412 results for Conference item, 2010

  • Literacy in early childhood education.

    Hamer, J. (2010)

    Conference item
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Transforming minds for ethical leadership.

    Sahrawat, K. (2010)

    Conference item
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Building GLAMour: convergent practice in New Zealand public memory institutions.

    Wellington, S. (2010)

    Conference item
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Records management to complement organisational developments.

    Cossham, A. F. (2010)

    Conference item
    Open Polytechnic

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  • How to understand and build wellbeing in organizations: Insights from positive psychology.

    Jarden, A. (2010)

    Conference item
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Building positive psychology research projects.

    Jarden, A. (2010)

    Conference item
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Blended learning : the BEST we can do?

    Nichols, M. (2010)

    Conference item
    Open Polytechnic

    Blended learning' seems the latest term claimed by e-learning advocates. While it is clear that complementing face-to-face education with e-learning (which is how many understand the term 'blended') can result in benefits to learners, there are also significant challenges - and there is a danger that becoming 'blended' might be perceived as some sort of ultimate objective. This presentation considers the role 'blended learning' has had at Laidlaw College (formerly the Bible College of New Zealand), and suggests that becoming 'blended' was an institutionally useful yet pedagogically incomplete objective. Making real improvements to learning in formal education relies not on blending communication media or adding online discussion to on-campus meetings, but on adopting specific pedagogical approaches that do not necessarily require 'blended' media. Two specific frameworks for formal education are highlighted, both of which provide a context for 'blending'.

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  • Training the whole people of God through extension education and online learning

    Nichols, M. (2010)

    Conference item
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Social enterprise dynamics - NZ context.

    Awan, N. (2010)

    Conference item
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Understanding archives: What people (don't) know and how archivists can learn from this.

    Welland, S. (2010)

    Conference item
    Open Polytechnic

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  • 21st century psychological research - the international wellbeing study.

    Jarden, A. (2010)

    Conference item
    Open Polytechnic

    Looks in depth at peoples� wellbeing from around the world, particularly psychological aspects that contribute to wellbeing, and how wellbeing changes over time.

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  • Should critical literacy be a part of early childhood education in New Zealand?

    Hamer, J. (2010)

    Conference item
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Skills development.

    Seelig, C. (2010)

    Conference item
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Older workers and technology: Learning opportunity or learning barrier.

    Bourke, J.; Bourke, D. (2010)

    Conference item
    Open Polytechnic

    Older workers are often stereotyped as reluctant learners, and particularly unable to adapt to new technology. Yet both research and empirical evidence suggest that this stereotyping is not valid. Older workers have already adapted to significant societal and workplace changes during their lives. They now must deal with the crisis associated with age-based cohorting often by either withdrawing from opportunity or losing confidence in their own abilities. If age is used as the limiting factor then older workers will be denied training in technology. Consequently, older workers will be denied positions where technology skills are important. Such discrimination adds to the problem of digital divide. It also distracts the debate from the real issues surrounding the securing and developing of a competent workforce. Workplace education and training is about developing workforce skills. It recognizes that managers cannot expect optimal performance in a changing world unless investment is made in developing workers hand-in-hand with investment in technologies. The limiting factors in developing workers are attitude and aptitude, not age. Demographic studies signal increased longevity, with resulting stress on affordability of pensions. The response is to increase the pension eligibility age. The workforce will be obliged to accommodate older workers as they seek to secure a living. Therefore, as producers and consumers, older workers can only remain valuable economic contributors if managers remove the age barrier to technology training. There is a huge opportunity for managers to harness the change assimilation experience of older workers if attitude and aptitude are employed as the deciding factors for training and advancement. This paper uses a personal narrative approach, based on the experiences of the authors in New Zealand, to demonstrate how attitude and aptitude have driven their skills development in the uses of technology. The authors, now older workers, have taken office evolution from manual typewriters to high-speed laptops in their stride, and are looking forward to the day when voice activation actually works. They have enjoyed management practices in diverse workplaces that encouraged development, have responded accordingly, and claim modestly that both they and their employers benefited. Over four decades their managers almost invariably employed a partnership approach, seeking to meld individual staff skills, with no apparent concern for age. The authors believe that if managers succumb to an aged-based stereotype and deny older workers opportunity to develop technology skills, then they will increase economic risk all workers, their employing organisations and society generally.

