323 results for Conference item, 2008

  • ...So why procurement?

    Msimangira, K. A. B. (2008)

    Conference item
    Open Polytechnic

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  • The challenge of whakawhanaungatanga for the early childhood sector.

    Brennan, M. (2008)

    Conference item
    Open Polytechnic

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  • The challenge of whakawhanaungatanga for the home based sector

    Brennan, M. (2008)

    Conference item
    Open Polytechnic

    Discusses the challenge of whakawhanaungatanga for the home based sector.

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  • Facilitating learning by using case studies

    MacGregor, A.; Nesbit, T. (2008)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    A number of issues can result in institutions seeking alternatives to industry based capstone projects in the final semester or year of three year qualifications in information and communications technology (ICT), whether they be three year degree programmes or diploma programmes such as the level 7 Diploma in Information and Communications Technology (DipICT – Level 7), formerly called the National Diploma in Business Computing (NDBC). One issue documented has been large numbers of international students as documented by a number of writers including Chard and Wempe (2004), Baker and Nesbit (2006). The issue giving rise to this paper is where a small institution has built links with industry based clients through the offering of DipICT Level 7 projects, but due to a decline in student numbers has ceased the offering of the DipICT Level 7 programme. There was however a desire to maintain the relationships that had been built with the industry based clients. The aim of this paper is to investigate the pitfalls and promise of using client case studies in a simulated work environment to fulfil learning outcome requirements in DipICT Level 6 courses so that these relationships can be maintained with industry based clients. The framework used is small classes, full work days, multiple courses being taught at the same time and multiple clients. The framework used is described. A trial implementation is reported on, and feedback analysed from client, student, tutor and administrative views. Given this feedback, modifications to the process are suggested. The paper then discusses whether there is promise for investigating using these methods in a larger situation.

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  • Techlabs virtually four years on

    Correia, E.; Watson, R. (2008)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Techlabs is a network the authors implemented some years ago in order to provide a rich learning environment through the use of virtualisation. They outlined the background to and reasons for employing virtualisation in a paper to the conference of the National Advisory Committee on Computing Qualifications (NACCQ) in 2004. In this paper they now describe some of the changes they have introduced during the past four years, in the context of recent developments and the widespread adoption, both in industry and the academic sector, of virtualisation of one form or another.

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  • Rationalising Student Numbers in Degree and Diploma Courses: The CPIT Experience

    McCarthy, C.; Nesbit, T. (2008)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT) delivers both its three year BICT degree and the two year level 6 DipICT programme in parallel with sufficient student numbers to justify the two separate programmes. Both qualifications even go so far as to have three areas of specialisation or streams – network administration, programming and multimedia. However, from time to time, there have been subject areas in one or both of the two programmes specialisation areas that have been low enough to make it difficult to justify to CPIT administrators running some of these courses. The fact that these subject areas were required by industry became increasingly difficult to satisfy the administrators’ requirements to meet budgetary constraints. The Programme Leaders of the two programmes of study examined ways and means to provide students with a range of course and specialisation choices that also satisfied industry’s need for graduates and the administrators’ budgetary compliance requirements. This paper looks at the various proposals created by the two Programme Leaders over the past two years.

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  • To what extent are Maori studying ICT? The policy implementation gap?

    McCarthy, C. (2008)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Maori are studying ICT at a disproportionate rate. Maori make up 15% of the New Zealand population yet Maori school leavers are trailing the success tables and despite the advent of the Wananga, Maori tertiary students (aged 18 to 24) are declining (Social Report, 2007). Recent government reports are also identifying Maori as having a low level of involvement in ICT (NZ Government Executive, 2000). With the approval of CPIT’s Kaiarahi, this paper examines the current literature on this issue. It also examines the responsibilities under the Treaty of Waitangi, gives a brief overview and analysis of the government policies and strategies involved, and looks at how these responsibilities, policies and strategies are working in practice. Finally this paper suggests the need for in-depth collaborative applied research – both at a local and a national level.

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  • DDSWG: direct digital synthesis waveform generator

    Bright. M. J.; Li, Y. (2008)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper discusses the development of a direct digital synthesis waveform generator as a forty week project, contributing to over thirty percent of a BEngTech student’s final year grades. The waveform generator uses a numerically controlled oscillator to digitally synthesize standard and arbitrary waveforms up to a frequency of 5MHz, with adjustable output voltage ranging from 5mV(p-p) to 10V(p-p) and DC offset between 5VDC. The 32-bit phase accumulator and the 8-bit phase to amplitude converter were implemented within programmable logic Xilinx’s Spartan-IIE FPGA. With the success of implementing the digital section of the DDS waveform generator and the design flexibility of VHDL and FPGAs, four DDS waveform generators have been synthesized within the FPGA, each with independent wave shape, frequency, and phase control.

