731 results for Conference item, 2011

  • Some aspects of knowledge engineering.

    Abhary, K.; Djukic, D.; Hsu, H-Y.; Kovacic, Z.; Mulcahy, D.; Spuzic, S.; Uzunovic, F. (2011)

    Conference item
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Managing operational continuity in disaster recovery: A case in academic delivery

    Clear, A.; Asgarkhani, M. (2011)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper elaborates on the experience related to planning approaches that were undertaken to continue delivery of Information and Communication Technologies qualifications at Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT) after the 22 February earthquake. It reflects on challenges, phases of planning for commencing delivery and key success factors.

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  • The Christchurch quake: Social networking as student support in disaster recovery

    McCarthy, D.; McCarthy, C. (2011)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Following the “Greendale Fault” Earthquake of 7.1 on 4 September, 2010 in Christchurch, New Zealand, students at the local Institute of Technology and Polytechnic (ITP) were significantly disrupted in their second semester. Occurring at 4.35am on the Saturday morning after only two weeks of courses, the ITP found itself cordoned off and part of an inner city curfew as older less well maintained buildings were reduced to rubble around it. Aftershocks continued but relatively little damage was sustained to the ITP’s buildings. Students and staff were unable to attend study or work, and the situation was rapidly changing from day to day. However, students were affected differently depending on their location at the time of the quake, their access to communication technologies such as cell phones, the Internet, and their personal circumstances. Then the entire situation repeated itself with the 6.3 “Lyttelton Fault” aftershock at 12.51pm on 22 February, 2011 disrupting Semester One on only the second day of the semester. This paper blends two qualitative methods, actor network theory (ANT) and narrative research to show the degree to which computing students accessed an online course to tell their stories, participate in social networking, and relied upon the School of Computing Moodle Student Info site in the recovery period immediately after the first disaster, and comparing this process over the “Greendale Fault” and the “Lyttelton Fault” events.

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  • Web-assisted learning: A review of planning and theory

    Clear, A.; Asgarkhani, M. (2011)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper elaborates on the outcome of the phase I of a research project (planning and theory of e-learning) that looks at theory of benefits and value of e-learning, planning to achieve perceived benefits and values. Phase II will compare the reality of the outcomes after implementation of e-Learning solutions versus planned outcomes. The paper covers some of the key issues web-assisted or e-learning through discussing the various stages (technologies) of e-learning solutions, potential benefits; the state of the e-learning industry; the barriers to introducing e-learning and building a model to assess strategic value of e-learning through web technologies. It concentrates on literature review, planning and theory mostly related to early 2000 when the e-learning phenomenon really emerged.

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  • Self and peer-assessment: a learner perspective

    Lopez, D.; Lopez, M.; Fourie, W.; Clarkson, D.; Marais, K. (2011)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Self and peer assessment aid learning and build capabilities that support lifelong learning. However, although both involve learner participation and are often discussed together, they are very different in some respects. This study contrasts learners’ experiences of peer assessment with that of self-assessment. It used a non-experimental post-test only design in which students enrolled in courses with both self-assessment and peerassessment components completed a questionnaire on their experiences. Survey questions were formed into four scales: value, learning, contrasting peer with self and concerns. Additional questions captured basic demographics and conceptions of learning. Participants believed that they learned more from peer assessment than from self-assessment. However, some felt it was not right for other students to mark their work and some felt uncomfortable with the responsibility of marking other’s work. Learners endorsed the notion that peer-assessment has a greater learning value than self-assessment and that they should be more involved in assessing other students. However, they also had concerns about the wider use of self and peer assessment and a minority was strongly opposed to their use.

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  • The fate of computing in research performance evaluations: ERA vs PBRF

    Clear, A.; Clear, T. (2011)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The prevailing ‘audit culture’ in national governments has seen a global proliferation of research performance evaluation schemes. Most recently the Excellence in Research for Australia (ERA) results have been published. The results from this bibliometrically based ranking exercise provide an interesting comparison with the earlier results from New Zealand’s Performance Based Research Fund (PBRF) exercise. With a focus on the computing disciplines this paper sets these developments in the global context; compares the outcomes under each scheme; the extent to which the prevailing publication cultures have been supported or undermined; the scope for such schemes to render whole sub-disciplines invisible and the potential impacts for the computing disciplines from such exercises.

