35 results for Conference item, Use commercially

  • Illuminating Otago Heritage

    Brown, Allison; Delaborde, Emmanuel (2016)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    Poster introduction: Goal: Optimise the University Library's DAMS (Digital Asset Management System) workflows relating to ingest and curation of our digital collections. Issue: The standard ingest process for Islandora requires a separate ingest form per format. Solution: A single ingest process for different formats - re-use metadata from other databases e.g. MINISIS and Alma (see main Workflow) - provide a straightforward bulk ingest process (see Coingest) - establish ongoing syncing of metadata from other databases (see Cosync). Submitted paper abstract: The University of Otago Library is responsible for the curation of extensive New Zealand and other heritage collections, in particular, those housed within the Hocken Collections. The need to better curate and showcase these collections to the widest possible audience has informed the development of a digital preservation solution for all Library digital assets, including, but extending beyond these valued heritage items. This presentation will outline the Library strategy for building staff capacity and knowledge around (a) the preservation and curation of our digital assets, (b) the establishment of Curation Framework policies, and (c) the development of a Digital Asset Management System (DAMS). With attention shifting from access (the usual focus of repository requirements) to curation, the University of Otago Library has invested in developing a DAMS to curate digital objects using Fedora Commons / Islandora software, rather than other software currently in use (for example DSpace and Omeka). Themes: Repositories and Cultural Heritage, Integrating with the Wider Web and External Systems, Managing Rights, Developing and Training Staff Audience: Repository Managers, Developers, Librarians, Archivists and anyone interested in digital curation.

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  • Reliability of the TekScan MatScan® system for the measurement of postural stability in older people with rheumatoid arthritis

    Brenton-Rule, A; Mattock, J; Carroll, M; Dalbeth, N; Bassett, S; Menz, HB; Rome, K

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Postural stability can be measured in clinical and research settings using portable plantar pressure systems. People with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have decreased postural stability compared to non-RA populations and impaired postural stability is associated with falls in people with RA. The purpose of this study was therefore to investigate the reliability of the TekScan MatScan® system in assessing postural stability in people with RA.

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  • Equal partners? Improving the integration between DSpace and Symplectic Elements

    Murdoch, C; Miller, K; Schweer, A

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    While self-submission by academics was regarded as the ideal way to add content to Open Repositories in the early days of such systems, the reality today is that many institutional repositories obtain their content automatically from integration with research management systems. The institutional DSpace repositories at Auckland University of Technology (AUT) and at the University of Waikato (UoW) were integrated with Symplectic Elements in 2010 (AUT) and in 2014 (UoW). Initial experiences at AUT suggested a mismatch between the interaction options offered to users of Symplectic Elements on one hand and the actions available to repository managers via the DSpace review workflow functionality on the other hand. Our presentation explores these mismatches and their negative effects on the repository as well as on the user experience. We then present the changes we made to the DSpace review workflow to improve the integration. We hope that our experiences will contribute to an improvement in the integration between repository software and research management systems.

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  • Living well with disability: needs, values and competing factors

    Mudge, S; Kayes, NM; Stavric, VA; Channon, AS; Kersten, P; McPherson, KM

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Background Obesity is more prevalent for disabled people (estimated as being between 27-62%) compared to the general population (17-22%). Disabled people are more likely to report poorer general health and acquire a range of obesity-related secondary conditions. Although there are many physical activity and nutrition initiatives aimed at obesity prevention, little is known about whether these options are relevant and accessible for disabled people. The Living Well Study aimed to better understand the issues faced by disabled people when engaging in physical activity and healthy eating. Methods The study drew on a participatory action research design involving key stakeholders. There were two core cyclical phases (A and B), in which data collection was followed by a period of analysis, reflection and refinement. Focus groups and interviews were held with individuals who experience a range of disabilities, family members, service providers and representatives from disability advocacy groups. We sought to explore the importance and meaning of physical activity and healthy eating and factors that influenced engagement in these. Data in phase A were analysed using conventional content analysis drawing on constant comparative methods to identify themes of importance. In phase B, data analysis occurred alongside data collection, using a structured template to summarise participants’ agreement or disagreement with the draft themes and recommendations, until the themes and recommendations were refined based on participants’ corroboration. Results 146 participants aged between 10–69 years, from both rural and urban areas and of different cultural backgrounds participated. Seven interconnecting themes that related to engagement in living well behaviours emerged with a wide range of external factors (such as people, knowledge, time, cost, identity and the environment) impacting on living well options. The central theme - It depends: needs, values and competing factors - emphasised the complexity faced by a disabled person when balancing the external factors with their own personal values and needs in order to arrive at a decision to engage in healthy living behaviours. Conclusions Although disabled people experience similar issues when participating in healthy living behaviours as those living without disability, additional factors need to be addressed in order to improve opportunities for ‘living well’ in these populations. This information has implications for health professionals to target the relevance and content of interventions.