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  • Literature review on online assessment authentication

    McCarthy, C. (2008)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    While it is acknowledged that much more has been written on this subject than can be reviewed here, every effort has been made to search for and review those works that were deemed by the author and others to have the closest relationship to the issues of online assessment and authentication of such online assessment when developing online courses and programmes of study at CPIT.

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  • The revision of a database course - The process and the result

    Nesbit, T.; Kennedy, D. (2008)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Practical database skills such as a working knowledge of SQL, data analysis and database design are recognised as important and useful skills. However a traditional database course that is assessed using a theory-based exam, a research assignment, and two practical assignments still allows many students to pass who subsequently show that they have minimal practical skills. This paper describes the redesign of a database course in the Bachelor of Information and Communication Technologies (BICT) at Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT) that emphasises practical skills and assessments that require students to demonstrate that they have gained these skills. The processes used were a literature review that covered what other writers have identified as being important skills, a review of student comments regarding the application of the content of the course to their capstone projects and a review of the database needs of other second and third year courses in the degree. The result of this process saw the introduction of a revised course where there was little change to the content that was covered, but a change in emphasis to ensure that students who pass the course had at least mastered the basic skills of SQL and had greater exposure to the design and implementation of relational databases.

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  • Attracting students to computing: The collaborative development of an innovative marketing tool

    Young, A. (2008)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Over the past few years students enrolling in computing courses or choosing computing as a major have been declining. (McCallum, 2006, Chabrow, 2004) Review of the literature tells us that one of the reasons for this decline is the “image of computing” as a viable career option. To help eliminate this myth a project was established under the Accelerating Auckland Task Force TEC funding to create a DVD for high school students to show how exciting a career in computing can be. Six Auckland tertiary institutions collaborated to design and produce a DVD outlining eight different careers in the field of computing. This paper outlines the background to the declining enrolments, the collaboration of the six tertiary providers and the production and development of the DVD. Free copies of the DVD will be available at the presentation.

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  • Developing and introducing courses on testing and quality assurance

    Joyce, D.; Young, A. (2008)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper reviews the processes involved in developing level 6 and 7 courses on testing and quality assurance. These processes include having the initial idea, conducting market research, deciding to proceed, forming a development team, gathering data, deciding levels and prerequisites, identifying resources, obtaining approvals, and marketing to students. The paper also reflects on the learnings gained from the experience of delivering the level 6 course for the first time.

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  • ACEing the delivery of technical content online

    Lyons, M.; Nesbit, T. (2008)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    There are many issues involved when it comes to the online delivery of technical content, particularly content that involves information and communications technology (ICT). McCarthy and Ross (2005) described and analysed an eLearning initiative where the students enrolled in a programme of study were brought together for block courses from geographically dispersed locations. One of the reasons for doing this was to enable some of the higher end technical content to be delivered in a more efficient manner as some of this content required student to have access to multiple operating environments that might not have been possible in their home situation. The use of virtual machine technology for delivering such aspects has been described, analysed and explored by Watson and Correia (2004) and others and has provided a sound solution for situations like this. Martin and Nesbit (2007) have explore the notion of context when it comes to eLearning and the importance of recognising the different aspects of context with these including the differing comprehension levels, preferred learning styles and cognitive abilities of the students enrolled. This notion of context can also be extended to the operating environment of the students. This particularly applies where the operating systems and versions of applications that these online students have at their disposal may be different from each other and from the resources. The purpose of this paper is to describe and analyse how VMware ACE (Assured Computing Environment) was used to create DVD-based virtual machines for the delivery of both an operating systems and a multimedia applications course from the Diploma in Information and Communications Technology (DipICT), and in particular how this is able to deal with issues surrounding different versions of operating systems and applications, as well as some software licensing issues. The conclusions of the paper highlight the advantages of using products such as VMware ACE and some of the potential pitfalls that exist. The findings should be of interest to institutions who are contemplating the delivery of similar types of online courses where it is important that students have access to the same versions of operating systems and applications.

    View record details
  • Literature review on online assessment authentication

    McCarthy, C. (2008)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    While it is acknowledged that much more has been written on this subject than can be reviewed here, every effort has been made to search for and review those works that were deemed by the author and others to have the closest relationship to the issues of online assessment and authentication of such online assessment when developing online courses and programmes of study at CPIT.

    View record details
  • Techlabs virtually four years on

    Correia, E.; Watson, R. (2008)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Techlabs is a network the authors implemented some years ago in order to provide a rich learning environment through the use of virtualisation. They outlined the background to and reasons for employing virtualisation in a paper to the conference of the National Advisory Committee on Computing Qualifications (NACCQ) in 2004. In this paper they now describe some of the changes they have introduced during the past four years, in the context of recent developments and the widespread adoption, both in industry and the academic sector, of virtualisation of one form or another.

