4 results for Conference item, Shared Repository

  • Using library stocktaking data to make evidence-based decisions about library procedures and policies

    Parker, Ailsa (2010-01-08)

    Conference item
    Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    A stocktake prior to a move to a new building ensures that holdings on the library catalogue are accurate and items on the shelves arranged correctly. Whitireia Community Polytechnic at Porirua, New Zealand, followed this procedure. Regular stocktakes had been done, but some investigation into best practice was required as the stocktake was to be electronic rather than manual. A loss rate was identified as well as problem areas, and evidence gained from the stocktake was then appraised and evaluated in terms of other data from within the library system e.g. the previous stocktake, item loan records and intra-campus loan data. Results were benchmarked against other academic libraries, although New Zealand data was difficult to obtain. A set of recommendations and best practice guidelines was then drawn up. Probably one of the most useful sources of benchmarking data and guidelines was Theft and loss from UK libraries: a national survey. This 1992 paper from the Crime Prevention Unit Series by John Burrows and Diane Cooper, details definition, frequency, extent and nature of loss from British libraries.

    The library is now in its new building and the results of any future stocktake will need to be examined in terms of changes to the physical layout of the library e.g. non-library staff can exit the building without going through security gates, the staff information desk is now a considerable distance from the security gates and users have access to an external deck. A separate Maori collection has also been created. In addition, recent well-publicised thefts from New Zealand libraries has generated some literature on the subject of stocktaking and theft, so this can also be incorporated into future benchmarking and planning.

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  • Experiential learning in the multicultural classroom as applied to a Market Research class

    Klose, Markus (2009-12-23)

    Conference item
    Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    Society's expectation of tertiary education providers, and especially polytechnics, is that they will "produce" skilled, workforce-ready graduates. Tertiary teachers are expected not only to provide students with relevant knowledge of an academic discipline, but also to develop employability skills in students .This paper discusses the author's experience in using an experiential learning strategy for a second-year degree paper in the field of Market Research to a multicultural group of student from Asian backgrounds. The author's aim is to provide students with a learning environment, where they can acquire discipline knowledge and skills which are relevant for their future employment. This paper does not provide a systematic evaluation of the effectiveness of this approach, but aims at sharing ideas and experience with participants of the Learning and Teaching Conference in an interactive round-table discussion.

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  • Research that works: a practical approach to student collaborative work

    Clark, Jill (2009-12-23)

    Conference item
    Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    The authors of this paper, who tutor at two different technical institutes, have collaborated for the past four years on a research project examining New Zealand experiences with student collaborative learning in multicultural groups. International research, while acknowledging the challenges involved, is positive about the educational benefits of working in diverse groups. There has been little New Zealand research, however, in this area. The first stage of this project identified issues that tertiary tutors faced when using collaborative learning in their classrooms. Subsequent findings of this research project have been consistent with the literature on the benefits and challenges of inter-cultural collaborative learning. The results indicate that students are often inadequately prepared for working in groups and therefore do not achieve the desired outcome of learning to work together constructively and collaboratively. The development of the 'soft skills' required by industry is often not achieved by either domestic or international students. This paper outlines the particular challenges faced by New Zealand tertiary tutors who wish to use collaborative learning techniques for assessment purposes. The findings from this and other research projects have been used to construct a model that will help tutors set up collaborative programmes that not only meet the basic requirements of effective collaborative learning but are also pedagogically sound and culturally accommodating. Such programmes will benefit tutors as well as domestic and international students.

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  • Cooperative learning: a double edged sword

    Baker, Trish (2009-12-23)

    Conference item
    Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    Although there has been very little research done in co-operative learning in New Zealand, international research is positive about the educational benefits of working in culturally diverse groups. This paper presents the findings of a research project examining New Zealand experiences with co-operative learning in multicultural groups. The paper presents findings from surveys and focus groups with both domestic and international students and with New Zealand tertiary lecturers who use collaborative learning techniques in their programmes. The findings from this research indicate that there is a strong cultural conflict in the conceptualisation of cooperative learning between international students with little prior experience of cooperative learning and New Zealand lecturers who are often not fully prepared to help international students to bridge the gaps. The majority of international students value lecturers' programme content delivery and the achievement of high marks over the development of interpersonal skills; this is contrary to New Zealand lecturers' belief that the development of team skills is the most important outcome from cooperative learning. This cognitive dissonance reinforces the importance of understanding cultural differences and their impact on student patterns of classroom behaviour. This paper recommends that domestic and international students be prepared more effectively for cooperative learning and that lecturers be trained in designing curricula and assessment programmes that are pedagogically sound and culturally accommodating. The paper proposes a model to assist lecturers to achieve this aim.

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