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  • Differentiated instruction in technology education

    Prankerd, Sheena; Lockley, John (2011)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Differentiated instruction is the concept of teaching to individual students acknowledging their individual strengths, weaknesses and learning styles. The call for differentiated instruction classrooms is echoed in both an appreciation of students as individuals as well as at the systems level through results of international exit surveys such as the PISA study. Differentiated learning calls for a move away from an industrialist model of the classroom, where the same programme (instructional activities and assessment structures) are applied to all students, to a model where we consider learning and assessment programmes to suit individual learners needs. A move to differentiated instruction to allow differentiated learning to occur in the classroom has implications on school structures and vision, professional learning for teachers and teacher practice at the classroom and departmental levels. The role of assessment in teaching and learning is also critical in the functioning of a differentiated learning classroom. This paper discusses the factors involved in setting up a differentiated learning classroom and is supported by a presentation of classroom examples.

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  • Aging just is: Illuminating its that-being, how-being & what-being

    Wright St Clair, V (2011-10-14)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Duplicate of http://aut.researchgateway.ac.nz/handle/10292/2285

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  • The fate of computing in research performance evaluations: ERA vs PBRF

    Clear, A.; Clear, T. (2011)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The prevailing ‘audit culture’ in national governments has seen a global proliferation of research performance evaluation schemes. Most recently the Excellence in Research for Australia (ERA) results have been published. The results from this bibliometrically based ranking exercise provide an interesting comparison with the earlier results from New Zealand’s Performance Based Research Fund (PBRF) exercise. With a focus on the computing disciplines this paper sets these developments in the global context; compares the outcomes under each scheme; the extent to which the prevailing publication cultures have been supported or undermined; the scope for such schemes to render whole sub-disciplines invisible and the potential impacts for the computing disciplines from such exercises.

    View record details
  • Managing operational continuity in disaster recovery: A case in academic delivery

    Clear, A.; Asgarkhani, M. (2011)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper elaborates on the experience related to planning approaches that were undertaken to continue delivery of Information and Communication Technologies qualifications at Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT) after the 22 February earthquake. It reflects on challenges, phases of planning for commencing delivery and key success factors.

    View record details
  • Web-assisted learning: A review of planning and theory

    Clear, A.; Asgarkhani, M. (2011)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper elaborates on the outcome of the phase I of a research project (planning and theory of e-learning) that looks at theory of benefits and value of e-learning, planning to achieve perceived benefits and values. Phase II will compare the reality of the outcomes after implementation of e-Learning solutions versus planned outcomes. The paper covers some of the key issues web-assisted or e-learning through discussing the various stages (technologies) of e-learning solutions, potential benefits; the state of the e-learning industry; the barriers to introducing e-learning and building a model to assess strategic value of e-learning through web technologies. It concentrates on literature review, planning and theory mostly related to early 2000 when the e-learning phenomenon really emerged.

    View record details
  • The Christchurch quake: Social networking as student support in disaster recovery

    McCarthy, D.; McCarthy, C. (2011)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Following the “Greendale Fault” Earthquake of 7.1 on 4 September, 2010 in Christchurch, New Zealand, students at the local Institute of Technology and Polytechnic (ITP) were significantly disrupted in their second semester. Occurring at 4.35am on the Saturday morning after only two weeks of courses, the ITP found itself cordoned off and part of an inner city curfew as older less well maintained buildings were reduced to rubble around it. Aftershocks continued but relatively little damage was sustained to the ITP’s buildings. Students and staff were unable to attend study or work, and the situation was rapidly changing from day to day. However, students were affected differently depending on their location at the time of the quake, their access to communication technologies such as cell phones, the Internet, and their personal circumstances. Then the entire situation repeated itself with the 6.3 “Lyttelton Fault” aftershock at 12.51pm on 22 February, 2011 disrupting Semester One on only the second day of the semester. This paper blends two qualitative methods, actor network theory (ANT) and narrative research to show the degree to which computing students accessed an online course to tell their stories, participate in social networking, and relied upon the School of Computing Moodle Student Info site in the recovery period immediately after the first disaster, and comparing this process over the “Greendale Fault” and the “Lyttelton Fault” events.

