85 results for Conference item, Share

  • GREEN Grid Choice Modelling preliminary report

    Williams, John Richard (2014)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

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  • Trends and age profile of 0–24 year olds hospitalised with gastroenteritis

    Oben, Glenda; Simpson, Jean (2015-11)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    Background Hospitalisations for gastroenteritis have been increasing internationally. New Zealand rates were 6.0 per 1,000 0–14 year olds in 2006–2010. Yet hospitalisation for gastroenteritis is potentially avoidable. For example, rotavirus is one of the main causes of gastroenteritis hospitalisation of under 5 year olds. In New Zealand, rotavirus accounted for 1 in 52 children being hospitalised before they were three years. The introduction of the rotavirus vaccine in the US reduced the hospitalisation rate of children. Aim To determine overall and age-specific rates of gastroenteritis hospitalisation of 0–24 year olds in New Zealand and identify the ages at greater risk. Methods A retrospective analysis of acute and semi-acute in-patient hospitalisations of 0–24 years with a primary diagnosis of gastroenteritis extracted, for the period 2000–2014, from the National Minimum Dataset. Results During 2000–2014, the gastroenteritis hospitalisation rate increased from 3.6 per 1,000 0–24 year olds (n=5,028) in 2000 to 5.3 per 1,000 (n=8,151) in 2014. The highest rates were for 0–4 year olds, and in particular those under two years of age. Non-specific gastroenteritis (45.7%), viral enteritis (32.9%), and nausea and vomiting (presumed non-infectious; 15.5%) were the predominant forms of gastroenteritis diagnosed as the reason for hospitalisation. Those aged under one year had the highest hospitalisation rates for the various forms of gastroenteritis, with the exception of rotavirus where the highest rates were for one year olds. Conclusion In New Zealand, hospitalisation rates of gastroenteritis have been increasing since 2000, particularly for 0–4 year olds. The high rates for those under two years is consistent with other research. The highest hospitalisation rates were associated with non-specific diagnoses, particularly notable within viral diagnoses, where‘other viral enteritis’ increased while the rotavirus and norovirus rates appeared stable.

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  • Illuminating Otago Heritage

    Brown, Allison; Delaborde, Emmanuel (2016)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    Poster introduction: Goal: Optimise the University Library's DAMS (Digital Asset Management System) workflows relating to ingest and curation of our digital collections. Issue: The standard ingest process for Islandora requires a separate ingest form per format. Solution: A single ingest process for different formats - re-use metadata from other databases e.g. MINISIS and Alma (see main Workflow) - provide a straightforward bulk ingest process (see Coingest) - establish ongoing syncing of metadata from other databases (see Cosync). Submitted paper abstract: The University of Otago Library is responsible for the curation of extensive New Zealand and other heritage collections, in particular, those housed within the Hocken Collections. The need to better curate and showcase these collections to the widest possible audience has informed the development of a digital preservation solution for all Library digital assets, including, but extending beyond these valued heritage items. This presentation will outline the Library strategy for building staff capacity and knowledge around (a) the preservation and curation of our digital assets, (b) the establishment of Curation Framework policies, and (c) the development of a Digital Asset Management System (DAMS). With attention shifting from access (the usual focus of repository requirements) to curation, the University of Otago Library has invested in developing a DAMS to curate digital objects using Fedora Commons / Islandora software, rather than other software currently in use (for example DSpace and Omeka). Themes: Repositories and Cultural Heritage, Integrating with the Wider Web and External Systems, Managing Rights, Developing and Training Staff Audience: Repository Managers, Developers, Librarians, Archivists and anyone interested in digital curation.

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  • Reliability of the TekScan MatScan® system for the measurement of postural stability in older people with rheumatoid arthritis

    Brenton-Rule, A; Mattock, J; Carroll, M; Dalbeth, N; Bassett, S; Menz, HB; Rome, K

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Postural stability can be measured in clinical and research settings using portable plantar pressure systems. People with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have decreased postural stability compared to non-RA populations and impaired postural stability is associated with falls in people with RA. The purpose of this study was therefore to investigate the reliability of the TekScan MatScan® system in assessing postural stability in people with RA.

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  • A multi-strategy approach for location mining in tweets: AUT NLP Group entry for ALTA-2014 shared task

    Nand, P; Perera, R; Sreekumar, A; Lingmin, H

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    This paper describes the strategy and the results of a location mining system used for the ALTA-2014 shared task competition. The task required the participants to identify the location mentions in 1003 Twitter test messages given a separate annotated training set of 2000 messages. We present an architecture that uses a basic named entity recognizer in conjunction with various rule-based modules and knowledge infusion to achieve an average F score of 0.747 which won the second place in the competition. We used the pre-trained Stanford NER which gives us an F score of 0.532 and used an ensemble of other techniques to reach the 0.747 value. The other major source of location resolver was the DBpedia location list which was used to identify a large percentage of locations with an individual F-score of 0.935.

