691 results for Conference item, 2014

  • Knights and knaves: Proposed criminal liability for directors under New Zealand law.

    Barrett, J. (2014)

    Conference item
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Equity in the amoral state: The nexus between charities, gambling and the taxation-redistribution system.

    Barrett, J.; Veal, J. (2014)

    Conference item
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Tax rationality, politics and media spin: A case study of New Zealand’s failed ‘car park tax’.

    Barrett, J.; Veal, J. (2014)

    Conference item
    Open Polytechnic

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  • An online orientation to open, flexible and distance learning.

    Nichols, M. (2014-04)

    Conference item
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Reflections on research into the bibliographic universe

    Cossham, A. F. (2014)

    Conference item
    Open Polytechnic

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  • The (Mis)uses of Pierre Bourdieu’s practical epistemology in accounting-related social research

    Huang, G.; Baskerville, R.; Fowler, C. (2014-07)

    Conference item
    Open Polytechnic

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  • ICT tools for teaching.

    Karamat, P. (2014-01)

    Conference item
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Renovation as an alternative to MOOC disruption.

    Nichols, M. (2014-04)

    Conference item
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Introducing the Open Polytechnic

    Green, J. S. (2014-07)

    Conference item
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Actor-network theory and sociological research.

    Hamlin, M. (2014-09)

    Conference item
    Open Polytechnic

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  • A comparative analysis of the retentions strategies employed along the disaggregated value chain at Open Polytechnic and Korea National Open University.

    Green, J. S. (2014-07)

    Conference item
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Panel discussion: Writing for publications, journals and PhDs.

    Barrett, J.; Loveridge, J.; Meade, A.; Mersham, G. M.; Nichols, M. (2014-05)

    Conference item
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Professional collaboration and inclusive practices: Working effectively with outside agencies to enable improved provision and transparent services for children and families across early childhood settings.

    Alderson, J.; Kenny, D. (2014)

    Conference item
    Open Polytechnic

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  • The game’s the thing: Levelling up from novice status

    McCarthy, D P.; Oliver, R. (2014)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Quality computer engineering education is integral to the recruitment, retention, and employment of quality software engineers, as part of enabling a greater uptake of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) careers. The introductory programing course DICT440 uses Build Your Own Blocks (BYOB) and the team creation of a game, Theseus and the Minotaur, to teach introductory programing principles and skills. This paper argues that creativity is essential to innovation. Digital Games are being increasingly used in education and training internationally, as well as specifically in computer education. Aotearoa-New Zealand ITPs need to position themselves positively to leverage the creativity and motivation of software engineering students who are experienced gamers by developing games as part of teaching and learning software engineering. Computer game development courses can be developed collaboratively in a multi-disciplinary team, using appropriate learning theory, across ITPs in second and third year degree courses, in conjunction with regional game companies, alongside core business applications.

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  • Techniques for aligning IT education with industry demand

    Asgarkhani, M.; Clear, A. (2014)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Organizations rely increasingly on Information Technology (IT) solutions for day to day operations and as such IT solutions play a significant role in efficiency, effectiveness and innovation of processes in design, development and delivery of products and services. IT is a business enabler and has revolutionized the ways in which various sectors of the industry operate. Various reports and published research suggest that worldwide, IT skills are in short supply and high demand. Universities and other tertiary institutions play a key role in developing skilled IT workforce to meet these skills shortages. The use of most IT solution platforms is global. If language and cultural issues (that can potentially impact nature of design) we put aside, skills related to solution development processes and technology deployment are mostly common worldwide. IT is now a global industry. Therefore it is critical to align skills development strategies adopted within educational programs (offered by educational institutions) with realistic and relevant needs for the global market. Tertiary educational institutions make use of a variety of techniques and frameworks for aligning their programs with IT skills needs. Based on review of cases and previous research, this paper presents an overview of techniques deployed by tertiary educational institutions to ensure relevance and currency of their programs for developing skilled IT workforce.

