348 results for Conference item, Unitec Research Bank

  • French media cultural policy and media integration: From national to European?

    Papoutsaki, Evangelia (1999)

    Conference item
    Unitec

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  • The spatial syntax of Iraqi refugee housing in Syria

    Potangaroa, Regan; Chan, Tao (2010)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Space Syntax developed from the work of Benedikt in 1979 and then Hillier and Hanson in 1984. Benedikt created visual maps within building plans by drawing the contours of equal visual areas calling the resulting map an ‘isovist field.’ He theorized that these isovists fields would correspond to the pattern of people’s movements and provide insight into how a space was navigated. This theory was confirmed by Hillier who together with Hanson went on to develop the approach by using a grid of nodes. Lines drawn from each node established the connectedness of that point to the remainder of the grid points within the space being studied. And it was from this that the visual graph analysis approach and spatial syntax emerged. The spatial tool has the ability to draw out spatial patterns from 2D floor plans that would not otherwise be easily quantified and it is this quality that is the subject of this paper. The paper applies the approach to the last 5 remaining households at El Hol camp in Syria of refugees from the 1990-91 Gulf conflict. The basic house data was collected in February 2003. The results support the idea of an “intimacy gradient” being inherent in the building design which may not have been otherwise identified. And that this gradient appears to be important, it is certainly vernacular, extremely subtle and perhaps fundamental at least to the design of this housing. It will be interesting to compare and discuss whether that was the case for housing in Gujarat and other areas. This paper seeks to extend earlier qualitative work on “Talking to the Building” presented at i-Rec 2008 and the use of Quality of Life surveys to measure whether people were “happy” presented at both i-Rec 2006 and 2008 as a way to understand and also verify the needs of the building’s occupants.

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  • Convenient fictions? A critical communicative perspective on financial accumulation, autopoiesis and crisis in the wake of the credit crunch

    Thompson, Peter (2010)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Recent turmoil in the financial markets following the sub-prime mortgage crisis and the credit crunch has repercussions in many other spheres of society. Governments have spent trillions of taxpayer dollars propping up the banking system in order to avoid systemic financial collapse. Significant public policy questions are being raised about the sustainability of the monetarist macroeconomic paradigm and the dogmatic neoliberal faith in financial deregulation. Media discourses have included open criticism of the finance sector. However, the right of private banks to create money through the issuance of credit and the generation of fictitious values through the securitisation of anticipated future revenue remain peripheral to policy debate, even though they lie at the heart of the recent crises. Although Marx provided the seminal critique of capitalism’s internal contradictions, his work on credit-money and financial accumulation processes were never fully developed. However, the more recent work of Hyman Minsky emphasises the role of credit systems in financial markets’ endogenous tendency toward crisis. This paper proposes to extend a Marxist critique of contemporary financial crises using Minksy’s financial instability hypothesis. However, this requires emphasis on the reflexive communicative processes underpinning credit-money and fictitious financial values. In doing so, it will highlight the role of media and communication systems in accumulation regimes and the risks posed to the lifeworld as financial processes become increasingly self-referential and autopoietic.

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  • Resources and capacity: Lessons learned from post-disaster reconstruction resourcing in Indonesia, China and Australia

    Chang, Yan; Wilkinson, Suzanne; Potangaroa, Regan; Seville, Erica (2010)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Post-disaster reconstruction poses resourcing challenges specific to the construction practitioners and requires constant improvements of the construction industry and of the environment in which it operates. By drawing on in-field surveys and observations in the disaster affected areas in Indonesia, China and Australia, the research examines their respective resourcing practice following a disaster with a particular focus on identifying the resource and capacity constraints that confronted the reconstruction practitioners in a post-disaster situation. This mapping exercise helps draw attention from decision makers and the construction sector to the vulnerable areas in post-disaster reconstruction and also generates lessons and experiences worthy of adoption in other disaster situations. Practical measures are suggested to improve the implementation of physical reconstruction through laws, regulations and policies, along with the according mechanisms in the industry and at a project level.

