palm Tungsten E2 PDA. The THI score reduced by 5.11 points following FDT. Ability to ignore tinnitus improved by 1.36 points following FCT on a ten point rating scale. An increase in average absolute N1 amplitude was seen following FCT, compared to decrease seen following FDT. Similar changes were not observed for the P2 waveform. The results of this study suggest that short-duration perceptual training can contribute to a reduction in tinnitus perception and that these perceptual changes can be observed as changes in auditory evoked potentials.

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  • Alveolar mechanics using realistic acinar models

    Kumar, Haribalan; Lin, C-L; Tawhai, MH; Hoffman, EA (2009)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Accurate modeling of the mechanics in terminal airspaces of the lung is desirable for study of particle transport and pathology. The flow in the acinar region is traditionally studied by employing prescribed boundary conditions to represent rhythmic breathing and volumetric expansion. Conventional models utilize simplified spherical or polygonal units to represent the alveolar duct and sac. Accurate prediction of flow and transport characteristics may require geometries reconstructed from CT-based images and serve to understand the importance of physiologically realistic representation of the acinus. In this effort, we present a stabilized finite element framework, supplemented with appropriate boundary conditions at the alveolar mouth and septal borders for simulation of the alveolar mechanics and the resulting airflow. Results of material advection based on Lagrangian tracking are presented to complete the study of transport and compare the results with simplified acinar models. The current formulation provides improved understanding and realization of a dynamic framework for parenchymal mechanics with incorporation of alveolar pressure and traction stresses.

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  • Perceived Route to Success by Pasifika Tertiary Students

    Sheryn, Sarah; Greenwood, Sina (2011)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Our work with university Pasifika mathematics students has revealed that frequently these students do not follow a clear plan that will lead to the completion of a degree. This paper examines if students have a preconceived path through university study. We investigate to whom they turn to for advice and guidance when making their university career choices, if they have a plan of study and if they understand how to negotiate the requirements for completion. The information obtained from this research will help tertiary mathematics departments devise strategies to effectively steer students towards recognising their goals and how to choose courses that will maximise their chances of attaining them.

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  • Quantifying the Motion of Murine Epicardial Coronary Arteries

    Long, David; Zhu, H; Friedman, MH (2008)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Coronary artery atherosclerosis is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in western societies. Atherosclerosis is a progressive fibroinflammatory disease identified by intimal thickening, the focal accumulation of lipids, fibrous elements, and cellular elements within the walls of large arteries.

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  • Life Requires Genetic Representation and vice versa – Consequences for ALife

    Wills, Peter (2011)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    The production of autonomously functioning, integrated, complex networks of physico-chemical processes requires the creation of some mode of informational representation in molecular form (genes), not only as a matter of fact but also as the only plausible way of designing such systems to achieve control with a level of specificity typical of molecular biological processes. Likewise, only through their natural selection as parts of systems which express the information in them could DNA sequences of kilo-, mega- or giga-base length attain specific representational meanings of biological significance. Nothing worthy of the designation “Artificial Life” will exist until an information-interpreter/constructor coupling of the sort that emerged at life’s origin on our planet is recapitulated in the laboratory. Attempts to achieve such a goal require very careful scrutiny and the ethics of such endeavours should be discussed within the context of a radical critique of how human agency is constituted and how it is linked to fundamental biological processes.

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  • Assessment of the action of a new DNA-targeting agent, SN 28049 in two novel murine cell lines

    Chen, Ying; Finlay, Graeme; Baguley, BC (2007)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Effective Use of Personal Response System in Undergraduate Physiology Teaching at University of Auckland.

    Bhargava, Anuj (2009)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    The purpose of the project is to assess the impact of use of Personal Response system on student participation and interactive learning in tutorials and other teaching group sessions. The project involved the assessment of the impact on student learning outcomes after the introduction of a “Personal Response System” where interaction by the students involved using the clickers to give responses to questions and for the tutor to quickly assess the level of understanding by the students and then adjust the level of teaching appropriately. The system enabled the Tutors/lecturer to monitor answers and hence determine the understanding of a concept before moving on to the next topic. The lecturer received feedback from the entire class which highlights the weaknesses in an individual student and understanding.