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  • Influence of covariates on treatment outcome in placebo-controlled trials of benzodiazepines in GAD

    Gale, Christopher; Glue, Paul; Wilkinson, Sam; McMurdo, Maave; Rapsey, Charlene; Coverdale, John; Guaiana, Giuseppe (2013)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    There was a variation in the subject and title from abstract submission to poster with the poster concentrating far more explicitly on modelling the causation of heterogeneity within the database of RCTs.

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  • Bayesean Analysis as a Predictor of outcome rate.

    Gale, Christopher; Glue, Paul; Gallagher, Sarah; Gray, Andrew (2013)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    Attaching the electronic copy of the abstract book.

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  • The effect of recent adverse events and psychotic symptomatology among people with schizophrenia

    Gale, Christopher; Mullen, Richard; Patterson, Tess; Gray, Andrew (2013)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    There have been considerable investigations in recent years of the correlation of early life event interactions, with psychotic symptomatology, with suggestions of causal links.. However, most of these investigations do not consider more recent life events at the same time. Outpatients with schizophrenia were surveyed using the CIS-R and PANNS. Questions from the life events module were weighted by the frequency of events and correlated with PANSS positive, negative and total scores and suicidality questions An association was found between lifetime sexual abuse, and positive symptoms a victim of a crime and home violence with positive symptoms, and between being in difficulties with the police and suicidality. Lifetime bullying was associated with a decrease in negative symptoms. Further investigations of life events need to consider both early and recent events.

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  • Dialogue and two-way symmetrical communication in Public Relations theory and practice

    Theunissen, P; Rahman, K (2011-11-29)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Dialogue is often equated to two-way symmetrical communication, and over the years the concept has been subsumed into the systems theory. Textbook authors make cursory references to “dialogue” and “conversation” while focusing mainly on achieving “symmetry” in the organisation-public relationship, suggesting that symmetry is the ideal state of public relations and that dialogue contributes to achieving this state. As a result they inadvertently perpetuate the myth that dialogue is not only the preferred mode of public relations practice but that it also leads to “agreement”. Ironically, none—if any—provide practical guidelines as to how dialogue can be achieved. Scholars of dialogue often point out that dialogue requires not only a willingness to participate but also the suspension of control and focus on predetermined outcomes. In real terms this appears an unrealistic goal to strive towards in the practice of public relations. As part of an ongoing study into dialogue in public relations theory and practice, this paper explores concepts and expectations in the dialogic process, lamenting the lack of clear definitions and principles communicated in popular Public Relations textbooks. It also reports on an exploratory survey among public relations practitioners in the Asia-Pacific region to identify prevailing views of the use of dialogue and two-way communication and guide further qualitative investigation.

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  • An immense clip: film, philosophy and the proximate violence of becoming

    O'Connor, MT (2012-04-08)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Three conditions of becoming-image weave their way through this analysis in a consideration of violence as an ethical imperative with respect to the experimental sensate cinema of French filmmaker Philippe Grandrieux, in particular, his second feature La Vie Nouvelle (2002). The weave of movement, rest and proximity tighten, in suggesting violence as an ethical moment in our becoming-image. This paradoxical critique of an ethics of violence eventually finds an arresting moment in proximity of the image-experience through its ontological montage structure as that continuous passage of our existence as proximate beings. With a critique of telecommunication and networked information technologies as those delivery systems for pain at a distance, we locate in Grandrieux something arresting that testifies to the impossibility of being elsewhere. All image encounters today, given their excessive presence, testify without alibi, without elsewhere as reference point, to the perpetuation of us as being in a middle (milieu) of an “immense clip” without end or establishment. Becoming imperceptible in the becoming-image of our material sensate being incepts three moments of imperceptibility: Deleuze and Guattari’s shadow-plane as chaos that envelopes us all for future possible people and earth; Grandrieux’s mutant-style productive of perpetual darkness; and Maurice Blanchot’s riveting thought on the artwork as that testimony to a without exit of our being in what he describes as le mourir or the “other night.” Together they weave something akin to a poetics of darkness on the thought of image and image of thought.