    View record details
  • Self and peer-assessment: a learner perspective

    Lopez, D.; Lopez, M.; Fourie, W.; Clarkson, D.; Marais, K. (2011)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Self and peer assessment aid learning and build capabilities that support lifelong learning. However, although both involve learner participation and are often discussed together, they are very different in some respects. This study contrasts learners’ experiences of peer assessment with that of self-assessment. It used a non-experimental post-test only design in which students enrolled in courses with both self-assessment and peerassessment components completed a questionnaire on their experiences. Survey questions were formed into four scales: value, learning, contrasting peer with self and concerns. Additional questions captured basic demographics and conceptions of learning. Participants believed that they learned more from peer assessment than from self-assessment. However, some felt it was not right for other students to mark their work and some felt uncomfortable with the responsibility of marking other’s work. Learners endorsed the notion that peer-assessment has a greater learning value than self-assessment and that they should be more involved in assessing other students. However, they also had concerns about the wider use of self and peer assessment and a minority was strongly opposed to their use.

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  • What constitutes good practice in teaching academic literacies?

    Kirkness, A (2011-08-26)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    In the multicultural student body at English-medium tertiary institutions today, teachers find that they can no longer make assumptions about student preparedness for tertiary learning. Many students do not have the academic literacy skills in English to enable them to learn effectively Thus the teaching of these skills needs to be included in discipline programmes. But who is to teach them, subject teachers or language teachers? If subject teachers, then how can they be given the additional support they need to promote language development in their teaching? If language teachers, then how can they ensure that they teach the literacy skills that the particular subject requires? This paper focuses on the various models used at the Auckland University of Technology to cater for the English language needs of students in different faculties. It discusses structures and processes that support the teaching of academic literacy skills as central to developing students’ ability to master their discipline. It presents models of language teachers delivering courses in academic literacy skills alongside the subject classes (adjunct course) and of subject teachers including academic literacy skills in mainstream programmes (integrated course). It identifies examples of good practice and formal and informal academic development events that arise in the design of courses with a dual focus on discipline content and language.

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  • Spatiotemporal Environments – Narratives of the underpaid worker in New Zealand

    Sinfield, D (2011-12-07)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    The International Conference on Interdisciplinary Social Sciences examines the nature of disciplinary practices, and the interdisciplinary practices that arise in the context of ‘real world’ applications. It also interrogates what constitutes ‘science’ in a social context, and the connections between the social and other sciences. In this project and conference presentation it moves concerns with narratives of underpaid work into spatiotemporal environments. Audio recordings of worker’s stories are fused with typographical treatments and imagery to produce a series of short films. The advantage of this approach is that these texts are more widely available and operate outside of the cultural exclusivity of the art gallery and the graphic design field. This is an international conference that has been running for 6 years which is organised by Common Ground Publishing. Each year this conference is held in various countries throughout the world and this year it will be held in New Orleans, USA. Speakers are also invited to publish their journal article (which is peer reviewed) with the publication associated with this conference.

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  • FULSOME: fuzzy logic for software metric practitioners and researchers

    MacDonell, SG; Gray, AR; Calvert, JM (2011-09-03)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    There has been increasing interest in recent times for using fuzzy logic techniques to represent software metric models, especially those predicting the software development effort. The use of fuzzy logic for this application area offers several advantages when compared to other commonly-used techniques. These include the use of a single model with different levels of precision for the inputs and outputs used throughout the development life-cycle, the possibility of model development with little or no data, and its effectiveness when used as a communication tool. The use of fuzzy logic in any applied field, however, requires that suitable tools are available for both practitioners and researchers-satisfying both interface- and functionality-related requirements. After outlining some of the specific needs of the software metrics community, including results from a survey of software developers on this topic, this paper describes the use of a set of tools called FULSOME (FUzzy Logic for SOftware MEtrics). The development of a simple fuzzy logic system by a software metrician and its subsequent tuning are then discussed using a real-world set of software metric data. The automatically generated fuzzy model performs acceptably when compared to regression-based models