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  • Developing research and presentation skills in post graduate students

    Joyce, D.; Blackshaw, R.; Young, A. (2010)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    In this paper, techniques used with postgraduate computing students to develop research, analysis and presentation skills are explained and their success is evaluated. Several different techniques are used with students entering post graduate study at different levels. The courses at each level and the research forums are described and analysed.

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  • Assessing with a unit test framework: variations of approach

    Lance, M.; Sarkar, A.; Bian, R. (2010)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This work describes two different uses of a Unit Testing Framework for automated marking of programming assignments. Usually unit testing focuses on verifying the correctness of individual methods. Here we firstly show how to use unit tests to give novice programmers feedback as they learn how to code simple data-centric Creation, Retrieval, Updating and Deletion (CRUD) tasks. Following this there is an explanation of how advancing novice programmers can be guided to create robust methods in a complex system through the feedback from automated acceptance tests. These are novel variations of the standard use of unit tests for automatic assessment of programming assignments and showcase the possibilities for vocational focused programming courses.

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  • Leadership in ICT organizations: skills or experience?

    Asgarkhani, M.; Wan, J. (2010)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Today, access to information and communication technologies (ICTs) plays an essential role in both economic and social development. A diverse portfolio of ICT solutions is contributing towards a significant change in corporate business processes worldwide. ICT organization leadership is essential for setting up competitive businesses, managing global corporations, adding business value and providing valued products and/or services to their potential markets. Successful ICT organization leaders need to use a mix of technical skills, managerial skills and relevant management and technical experience so as to be able to provide effective leadership.

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  • Students as new settlers: the policy implementation gap

    McCarthy, C.; Yoo, Y. (2010)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Given that New Zealand is experiencing a lack of skilled labour in Information Technology (IT), and that this lack is increasing in direct proportion to ongoing technological development, the government is looking to immigrants to meet this shortfall. The purpose of this paper is to explore the issues surrounding the New Zealand Government’s stated preference for meeting this shortfall in skilled labour by having highly qualified international students as new settlers/new immigrants. What actually happens to these international IT students once they are here in New Zealand and how does the New Zealand IT job market match their needs with the needs of these potential new settlers?

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  • American influence on citizens through New Zealand commercial radio

    Reilly, B. (2010)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Emerging consensus tends to suggest there is overwhelming American dominance of New Zealand radio in music. This study sets out to enquire on such claims by looking at music, and enquiring on its effect on citizens and their engagement and creation of culture. There is evidence emerging that indicates a mixture of American as well as British influence. Foreign influence in the radio scene has been apparent since the time it became a popular addition to the New Zealand household in the 1920s. Over the following decades, the radio industry has turned to the dominant Anglo-American players for guidance and inspiration. Now with a maturing local industry that is becoming more confident in its own skin, this reliance on foreign industry is coming under question regarding its affect on the indigenous population. We set out to question which theory best describes the new landscape that the radio industry finds itself in, and how this is affecting the production of content received by the listening public. Working within a framework of cultural imperialism and hybridity, the findings indicate where it is contrary to what has been simplistically alluded to as a simple mixture of global and local.

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  • Industry view of ICT roles and skills: needs in Canterbury

    Asgarkhani, M.; Young, A. (2010)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper elaborates on the ICT skills needs within both Canterbury region and New Zealand. ICTs play a crucial role in today’s knowledge-based economy. Organizations heavily rely on ICT solutions to develop and grow business. There is an increasing need for ICT skills within organizations – so as to benefit from the use of ICT tools and solutions. A focus group of industry representatives participated in this study – to identify the need for roles and skills within the ICT sector. It appears that there are consistencies in both the need for roles and the use of development platforms for the Canterbury region and all regions of New Zealand. That is to say, ICT qualifications designed to address national needs should address majority of ICT needs within the Canterbury region.

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