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  • Equal partners? Improving the integration between DSpace and Symplectic Elements

    Murdoch, C; Miller, K; Schweer, A

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    While self-submission by academics was regarded as the ideal way to add content to Open Repositories in the early days of such systems, the reality today is that many institutional repositories obtain their content automatically from integration with research management systems. The institutional DSpace repositories at Auckland University of Technology (AUT) and at the University of Waikato (UoW) were integrated with Symplectic Elements in 2010 (AUT) and in 2014 (UoW). Initial experiences at AUT suggested a mismatch between the interaction options offered to users of Symplectic Elements on one hand and the actions available to repository managers via the DSpace review workflow functionality on the other hand. Our presentation explores these mismatches and their negative effects on the repository as well as on the user experience. We then present the changes we made to the DSpace review workflow to improve the integration. We hope that our experiences will contribute to an improvement in the integration between repository software and research management systems.

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  • Living well with disability: needs, values and competing factors

    Mudge, S; Kayes, NM; Stavric, VA; Channon, AS; Kersten, P; McPherson, KM

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Background Obesity is more prevalent for disabled people (estimated as being between 27-62%) compared to the general population (17-22%). Disabled people are more likely to report poorer general health and acquire a range of obesity-related secondary conditions. Although there are many physical activity and nutrition initiatives aimed at obesity prevention, little is known about whether these options are relevant and accessible for disabled people. The Living Well Study aimed to better understand the issues faced by disabled people when engaging in physical activity and healthy eating. Methods The study drew on a participatory action research design involving key stakeholders. There were two core cyclical phases (A and B), in which data collection was followed by a period of analysis, reflection and refinement. Focus groups and interviews were held with individuals who experience a range of disabilities, family members, service providers and representatives from disability advocacy groups. We sought to explore the importance and meaning of physical activity and healthy eating and factors that influenced engagement in these. Data in phase A were analysed using conventional content analysis drawing on constant comparative methods to identify themes of importance. In phase B, data analysis occurred alongside data collection, using a structured template to summarise participants’ agreement or disagreement with the draft themes and recommendations, until the themes and recommendations were refined based on participants’ corroboration. Results 146 participants aged between 10–69 years, from both rural and urban areas and of different cultural backgrounds participated. Seven interconnecting themes that related to engagement in living well behaviours emerged with a wide range of external factors (such as people, knowledge, time, cost, identity and the environment) impacting on living well options. The central theme - It depends: needs, values and competing factors - emphasised the complexity faced by a disabled person when balancing the external factors with their own personal values and needs in order to arrive at a decision to engage in healthy living behaviours. Conclusions Although disabled people experience similar issues when participating in healthy living behaviours as those living without disability, additional factors need to be addressed in order to improve opportunities for ‘living well’ in these populations. This information has implications for health professionals to target the relevance and content of interventions.

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  • 60 years of creativity in business organizations

    Sosa Medina, R; Connor, AM; Rive, P

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    This paper analyses the role of creativity in business organizations by examining the core ideas of an article published sixty years ago as a way to elucidate how relevant they are today in view of the research literature. The paper proposes the use of computational social simulations to support systematic reasoning about some of these longstanding issues around organizational creativity. An example of an agent-based simulation to study team ideation is presented to support systematic reasoning about the role of creativity in business organizations and to articulate future lines of inquiry.

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  • Disaster e-Health: a new paradigm for collaborative healthcare in disasters

    Parry, D; Norris, A; Madanian, S; Martinez,, S; Labaka, L; Gonzalez, JJ

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Disaster management and disaster medicine are well-established disciplines for responding to disasters and providing care for individuals whose health and wellbeing has been affected. However, these disciplines have different origins, development, and priorities so that communication and coordination across them during disasters is often lacking, leading to delayed, sub-standard, inappropriate or even unavailable care. Moreover, neither discipline exploits the new range of ehealth technologies such as the electronic health record or telehealth and mobile health that are revolutionizing non-disaster healthcare. We need a new paradigm that applies information and e-health technologies to improve disaster health planning and response. This paper describes the initial stages of a project to develop such a paradigm by scoping and developing the area of disaster e-health.