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  • The otla: A ‘free space’ in Balkrishna Doshi’s Aranya settlement

    Kaza, Krystina (2010)

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    Unitec

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  • Communicating community re-organisation in India: Selective developmental interventions in perspective

    Papoutsaki, Evangelia; Naqvi, Munawwar (2011-01-01)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    This paper presents a critical perspective on communication with communities within the development efforts at the grassroots level in the Indian context. It is part of an exploratory research undertaken by one of the authors (Naqvi, M) on Non-Governmental Development Organisations’ (NGDOs) communication with their target communities in central India. The authors present two models, selective interaction and new involvement, developed from the data collected from semi-structured interviews of different types of NGDOs in Central India. They discuss conflicting ideals at play in the objectives and approaches of the ‘key players’ interacting with the community, and how these objectives are communicated to the community. The ‘key players’ include the externally funded NGDOs, the State funded NGDOs, the Elected Panchayat (governing body), the Traditional Panchayat (body of elders), and, the Target (beneficiary) Community itself. Since development interventions of NGDOs within participatory approaches establish gram sabhas or similar village level organisations comprised of individuals or groups from within the community to gain cooperation into their projects, a certain re-organisation is an inevitable part of ground NGDO’s interaction with the target community. The new structures that emerge get modified and strengthened as the project moves on, so the social, economic, and political landscape changes significantly over the duration of intervention(s). The first model Selective Interaction maps major stated objectives which affect the key players’ interaction with the community. Conflicting approaches are identified such as political agenda driven activities of the elected Panchayat; Free market, corporate culture driven activities of the externally funded NGDOs; state funded NGDO’s activities driven by compliance/control/monitoring of Government Schemes; and culture driven activities of the traditional Panchayat. Some questions are asked within the context of this model including (1) whether the agents of change (key players) recognise the consequences of developmental interventions with highly selective objectives, which may or may not be mutually compatible (2) and if they are aware, it raises further questions in the area of preparedness for the challenges emerging from this non-integrated approach evident from data. Such questions bring into focus the way communication is managed around sharing this awareness (where it exists with the agents) with the target community, how much is shared and to what end. Finally, where no such communication exists, what might be the reasons for not sharing of this awareness with the community? The key players at the grassroots level are mapped with the range of other larger players who have a visible stake in development of the community. This second model was introduced in part as the new involvement model (Naqvi, 2004) as a modification of the ‘community agency’ model (proposed by Lyons et al 2001) and adjusted to the Indian context. This model attempts to look at the larger picture and identifies (1) the ongoing or eventual isolation of certain players (2) the structural constraints on key players acting through linguistic and non-linguistic means (3) Media interest at various levels of development stakeholders, and (4) information flows Considering some of the anecdotal accounts of research interviewees, the discussion finally reflects on whether developmental interventions within the participatory development paradigm genuinely seek the integration of the local community(ies) into the global economy, or that community development is a transitory objective –the longer term objective being seamless integration of local resources into the global economy.

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  • Evidence on the impact of International Financial Reporting Standards in New Zealand

    Rainsbury, Liz; San Diego, Josefino S.; Walker, Lyndon (2010)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Purpose – This paper examines the financial impact from the adoption of international financial reporting standards (IFRS) on New Zealand (NZ) companies. It analyses the effects of IFRS on the accounting numbers reported in financial statements. It also compares the association of NZ IFRS versus NZ GAAP book value of equity and earnings with market values with particular emphasis on smaller listed companies. Design/methodology/approach – The paper examines a sample of New Zealand listed companies that adopted NZ IFRS between 2005 and 2007. Financial statement data under NZ IFRS and the previous generally accepted accounting practice were hand collected from annual reports. The data is analysed using descriptive statistics and linear regression. Findings – The adoption of IFRS resulted in statistically significant increases in earnings, assets and liabilities. The IFRS adjustments were largely as anticipated, but IFRS adoption did not improve the value relevance of the accounting numbers. The value relevance of IFRS accounting numbers was marginally lower than that of NZ GAAP. For small listed companies, and early adopters, IFRS equity adjustments reduced value relevance. Originality/value – The study examines the impact of a major regulatory change in financial reporting by documenting New Zealand’s experience with the changeover. The findings are of relevance to the accounting profession and regulators as they debate whether IFRS should be required for the preparation of external financial statements for small to medium-sized enterprises. enterprises.