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  • Deferred gratification', 'Wildcards' and 'Packaging': innovative teaching strategies for first year product design students

    Withell, AJ; Charlton, NB (2011-08-16)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    This paper describes a strategic approach to teaching design that addresses the difficulties of building and maintaining motivation and engagement in first year product/industrial design students, and creating the learning context in which they can come to terms with the ‘idea’ of the design process. The paper critically considers the observations and experiences of the authors during the co-delivery of the first-year studio course of the Bachelor of Product Design at Unitec, New Zealand. The success of the strategy is illustrated with reference to improving student work and learning outcomes. Student perceptions are used to help interpret these practical examples of learning, with reference to broader educational approaches. Product/industrial design students require a variety of approaches and teaching interventions that are particular to their interests, concerns and perceptions of self. Innovative strategies are required to ensure that a meaningful engagement with design process is achieved. The challenge for first year studio lecturers is to devise teaching methods that make palatable the need to accept ‘deferred gratification’ in terms of hard design outcomes, via a rich and engaging, but fundamental learning process. A number of teaching methods are presented that engage the principles of experiential and situational learning and that introduce students to a number of practical skills and conceptual insights. The delivery and structure of the studio programme is further underpinned by reflective learning practices and the creation of an environment conductive to an effective community of learning/practice. Through this approach, students are asked to consider the immediate value of learning self-awareness, and to see ‘learning’ as an important long term professional competency. Given New Zealand’s particular limitations regarding large scale manufacturing, the emphasis on independent but collaborative, transferable thinking skills is particularly important. The process is in this case far more significant as a learning outcome, as it equips students to be involved in a wide range of design related fields, but as a ‘non-tangible’ outcome is considerably more difficult to teach to students with a hands-on orientation.

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  • Curved layer fused deposition modeling in conductive polymer additive manufacturing

    Diegel, O; Singamneni, S; Huang, B; Gibson, I (2011-08-18)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    This paper describes a curved-layer additive manufacturing technology that has the potential to print plastic components with integral conductive polymer electronic circuits. Researchers at AUT University in New Zealand and the National University of Singapore have developed a novel Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) process in which the layers of material that make up the part are deposited as curved layers instead of the conventional flat layers. This technology opens up possibilities of building curved plastic parts that have conductive electronic tracks and components printed as an integral part of the plastic component, thereby eliminating printed circuit boards and wiring. It is not possible to do this with existing flat-layer additive manufacturing technologies as the continuity of a circuit could be interrupted between the layers. With curved-layer fused deposition modeling (CLFDM) this problem is removed as continuous filaments in 3 dimensions can be produced, allowing for continuous conductive circuits.

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  • What determines the location of equity trading? Evidence from stocks cross-listed in various markets

    Dodd, O (2011-12-12)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    We analyse the distribution of foreign trading volume of European stocks cross-listed on various stock exchanges and examine the factors that affect the distribution. We focus on the role of two sets of determinants: the stock exchange characteristics and the stock-specific factors. We find that a stock exchange’s ability to attract order flow of foreign equity is positively associated with its organizational efficiency, market liquidity, the regulations pertinent to the quality of investor protection and insider trading. Regulated stock exchanges are found to be more successful in attracting order flow of foreign stocks than non-regulated markets, such as OTC and alternative markets and trading platforms. Among the stock-level factors, the share of trading on a foreign exchange is higher for companies that are smaller, riskier and have low return correlation with the host market returns. It is also evident that the share of foreign trading volume of stock is higher when the currencies of host and home markets are the same and the share increases with the duration of a listing.

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  • The benefits of training

    Poulston, J (2011-08-08)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    This study assesses whether hospitality employees consider workplace training is adequate and identifies management’s view on the importance of training. Links between inadequate training and problems such as sexual harassment, unfair dismissals, under-staffing, poor food hygiene, and theft are also identified. Results indicate that hospitality employees are commonly required to work without sufficient training, and that training has a positive effect on employee relations by reducing workplace problems and improving staff retention.

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