385 results for Conference item, 2015

  • He rongo i te reo rauriki, i te reo reiuru – Discourse analysis and conversations of historical conservation in New Zealand newspapers

    Whaanga, Hēmi; Wehi, Priscilla M. (2015-11-23)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Biocultural conservation encompasses all forms of diversity: biological, cultural and linguistic. This requires the nurturing of human cultures, customs, languages, knowledge, and the plants and animals on which they depend. The current biodiversity crisis in Aotearoa and worldwide has led to wide ranging debate about environmental management and the cost of conservation. For Māori, however, much more than species diversity is at stake. In Te Ao Māori, people are linked directly to flora and fauna through whakapapa (ancestry). As such, conservation can be viewed, not in terms of preserving ‘otherness’, but in terms of preserving ‘us-ness’: our very selfhood. We use discourse analysis to examine the concept of ‘conservation’ in 19thC Aotearoa, and how this is perceived by Māori communities in particular. To investigate these relationships, we deconstruct and re-examine the notion of conservation and the range of interpretations associated with it that are evident in both Māori and English language newspapers published between 1840s and the early part of the 20thC. We highlight discussion of species that we have identified as culturally significant from an analysis of whakataukī, ancestral sayings that are an important part of Māori oral tradition. Our analyses focus on the complex inter-relationships between language, society and changing conservation thought in Aotearoa in the late 19th century, and how Māori society engaged with this concept.

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  • Māori Astronomy and Matariki

    Whaanga, Hēmi (2015-12-02)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Presented at the Māori Astronomy and Matariki to Year 10 Hamilton Girls’ High School Camp.

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  • Trends and age profile of 0–24 year olds hospitalised with gastroenteritis

    Oben, Glenda; Simpson, Jean (2015-11)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    Background Hospitalisations for gastroenteritis have been increasing internationally. New Zealand rates were 6.0 per 1,000 0–14 year olds in 2006–2010. Yet hospitalisation for gastroenteritis is potentially avoidable. For example, rotavirus is one of the main causes of gastroenteritis hospitalisation of under 5 year olds. In New Zealand, rotavirus accounted for 1 in 52 children being hospitalised before they were three years. The introduction of the rotavirus vaccine in the US reduced the hospitalisation rate of children. Aim To determine overall and age-specific rates of gastroenteritis hospitalisation of 0–24 year olds in New Zealand and identify the ages at greater risk. Methods A retrospective analysis of acute and semi-acute in-patient hospitalisations of 0–24 years with a primary diagnosis of gastroenteritis extracted, for the period 2000–2014, from the National Minimum Dataset. Results During 2000–2014, the gastroenteritis hospitalisation rate increased from 3.6 per 1,000 0–24 year olds (n=5,028) in 2000 to 5.3 per 1,000 (n=8,151) in 2014. The highest rates were for 0–4 year olds, and in particular those under two years of age. Non-specific gastroenteritis (45.7%), viral enteritis (32.9%), and nausea and vomiting (presumed non-infectious; 15.5%) were the predominant forms of gastroenteritis diagnosed as the reason for hospitalisation. Those aged under one year had the highest hospitalisation rates for the various forms of gastroenteritis, with the exception of rotavirus where the highest rates were for one year olds. Conclusion In New Zealand, hospitalisation rates of gastroenteritis have been increasing since 2000, particularly for 0–4 year olds. The high rates for those under two years is consistent with other research. The highest hospitalisation rates were associated with non-specific diagnoses, particularly notable within viral diagnoses, where‘other viral enteritis’ increased while the rotavirus and norovirus rates appeared stable.

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  • Pinch Analysis of an Industrial Milk Evaporator with Vapour Recompression Technologies

    Walmsley, Timothy Gordon; Walmsley, Michael R.W.; Neale, James R.; Atkins, Martin John (2015-08-24)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    The present study focuses on applying Pinch Analysis to an industrial milk evaporator case study. Modern milk evaporators are typically integrated using both mechanical and thermal vapour recompression technologies as the primary means for attaining a high level of energy efficiency. A significant step change in energy efficiency for milk evaporators is achieved in this study by modifying the set-up of the concentration processing pathway in combination with an improved heat exchanger network design. To effectively perform the Pinch Analysis, a validated mass and energy balance model of the milk evaporator case study has been implemented in an Excel spreadsheet from which appropriate stream data may be extracted. In particular the Grand Composite Curve plays a critical role in identifying where vapour recompression units, which are a type of heat pump, may be applied to reduce thermal energy use by as much as 67%, which represents an annual utility cost saving between $640 – 820k /y.

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  • Qualitative telephone interviews: Strategies for success

    Farooq, Muhammad Bilal (2015)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    The use of the telephone in qualitative interviews is discouraged by traditionalists who view it as an inferior data collection instrument. However these claims have not been supported by empirical evidence and qualitative researchers who have used and compared the telephone to the face-to-face mode of interviewing present a different story. This study attempts to build on the limited existing research comparing the issues involved and the data collected using the telephone and face-to-face interview modes. The study evaluates the criticisms of traditionalists in the light of existing research. The study then presents the observations of the researcher based on a research project that involved 43 telephone, 1 Skype and 6 face-to-face interviews. These observations as well as the limited prior research are used to develop strategies for the effective use telephone interviews in qualitative research. The study concludes that for certain studies the telephone if used with the strategies recommended here provides qualitative researchers with a sound data collection instrument.

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  • Adding content reporting to DSpace

    Schweer, Andrea; Barr, Jenni; Congdon, Deirdre; Symes, Megan (2015)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    This poster presents a content reporting add-on to DSpace, developed for AgResearch Ltd by the IRR support team at the University of Waikato's Information Technology Services Division. We outline the motivation for developing this add-on, give a high-level description of its implementation and report initial insights on its reception and uptake.