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  • Transforming the communities of tomorrow

    Sharma, Rashika (2010-01-01)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    The exponential globalisation of the economy warrants the formulation of a pathway that harnesses the human and social capital that can work together collaboratively and proactively to promote the development of sustainable communities. Education for Sustainability presents that pathway to ensure transformation of the current human and social capital thus fostering change in society and helping build communities that can be more sustainable in all aspects. However the power of education in achieving sustainable development has been seriously undermined indicated by the relatively slow implementation of sustainability concepts in most educational curricula. This paper elaborates the importance of education for sustainability and expounds on an Applied Technology degree offered at Unitec, New Zealand. Based on a qualitative study the research corroborates that student’s perspectives and opinions on sustainability undergo significant transformation when concepts of sustainability are embedded and integrated in the curriculum. The findings demonstrate that educating the current student generation is essential for manoeuvring the community towards sustainable development.

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  • Te Whāriki: Rhetoric and reality

    Blaiklock, Ken (2012-01)

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    Unitec

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  • Growth and diversification of mass media in India: Whose interests, whose ideas?

    Naqvi, Munawwar (2011-12)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    This paper compares two distinct perspectives on the growth of mass media in India. On the one hand we have the institutional and business perspective commonly employed in the assessment of the growth and diversification of print, electronic, and online media. This perspective asserts itself in the media discourse measuring the growth in revenues of mass media, media diversity, consumption of media products, popularity and penetration of various types of content and the like. On the other hand there is the development communication perspective, which is dominated by the political economic critique questioning the benefits the development and diversification of mass media has delivered to the masses. An ongoing research on ‘NGDO perception of their relationship with their stakeholders’ conducted by the author of this paper, addresses this aspect. Preliminary findings with respect to NGDO interaction with mass media suggest that the appearance of ‘development news’ in mainstream media can largely be traced as the history of repeated press releases and other efforts made by the NGDOs. Respondent NGDOs also acknowledge that it is essential for them to get press coverage because it enhances NGO profile which in turn helps securing funding opportunities for their programmes and development interventions in the community. Although, the hard found positioning in the news may be advantageous for NGDOs’ institutional development, it does lend itself to criticism whether it actually translates into a tangible and sustainable gain for the beneficiary communities serviced by these NGDOs—for instance, in terms of developing and fostering wider-community networks, addressing of local issues, access to markets for local products etc. In a comprehensive model the authors map the higher levels of media interest at policy levels and corporate PR to its lowest ebb at the grassroots development activity. The drivers of mass media growth are deeply rooted in the modernity paradigm, which is quite paradoxical with the elements of participatory development and communication. Often it is assumed that growth of Internet Technologies and Interactive Online Media demonstrates potential to pull the traditional mass media out of the modernity paradigm by encouraging and accommodating participation of the masses. However, in India, access to these new media is by far limited to urban middle-class, whereas the emergence of a truly deliberative and participatory democracy would solicit an active participation of the vast majority of the rural population, in both consumption and creation of content.

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  • Diasporic islands: Communicating Pacific cultural identities in diaspora