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  • Being open: timely access to NZCYES publications

    Gallagher, Sarah; Duncanson, Mavis; Simpson, Jean (2016-11)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    Please add to the NZCYES collection

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  • Lagrangian measurements of turbulent dissipation over a shallow tidal flat from pulse coherent Acoustic Doppler Profilers

    Mullarney, Julia C.; Henderson, Stephen M. (2012)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    We present high resolution (25 mm spatial, 8 Hz temporal) profiles of velocity measured over a shallow tidal flat using pulse-coherent Acoustic Doppler Profilers mounted on surface drifters. The use of Lagrangian measurements mitigated the problem of resolving velocity ambiguities, a problem which often limits the application of high-resolution pulse-coherent profilers. Turbulent dissipation rates were estimated from second-order structure functions of measured velocity. Drifters were advected towards, and subsequently trapped on, a convergent surface front which marked the edge of a freshwater plume. Measured dissipation rates increased as a drifter deployed within the plume approached the front. A drifter then propagated with and along the front as the fresh plume spread across the tidal flats. Near-surface turbulent dissipation measured at the front roughly matched a theoretical mean-shear-cubed relationship, whereas dissipation measured in the stratified plume behind the front was suppressed. After removal of estimates affected by surface waves, near-bed dissipation matched the velocity cubed relationship, although scatter was substantial. Dissipation rates appeared to be enhanced when the drifter propagated across small subtidal channels.

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  • Relationship between science and technology in the New Zealand curriculum

    Jones, Alister (1997)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    New Zealand underwent major curriculum reforms in the early1990s. These reforms were determined by the New Zealand Curriculum Framework (Ministry of Education 1993), which provides an overarching framework for the development of curricula in New Zealand and which defines seven broad essential learning areas. The seven essential learning areas that describe in broad terms the knowledge and understanding that all students need to acquire, are health and well-being, the arts, social sciences, technology, science, mathematics,and language and languages. For example, the essential learning area of science includes the subjects of science, biology, chemistry, physics, earth sciences, agriculture, horticulture, and geography, as well as aspects of home economics and environmental studies.

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  • Designing an e-portfolio environment for assessment of a collaborative technology project

    Edwards, Richard (2015)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    E-portfolios can be used to record both the development process and the outcomes of technology design projects. Preparation of an appropriate e-portfolio environment, including the choice and set-up of the software, provision of both formal and informal support, and alignment with the assessment task, all require deliberate attention to design principles. This paper draws from the literature to identify important design considerations for an e-portfolio environment being used in an investigation of the feasibility of using e- portfolios for assessing individual performance in a collaborative technology project. It explores similar e- portfolio development projects and theoretical positions to develop a set of specifications and key considerations as a framework for the current project and as a contribution to ongoing discussions in this area.

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  • Measuring the bulk impedance of brain tissue in vitro

    Wilson, Marcus T.; Lin, Oliver D.; Voss, L.J.; Jones, K. (2015)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Theoretical and numerical models of brain activity suggest a link between seizures and electrical connectivity. We have therefore been motivated to measure electrical conductivity in brain tissue. Such measurements in vitro are difficult; it is necessary to use a conductive inorganic salt solution, artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF), to keep the tissue alive. We have attempted to provide a robust method to make such measurements. Mouse brain tissue was sliced (400 μm) using established methods. Half the slices were placed in standard ACSF; half were placed in ACSF devoid of magnesium ions. The latter case promotes seizure activity. Electrical activity was measured with a tungsten electrode at various places on the slices. Sixty-nine samples of cortex (2 mm × 2 mm) were cut with a razor. Their areas were measured with a calibrated microscope. Each sample was placed between two flat Ag/AgCl electrodes in a Perspex sandwich. Excess ACSF was removed with filter paper. The impedance was measured at 25°C from 20 Hz to 2 MHz with an Agilent E4980A four-point impedance meter in a shielded room, using a low current. Between 1 kHz and 100 kHz the conductivity was approximately 0.2 S m⁻¹; outside this range dispersion occurred. Samples prepared in the magnesium-free ACSF had a conductivity about 10% lower. The Cole-Cole model of conductivity was fitted. There were few significant differences between the parameters for the different groups measured.

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  • Social music in cars

    Cunningham, Sally Jo; Nichols, David M.; Bainbridge, David; Ali, Hasan (2014)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    This paper builds an understanding of how music is currently experienced by a social group travelling together in a car - how songs are chosen for playing, how music both reflects and influences the group’s mood and social interaction, who supplies the music, the hardware/software that supports song selection and presentation. This fine-grained context emerges from a qualitative analysis of a rich set of ethnographic data (participant observations and interviews) focusing primarily on the experience of in-car music on moderate length and long trips. We suggest features and functionality for music software to enhance the social experience when travelling in cars, and prototype and test a user interface based on design suggestions drawn from the data.

