2 results for Conference item, "Have-nets and have-nots" - what determines internet access in New Zealand

  • "Have-nets and have-nots" - what determines internet access in New Zealand

    Smythe, M. (2000)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Internet access and social issues: Various commentators overseas have speculated that access to the Internet is a dynamic force for social good, improving communication, education, employment, medical care, and political participation. This has come about due largely to the opportunities the Internet and other technologies seemingly represent to empower individuals. In addition there is an increasing amount of information becoming available only on the Internet. Consequently, issues of access to Information Technology and the Internet are becoming of increasing concern to policy-makers both in NZ and overseas, where terms such as “digital divide” and “information haves and have-nots” are appearing regularly in various media. At a recent Unesco conference is was stated that “Unesco could use its mandate of promoting access to information ...to define a universal right of access to the Internet with which member states would have to comply”(Pullar-Strecker, 1998).

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  • "Have-nets and have-nots" - what determines internet access in New Zealand

    Smythe, M. (2000)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Internet access and social issues: Various commentators overseas have speculated that access to the Internet is a dynamic force for social good, improving communication, education, employment, medical care, and political participation. This has come about due largely to the opportunities the Internet and other technologies seemingly represent to empower individuals. In addition there is an increasing amount of information becoming available only on the Internet. Consequently, issues of access to Information Technology and the Internet are becoming of increasing concern to policy-makers both in NZ and overseas, where terms such as “digital divide” and “information haves and have-nots” are appearing regularly in various media. At a recent Unesco conference is was stated that “Unesco could use its mandate of promoting access to information ...to define a universal right of access to the Internet with which member states would have to comply”(Pullar-Strecker, 1998).

    View record details