    Papoutsaki, Evangelia; Strickland, Naomi (2009-06)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    This paper examines diasporic identities within the Pacific islands context and how these identities are communicated through different forms of diasporic media. Islands tend to be diasporic in nature and islanders shape their identities often in movement. Movements within island groups and the greater Pacific ocean, both by islanders themselves and outsiders, have enabled these islands to create complex identities that have expanded beyond their natural boundaries and into well established diasporic communities that have stimulated multifaceted and multi-trafficking communication practices within the diasporic communities themselves; between diasporic communities across the world; and between these communities and their island homes. These communication processes illustrate how these island identities are formed and/or sustained in diaspora and what impact these processes have on these identities. South Pacific island diasporas are found in NZ, Australia and the US. They have formed lively communities with distinctively diverse identities and established channels of communication, formal and informal, traditional and virtual, from the ‘coconut wireless’ to church newsletters and radio stations. This paper examines how these diasporic island communities communicate their identities through these media and how the latter contribute to the sustenance and (re) construction of cultural identities away from home. This paper is mostly based on data collected during the pilot phase of a Pacific Diaspora media project conducted in Auckland, New Zealand in 2008. The project sought to identity the available diasporic media and map its primary functions. The authors are now looking at the emerging theme of media and diasporic island cultural identities. There are increasing references to Pacific Islands communities living abroad as Pacific diasporas (i.e. Howard, 1999; Morton, 1998; Gershon, 2007; Spoonley, 2001). Spickard et al (2002) in Pacific Diaspora: Island Peoples in the United States and Across the Pacific , explore the ‘transnational or diasporic model’in examining the Pacific communities living abroad, which emphasises continuing links with their people at home or elsewhere abroad. They also explore the ‘pan-ethnicity model’ which is more pronounced among second and third generation Pacific Island migrants who are increasingly seeing themselves as Pasifika people with a new hybrid inclusive identity. The current debate is whether we now have new ethnic identities which focus on shared Polynesian descent, pan-polynesian or ‘nessian’ identities e.g. ‘New Zealand borns’, ‘P.I.’s’, ‘Polys’, or pasifikans. Also, the gradual replacement of the term Pacific Islanders with the terms Pacific people in both official and popular discourse is an acknowledgment of the fact that most Pacific descent people are no longer from the traditional island homelands, and that their commonalities derive from culture rather than place of birth. Pacific diasporic media in New Zealand has been shaped and diversified along these lines, catering as the paper demonstrates for a diverse diasporic audience.

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  • Development of GIS learning objects for an enhanced conceptual understanding and skills development of complex computing tasks

    Aguilar, Glenn (2011-10)

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    Unitec

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  • GIS research for biodiversity management and animal welfare

    Farnworth, Mark; Aguilar, Glenn; Fraser, Diane; Galbraith, Mel (2011-10)

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  • New Guinea: A divided island. Papua New Guinea’s relationship with West Papua

    Matbob, Patrick; Papoutsaki, Evangelia (2012-06)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    This paper gives an historical and current account of New Guinea, a Pacific Island divided between the independent state of Papua New Guinea and the Indonesian territory of West Papua and explores the ambiguous relationship between the two “brothers,” with a particular focus on media reporting. West Papua’s struggle for independence from Indonesia has gone largely unnoticed by the international media. It is sporadically covered by the neighbouring and regional media and this only in times of crisis such as refugees crossing borders, hostage taking and protests against the Freeport Mining Company that operates the world’s biggest gold deposit. There are currently 10,400 West Papuan refugees in PNG and although the country has shown solidarity to their “cultural brothers” in the past, current geopolitical tensions see Indonesia’s influence on PNG affecting that that solidarity. The paper is divided into two parts. The first part provides the island’s colonial history context and the role of the main colonial powers that led to the island’s division, along with the postcolonial and cold war legacies that sealed the fate of the island as a divided one. It also deals with the current geopolitical situation that involves the interests of Indonesia, PNG and Australia. In the second part the authors focus on the relationship between West Papua and PNG and how this is reflected particularly in the media. The decline in coverage of West Papua in the PNG press is worth exploring as it maps the decline of PNG’s engagement in the fate of their “cultural brothers” and neighbours (Matbob & Papoutsaki, 2006). They discuss a number of issues that have resulted from the islands division, including the issues of traditional cross-borders and the West Papua refugee camps/settlements in PNG. They also provide new evidence of increased cross border activities including trade and people flows that indicate the two parts of the island are communicating id different ways. The authors have interviewed a number of West Papua activists and Papua New Guinean journalists, conducted media content analysis of PNG newspapers and collected ethnographic data from the northern borders of PNG and West Papua.