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  • Exploring the application of agile principles to tertiary computing education

    Proctor, M.; Atkins, C.; Mann, S.; Smith, L.; Smith, H.; Trounson, R.; Sutton, K.; Benson, N.; Dyke, S.; McCarthy, C.; Otto, M.; Nicoll, C. (2014)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper defines a proposed set of Agile Principles for Tertiary Computing Education as developed through an Agile Education workshop held during the annual Computing South Island Educators’ (CSIE) forum. The purpose of the workshop was to explore innovative and ‘Agile’ approaches that have been used within our South Island institutions to consider whether the principles of Agile development could be usefully applied or adapted to tertiary computing education. Each case study was analysed to determine alignment with Agile principles and emerging themes in the application of these principles to tertiary computing education were identified and discussed. This led to the development of a proposed set of Agile principles for tertiary computing education to support the development of computing courses, course components and programmes. Meaningful learning has emerged as a key factor for further exploration

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  • Improving existing resources for interactive learning activities using tablets and touch screens

    Robson, D.; Kennedy, D. (2014)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    As creating resources for interactive technology-based learning activities can be a huge task, we investigated how existing resources can be used and modified. Data were collected from students, observer, and teacher for several problems in a mathematics course on a computing degree that were part of interactive learning activities using touch screen technologies. It was found that existing problems could become effective resources in these activities simply by modifying them with suitable formatting, and that locating related elements together helped students start a problem. However, it is also important that pedagogical principles are followed.

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  • Fostering online student interaction using the OB3 web application for online study

    Daellenbach, R.; Davies, L.; Kensington, M.; Tamblyn, R. (2014)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The School of Midwifery at CPIT in Christchurch is undertaking an action research study on midwifery students and blended learning that commenced in 2010. This paper focusses on one aspect of this research which is the student’s experience of social isolation whilst working through the online component of the blended delivery. In response the teaching team initiated an intervention as a result, and replaced the existing content authoring software tool with a system that enables students to engage and interact with each other more effectively. We subsequently adopted the OB3 web application which has ameliorated this problem to a large extent. This paper sets out to explain why the OB3 web application was chosen and what effect this has had in terms of the student’s learning and the educators’ teaching experiences. Keywords: Asynchronous discussions, blended learning, cooperative learning, online learning

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  • Computer gaming and the positive effects on mental health

    McCarthy, C. M.; McBrearty, B. (2014)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    In 1970 a popular New Zealand student capping show was entitled “1 in 5” based on the then common expression “1 in 5 of us is mad”. In 2011 the New Zealand Mental Health reported exactly the same mental health statistics; 41 years on nothing had changed. However, other changes had taken place during that time – the advent of and continued development of the computer game. This poster paper explores the direct correlation between computer gaming and mental health and, in particular, the positive effects of computer gaming on mental health.

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  • Techniques for aligning IT education with industry demand

    Asgarkhani, M.; Clear, A. (2014)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Organizations rely increasingly on Information Technology (IT) solutions for day to day operations and as such IT solutions play a significant role in efficiency, effectiveness and innovation of processes in design, development and delivery of products and services. IT is a business enabler and has revolutionized the ways in which various sectors of the industry operate. Various reports and published research suggest that worldwide, IT skills are in short supply and high demand. Universities and other tertiary institutions play a key role in developing skilled IT workforce to meet these skills shortages. The use of most IT solution platforms is global. If language and cultural issues (that can potentially impact nature of design) we put aside, skills related to solution development processes and technology deployment are mostly common worldwide. IT is now a global industry. Therefore it is critical to align skills development strategies adopted within educational programs (offered by educational institutions) with realistic and relevant needs for the global market. Tertiary educational institutions make use of a variety of techniques and frameworks for aligning their programs with IT skills needs. Based on review of cases and previous research, this paper presents an overview of techniques deployed by tertiary educational institutions to ensure relevance and currency of their programs for developing skilled IT workforce.

    View record details