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  • A multi-strategy approach for location mining in Tweets: AUT NLP Group entry for ALTA-2014 shared task

    Nand, P; Perera, R; Lingmin, H

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    This paper describes the strategy and the results of a location mining system used for the ALTA-2014 shared task competition. The task required the participants to identify the location mentions in 1003 Twitter test messages given a separate annotated training set of 2000 messages. We present an architecture that uses a basic named entity recognizer in conjunction with various rule-based modules and knowledge infusion to achieve an average F score of 0.747 which won the second place in the competition. We used the pre-trained Stanford NER which gives us an F score of 0.532 and used an ensemble of other techniques to reach the 0.747 value. The other major source of location resolver was the DBpedia location list which was used to identify a large percentage of locations with an individual F-score of 0.935

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  • Meeting the Challenges of Teaching Spatial Technology for Archaeology at the University of Otago

    McCoy, Mark (2013)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    Peer Reviewed

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  • Implementing Automated Photogrammetry for the New Zealand eScience Infrastructure (NeSI) Facilities

    Mills, Steven; Eyers, David; Huang, Zhiyi; Leung, Kai-Cheung; Tang, Xiaoxin (2013)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    Peer Reviewed

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  • Influence of covariates on treatment outcome in placebo-controlled trials of benzodiazepines in GAD

    Gale, Christopher; Glue, Paul; Wilkinson, Sam; McMurdo, Maave; Rapsey, Charlene; Coverdale, John; Guaiana, Giuseppe (2013)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    There was a variation in the subject and title from abstract submission to poster with the poster concentrating far more explicitly on modelling the causation of heterogeneity within the database of RCTs.

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  • Linking geospatial databases using stratigraphic names: principles and practice

    Strong, Delia; Haubrock, Soren; Rattenbury, Mark; Mortimer, Nick (2013)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    Peer Reviewed

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  • Personalized Energy Priorities: A User-Centric Application for Energy Advice

    Ford, Rebecca; Sumavsk, Ondrej; Clarke, Auren; Thorsnes, Paul (2014)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    This research presents a new web-based application, called Personalised Energy Priorities (PEP), that provides households with personalised and tailored advice on practices or technologies they might adopt to improve the energy efficiency of their home. PEP proceeds in a manner similar to an online energy audit, but combines a user centric design approach with relatively new choice modelling software that allows recommendations to be tailored to individual preferences. The tool also provides links to further information about each energy recommendation, creating a more successful, one-stop-shop for persuasion.

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  • Using different atmospheric correction methods to classify remotely sensed data to detect liquefaction of the February 2011 earthquake in Christchurch

    Broszeit, Amelia; Ashraf, Salman (2013)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    Peer Reviewed

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  • Bayesean Analysis as a Predictor of outcome rate.

    Gale, Christopher; Glue, Paul; Gallagher, Sarah; Gray, Andrew (2013)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    Attaching the electronic copy of the abstract book.

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  • The effect of recent adverse events and psychotic symptomatology among people with schizophrenia

    Gale, Christopher; Mullen, Richard; Patterson, Tess; Gray, Andrew (2013)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    There have been considerable investigations in recent years of the correlation of early life event interactions, with psychotic symptomatology, with suggestions of causal links.. However, most of these investigations do not consider more recent life events at the same time. Outpatients with schizophrenia were surveyed using the CIS-R and PANNS. Questions from the life events module were weighted by the frequency of events and correlated with PANSS positive, negative and total scores and suicidality questions An association was found between lifetime sexual abuse, and positive symptoms a victim of a crime and home violence with positive symptoms, and between being in difficulties with the police and suicidality. Lifetime bullying was associated with a decrease in negative symptoms. Further investigations of life events need to consider both early and recent events.

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  • Libraries and wellbeing in post-earthquake Christchurch

    Gallagher, Sarah K.J.; Adams, Andrew; Howard, Anna; Robertson, Donna; Reynolds, Ryan; Winn, Coralie (2013-11)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    References are available in a separate document.

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  • Dialogue and two-way symmetrical communication in Public Relations theory and practice

    Theunissen, P; Rahman, K (2011-11-29)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Dialogue is often equated to two-way symmetrical communication, and over the years the concept has been subsumed into the systems theory. Textbook authors make cursory references to “dialogue” and “conversation” while focusing mainly on achieving “symmetry” in the organisation-public relationship, suggesting that symmetry is the ideal state of public relations and that dialogue contributes to achieving this state. As a result they inadvertently perpetuate the myth that dialogue is not only the preferred mode of public relations practice but that it also leads to “agreement”. Ironically, none—if any—provide practical guidelines as to how dialogue can be achieved. Scholars of dialogue often point out that dialogue requires not only a willingness to participate but also the suspension of control and focus on predetermined outcomes. In real terms this appears an unrealistic goal to strive towards in the practice of public relations. As part of an ongoing study into dialogue in public relations theory and practice, this paper explores concepts and expectations in the dialogic process, lamenting the lack of clear definitions and principles communicated in popular Public Relations textbooks. It also reports on an exploratory survey among public relations practitioners in the Asia-Pacific region to identify prevailing views of the use of dialogue and two-way communication and guide further qualitative investigation.

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