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  • It takes two: Sharing language skills and cultural insights with EAL students preparing for work placements

    Malthus, Caroline; Lu, Hongyan (2008)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    This paper reports on collaboration between a Learning Development lecturer and a Nursing lecturer working with English as an additional language (EAL) nursing students. We set up voluntary sessions, with the aim of helping the students to develop communication skills for clinical practice. These sessions were jointly facilitated with input based on our different perspectives - sociolinguistic information via authentic nursing dialogues from Caroline and hands-on nursing topics from Hongyan. Our on-going needs analysis and evaluation process established that despite the brevity of the sessions, students felt they had developed greater awareness of the demands of clinical practice, greater facility in using the language of nursing and, most importantly, confidence to express themselves effectively. This experience of collaboration informed us about each other's disciplines and gave us opportunities to closely observe student interactions. We are currently working on a related research project.

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  • Strategies for retention and success of special group students utilising a technological approach

    Storey, Carol; Nicholson, Elizabeth; Lawler, Elaine (2003)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Groups of students with specific needs have been identified within a learning situation. This paper will address strategies that utilise technology (amongst other methods) to enhance the students' effectiveness as learners, thereby leading to an increase in student retention and academic success. Additionally, it will suggest teaching techniques to augment the effectiveness of teachers of special groups. The groups considered are mature women students, students from a non-English speaking background (NESB) and late arriving international students. These groups exhibit particular problems and needs over and above mainstream students, and coping strategies have been developed, utilising technology wherever possible. Issues raised by these groups are identified and described, as are their characteristics and behaviours, for example: • Mature women students often have heavy additional family commitments. They often struggle with technology, as it may be completely new to many of them. In fact, some of them display all the characteristics of a technophobe. • NESB students, whilst often New Zealand citizens or residents have the disadvantage of a language barrier and a different learning culture • International students often arrive after the course is underway and, consequently, have two barriers to overcome - that of language and that of trying to catch up. The special needs of these groups of students, if not met, can impair their learning experience and lead to their dropping out, or failing assessments. In conclusion, we will show that a range of coping strategies can assist in overcoming these barriers, and this paper outlines the suggested strategies for each of the above groups.

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  • Reflective practice - The laser striking new chords in communication

    Monteiro, Sylila (2003-12)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    The concept of reflective practice introduced by Donald Schon (1983,1987) and initially taken aboard by teacher educators, is applicable in most tertiary learning situations. Reflective practice is the cultivation of the capability to reflect in action - while doing something - and to reflect on action - after it has been done. It creates an alternative to the 'first learn theory, and then put it into practice' that forms the basis of traditional education. In this alternative the "deep" approach as opposed to the "surface" approach is emphasized. Through reflection in action, students exercise their imagination and relate new ideas to their "repertoire of past experiences ... to make sense of the current situation," (Cervero,1988) and undertake spur-of-the-moment experiments to make decisions on appropriate courses of action. Kolb's Learning Cycle advocates reflection on action, which is the need to reflect on the overall situation, as there are always other ways of meeting learning outcomes. Thus the student is able to engage in a process of continuous learning through this recurrent introspection. This paper presents strategies for reflective practice in the learning of communication through the integration of both experience with reflection and theory with practice.

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  • Serving the world communities - tutoring & mentoring as an agent of change in a multi-cultural society

    Hobbs, Moira (2000)

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    Unitec

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  • UNITEC's Language Learning Centre meets the world!!

    Hobbs, Moira (2002-11)

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    Unitec

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  • Exploring the relationship between KPI's and the information they give the reader in the form of reports

    Beechey, John (2003-02)

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    Unitec

    There is a school of thought that advances the proposition that "traditional" financial accounting KPI's are insufficient to track how a business is moving towards its strategic objectives. Traditional accounting does not link physical measures and profit. Nor does it identify the relationships between the business drivers, nor does it differentiate between leading and lagged KPI's. New techniques, such as the balanced scorecard, active learning and benchmarking, are more powerful and forward looking. We cannot subscribe totally to the view that "traditional" accounting is dead, if only because legislation and stewardship require accounts to be produced. The newer techniques should supplement "management" accounts, not replace them. Before we can develop management accounts (accounting) further, current standards of "traditional" accounting presentation need to be addressed in order to get the basics right as a sound foundation

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