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  • Living Halls: The Second World War Memorials of the First Labour Government

    McKay, William; Jack, Fiona (2010)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    The First Labour Government of New Zealand (1935-1949) is famous for its social reforms and its government housing programme, often characterised as the introduction of a “welfare state”. This paper examines a much less well known architectural legacy of that government, the war memorial community centre. Government policy established that unlike other wars, memorials constructed to commemorate the Second World War would be utilitarian buildings, not statues, cenotaphs or arches. What’s more they would be community centres rather than sports or other facilities. The public response was enthusiastic, partially because of a pound for pound government subsidy, and over 700 applications were received for community centres, including a number of whare nui (meeting houses) and whare kai (dining halls) on marae. This paper traces government policy and explores the utilitarian war memorial in relation to both the New Zealand and international context. It also looks at the architectural form of typical war memorial community centres. However the main thrust of this paper is the exploration of public acceptance of utilitarian memorials and several reasons are explored, among them the effects of national character, government subsidy, ANZAC Day, the principles of Modernism and the nature of modern industrialised war.

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  • Colour vision in adult amblyopia

    Black, Joanna; Lun, V; Phillips, Geraint; Thompson, Benjamin (2011)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Purpose Amblyopia is a disorder of visual processing. There is evidence that the parvocellular pathway, which prefers chromatic stimuli, is selectively damaged in amblyopia. Consistent with this hypothesis, previous studies have demonstrated that patients with amblyopia show poorer performance on colour vision tests. Methods Ten adult amblyopic subjects (3 strabismic, 5 anisometropic and 3 mixed) were tested using the Farnsworth Munsell 100 Hue (FM100Hue)colour vision test. In separate testing sessions, positive spherical lenses were used to induce blur in the fellow eye (FFE)to match the near acuity of the amblyopic eye (AME). The test (all boxes)was performed under five conditions(randomised): AME,FFE,binocularly (BIN),FFE with blur and BIN with the FFE blurred. Age matched controls were included to assess the effect of defocus in normal subjects, with blur placed in front of the non-dominant eye to induce mild, moderate or severe blur. Results Amblyopic participants performed well in the FM100Hue test, with scores falling within normal age means in 9/11 subjects (in the AME). Strabismic amblyopes had a more pronounced deficit in error scores. Across all amblyopic subjects, performance was significantly beter under BIN conditions (p=0.023). Induced blur in controls only affected error scores under the severe blur condition, and had litle effect in amblyopic participants. Conclusion This study has shown that amblyopes perform well in this commonly performed colour vision test, and demonstrated improved test performance under binocular conditions. The low spatial frequency of the stimuli may allow for extensive pooling of chromatic information therefore allowing performance of this test to be robust to a parvocellular dysfunction.

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  • Halfcaste or Bicultural: John Scott, Maori and Architecture in the 1960s’

    McKay, William (2006-09)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Palisade: Okahu Bay

    McKay, WD (2009)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Praticising perfection: The physical costs of practice in tertiary music and dance students

    Martin, Rosemary; Kenny, Diana; Cormack, Justine (2009)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Despite the many physical demands involved in practice in music and dance, little attention has been paid to the impact of practice on the musculoskeletal system of young performers. We, therefore, assessed whether the amount of daily practice and the practice and rehearsal routines of tertiary music and dance students were related to the frequency and severity of reported performance related musculoskeletal disorders (PRMD) in 109 music and 42 dance (36% males) from The National Institute of Creative Arts and Industries, University of Auckland. Music students practiced, on average, 156 minutes per day, compared with 107.5 minutes for dance students. Music students spent an average of 401 minutes and dance students spent an average of 369 minutes per week rehearsing with others. Contrary to prediction, linear regression analyses showed no relationship between PRMD frequency, severity or duration, and any of the practice factors assessed. Although excessive practice is frequently cited by performing artists as one of the contributors to PRMD, this study did not confirm a relationship between practice and PRMD in this sample. It is possible that the amount of practice (2.6 hours per day in music students and 1.8 hours for dancers) fell below the threshold for a pain inducing practice period, particularly as these students reported taking rest breaks after 48 (dancers) and 60 (music) minutes’ practice. Further research is needed to assess the relationship between PRMD and practice.

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