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  • Ten years of MIREX: reflections, challenges and opportunities

    Downie, J. Stephen; Hu, Xiao; Lee, Jin Ha; Choi, Kahyun; Cunningham, Sally Jo; Hao, Yun (2014)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    The Music Information Retrieval Evaluation eXchange (MIREX) has been run annually since 2005, with the October 2014 plenary marking its tenth iteration. By 2013, MIREX has evaluated approximately 2000 individual music information retrieval (MIR) algorithms for a wide range of tasks over 37 different test collections. MIREX has involved researchers from over 29 different contrives with a median of 109 individual participants per year. This pater summarizes the history of MIREX form its earliest planning meeting in 2001 to the present. It reflects upon the administrative, financial, and technological challenges MIREX has faced and describes how those challenges have been surmounted. We propose new funding models, a distributed evaluation framework, and more holistic user experience evaluation tasks-some evolutionary, some revolutionary-for the continued success of MIREX. We hope that this paper will inspire MIR community members to contribute their ideas so MIREX can have many more successful years to come.

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  • Across the ditch: the collective diabetic foot assessment

    Rome, K; Ihaka, B (2011-08-24)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

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  • Indigenous approaches at play in creating positive student outcomes in a tertiary institution

    McFall-McCaffery, Judith; Cook, Stephanie (2016-08-13)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This paper demonstrates how the weaving of indigenous Pacific research, pedagogical approaches and methodologies can be effectively employed by Pacific peoples in a blended learning tertiary environment to both promote and modify academic and information literacy skills (AIL). AIL skills are part of the key attributes of the University of Auckland Graduate Profile which the University believes students require to succeed in academia. The use of Pacific indigenous methodologies like Teu le va/Tauhi va (Samoan/Tongan relationships), Tālanoa (Pacific discussion formal and informal) and the Kakala framework (Tongan pedagogy) in working with students and staff build on existing knowledge, experience and values of many students. The approach adopted has also contributed to a change in academic staff and student perceptions of AIL as ‘library’ only skills in a Pacific Studies undergraduate programme at the University. The application of an expanded “culturally and linguistically sustaining” (Paris, 2012) integrated approach in our study is producing research based positive outcomes such as: increased academic staff support for AIL integration; increase in student participation and engagement in Libraries and Learning Services workshops and First Year Students Targeted Learning Sessions. The close collaboration va/relationships and tālanoa with staff and students help address areas for further collective development, such as scaffolding and expanding research skills into the next level courses and better transparency of research skills in course assessment. This paper will be of interest to institutions with growing Pacific and other minority populations, seeking to assist students achieve positive academic outcomes.

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  • A practitioner’s guide to learning analytics

    Gunn, Catherine; McDonald, J; Donald, C; Milne, J; Nichols, M; Heinrich, E (2015)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    A growing body of literature identifies learning analytics as an emergent field of research that can deepen our understanding of learning and inform learning design practice. However, realizing the potential is not straightforward, as even defining learning analytics is vexed. For teachers and learning designers, the practical issue of how to engage with learning analytics data is problematic. This discussion paper begins by outlining the background to learning analytics at a practice level. Next, we introduce learning analytics frameworks, and one in particular that serves our aim to develop a guide for practitioners wishing to engage with learning analytics for different purposes. We will develop and refine the guide by mapping it to case-studies at NZ tertiary institutions, and through discussion with practitioners internationally. Our goal is to make analytics data more accessible and useful to teachers, learning designers and institutions

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  • Reusing repository technology for Cultural Heritage and Special Collections

    Knowles, CG; Shepherd, Kim; Latt, Yin Yin; Watts, Jared; Dhoble, K; Taylor, R; Renton, S; Lewis, S; Sutherland, I (2014)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    The University of Auckland and the University of Edinburgh will provide insights regarding the re-use of repository technology for cultural heritage and special collections. With examples of collections and observations on development and deployment of the Skylight application. The University of Auckland Library maintains a variety of digital collections, including metadata indices, bibliographies and cultural heritage collections. These collections are managed and curated in a single DSpace repository. The requirement for each collection to have its own distinct look, feel and functionality, loosely coupled to the backend repository, resulted in the development of a new application called Skylight. The University of Edinburgh’s Library and University Collections holds a diverse range of special collections from Anatomy to Zithers. The desire to adopt one solution to make disparate collections available on a managed platform with their own online identities, led to the adoption of Skylight. Reusing existing repository technology in these institutions means that staff can continue to use their current repositories, yet apply them to new and expanding numbers of collections. Utilising Solr as both a discovery layer and a metadata source means the dependencies between the UIs and backend repositories are minimised, allowing either technology to be replaced by another.

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