    View record details
  • The revision of a database course - The process and the result

    Nesbit, T.; Kennedy, D. (2008)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Practical database skills such as a working knowledge of SQL, data analysis and database design are recognised as important and useful skills. However a traditional database course that is assessed using a theory-based exam, a research assignment, and two practical assignments still allows many students to pass who subsequently show that they have minimal practical skills. This paper describes the redesign of a database course in the Bachelor of Information and Communication Technologies (BICT) at Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT) that emphasises practical skills and assessments that require students to demonstrate that they have gained these skills. The processes used were a literature review that covered what other writers have identified as being important skills, a review of student comments regarding the application of the content of the course to their capstone projects and a review of the database needs of other second and third year courses in the degree. The result of this process saw the introduction of a revised course where there was little change to the content that was covered, but a change in emphasis to ensure that students who pass the course had at least mastered the basic skills of SQL and had greater exposure to the design and implementation of relational databases.

    View record details
  • Rationalising Student Numbers in Degree and Diploma Courses: The CPIT Experience

    McCarthy, C.; Nesbit, T. (2008)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT) delivers both its three year BICT degree and the two year level 6 DipICT programme in parallel with sufficient student numbers to justify the two separate programmes. Both qualifications even go so far as to have three areas of specialisation or streams – network administration, programming and multimedia. However, from time to time, there have been subject areas in one or both of the two programmes specialisation areas that have been low enough to make it difficult to justify to CPIT administrators running some of these courses. The fact that these subject areas were required by industry became increasingly difficult to satisfy the administrators’ requirements to meet budgetary constraints. The Programme Leaders of the two programmes of study examined ways and means to provide students with a range of course and specialisation choices that also satisfied industry’s need for graduates and the administrators’ budgetary compliance requirements. This paper looks at the various proposals created by the two Programme Leaders over the past two years.

    View record details
  • ACEing the delivery of technical content online

    Lyons, M.; Nesbit, T. (2008)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    There are many issues involved when it comes to the online delivery of technical content, particularly content that involves information and communications technology (ICT). McCarthy and Ross (2005) described and analysed an eLearning initiative where the students enrolled in a programme of study were brought together for block courses from geographically dispersed locations. One of the reasons for doing this was to enable some of the higher end technical content to be delivered in a more efficient manner as some of this content required student to have access to multiple operating environments that might not have been possible in their home situation. The use of virtual machine technology for delivering such aspects has been described, analysed and explored by Watson and Correia (2004) and others and has provided a sound solution for situations like this. Martin and Nesbit (2007) have explore the notion of context when it comes to eLearning and the importance of recognising the different aspects of context with these including the differing comprehension levels, preferred learning styles and cognitive abilities of the students enrolled. This notion of context can also be extended to the operating environment of the students. This particularly applies where the operating systems and versions of applications that these online students have at their disposal may be different from each other and from the resources. The purpose of this paper is to describe and analyse how VMware ACE (Assured Computing Environment) was used to create DVD-based virtual machines for the delivery of both an operating systems and a multimedia applications course from the Diploma in Information and Communications Technology (DipICT), and in particular how this is able to deal with issues surrounding different versions of operating systems and applications, as well as some software licensing issues. The conclusions of the paper highlight the advantages of using products such as VMware ACE and some of the potential pitfalls that exist. The findings should be of interest to institutions who are contemplating the delivery of similar types of online courses where it is important that students have access to the same versions of operating systems and applications.

    View record details
  • Developing and introducing courses on testing and quality assurance

    Joyce, D.; Young, A. (2008)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper reviews the processes involved in developing level 6 and 7 courses on testing and quality assurance. These processes include having the initial idea, conducting market research, deciding to proceed, forming a development team, gathering data, deciding levels and prerequisites, identifying resources, obtaining approvals, and marketing to students. The paper also reflects on the learnings gained from the experience of delivering the level 6 course for the first time.

    View record details
  • Facilitating learning by using case studies

    MacGregor, A.; Nesbit, T. (2008)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    A number of issues can result in institutions seeking alternatives to industry based capstone projects in the final semester or year of three year qualifications in information and communications technology (ICT), whether they be three year degree programmes or diploma programmes such as the level 7 Diploma in Information and Communications Technology (DipICT – Level 7), formerly called the National Diploma in Business Computing (NDBC). One issue documented has been large numbers of international students as documented by a number of writers including Chard and Wempe (2004), Baker and Nesbit (2006). The issue giving rise to this paper is where a small institution has built links with industry based clients through the offering of DipICT Level 7 projects, but due to a decline in student numbers has ceased the offering of the DipICT Level 7 programme. There was however a desire to maintain the relationships that had been built with the industry based clients. The aim of this paper is to investigate the pitfalls and promise of using client case studies in a simulated work environment to fulfil learning outcome requirements in DipICT Level 6 courses so that these relationships can be maintained with industry based clients. The framework used is small classes, full work days, multiple courses being taught at the same time and multiple clients. The framework used is described. A trial implementation is reported on, and feedback analysed from client, student, tutor and administrative views. Given this feedback, modifications to the process are suggested. The paper then discusses whether there is promise for investigating using these methods in a larger situation.

    View record details