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  • Equal partners? Improving the integration between DSpace and Symplectic Elements

    Miller, Kate; Murdoch, Craig; Schweer, Andrea (2015)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    While self-submission by academics was regarded as the ideal way to add content to Open Repositories in the early days of such systems, the reality today is that many institutional repositories obtain their content automatically from integration with research management systems. The institutional DSpace repositories at Auckland University of Technology (AUT) and at the University of Waikato (UoW) were integrated with Symplectic Elements in 2010 (AUT) and in 2014 (UoW). Initial experiences at AUT suggested a mismatch between the interaction options offered to users of Symplectic Elements on one hand and the actions available to repository managers via the DSpace review workflow functionality on the other hand. Our presentation explores these mismatches and their negative effects on the repository as well as on the user experience. We then present the changes we made to the DSpace review workflow to improve the integration. We hope that our experiences will contribute to an improvement in the integration between repository software and research management systems.

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  • The shift from the third way to neo-liberalism: An analysis of the 2010 amendments to the LGA

    Piercy, Gemma Louise; Mackness, Kate; Rarere, Moana; Madley, Brendan (2015)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    • The New Zealand Third Way context • The 2002 Local Government Act (LGA)Case study: OhiwaHarbour Strategy • 2010 and 2012 Amendments to the LGACase study: Social housing • Conclusion

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  • Development of mechatronic dibbling machine for improving the quality of forestry seedlings

    Duke, Mike; McGuinness, Ben; Künnemeyer, Rainer (2015-10-30)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    A forestry nursery in Tokoroa, New Zealand grows approximately 3 million Radiata pine seedlings per annum of which about 65% (2 million) are of suitable quality for forestry plantations. The high rejection rate of 35% was attributed to poorly trained, seasonal workers and unsophisticated equipment. It was estimated that about 22% of seedling rejection (approximately 220,000 per year) was due to poorly dibbled holes that caused bends in the stems. The bends occurred when planters pinched the stems of the seedlings in an attempt to make them vertical. A research and development project was undertaken to develop a mechatronic dibbling machine that could produce vertical holes of specified depth. The machine also had to produce 120,000 holes per day and be flexible with regard to spacing and size. The completed mechatronic dibbling machine was tested at the Tokoroa nursery and produced 98% of the holes at the required angle and 100% of useable depth. Harvesting, the following season, showed that the unwanted stem bends had been eliminated with a subsequent reduction in rejects. Furthermore, it was found that worker productivity increased by approximately 10% as they did not have to spend time setting seedlings vertically.

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  • Maori Flourishing in a Fast Changing World - Inaugural Professorial Address

    Nikora, Linda Waimarie (2015-11-17)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    A strong sense of who one is and that one’s life matters is vital to health and wellbeing. Without meaning and belonging many people, families and communities lie open to the risk of mental illness, addiction, transience, criminality, suicide and so on. In a rapidly changing social and technological environment where being Maori is enacted in the face of a dominant Pakeha majority, and in an increasingly diverse Maori world, staying well is an important challenge that we cannot underestimate or take for granted. There are many unwellness forces upon Maori in this fast changing world. Some are obvious and readily felt, others not so easy to apprehend or explain. Surveying almost 30 years of research, Professor Nikora will examine some of these unwellness forces and responses Maori make within the broader quest to remain indigenous and to flourish.

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  • Tū Māori Ake: Seeking which is above.

    Maxwell, Te Kahautu (2015-02-03)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Te Waka Āwhina 2015 Seeking that which is above Kaupapa - Philosophy o Aotearoa “Tū Māori ake” E ngā mana, e ngā reo, e ngā karangatanga, nei rā te powhiri ki a koutou katoa ‘MĀ TE MĀORI, MŌ TE MĀORI’ Te Waka Āwhina o Aotearoa National Training Hui by Māori for Māori within local government Āwhea: 2 – 4 February 2015 Ki whea: The Gallagher Academy of Performing Arts, The University of Waikato, Hamilton Hau kāinga: Te Puku o te Ika.

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  • The "illegality exception" reconsidered

    Liao, Zhixiong (2015-08-17)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    This paper is to reconsider and raise doubts over the seemingly prevailing view that illegality in the underlying contract for international trade should be accepted as an exception to the autonomy principle of documentary letters of credit. It argues that there are logical flaws in the “illegality exception” arguments. Contrary to the seemingly prevailing view, this paper suggests that where classic commercial documentary letters of credit for international trade are involved, the “illegality exception” would much less likely than expected to be accepted, especially in most common law jurisdictions. It also submits that the public policy concerns over (the facilitation of) illegal transactions in international trade could be better addressed by specific statutory provisions rather than by an ill-founded and loosely formulated “illegality exception”.

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  • Better than Biggles: Michael Annesley’s ‘Lawrie Fenton’ spy thrillers.

    Bydder, Jillene (2015)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Captain F.A.M. Webster, the athlete, athletics coach and author who lived from 1886 to 1949, wrote a series of fifteen spy thrillers under the pseudonym of Michael Annesley. His hero, Lawrie Fenton, is a lively and laid-back secret agent for the fictional Intelligence Branch of the (British) Foreign Office. The books were published between 1935 and 1950, and the series is important because of its European settings, analyses of contemporary politics, insights into contemporary points of view, and snapshots of events and places. Fenton was a new and exciting hero for his times. The paper establishes Webster’s unrecognized but important influence on the development of the spy thriller. The photographs are from the Webster family collection.

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  • Theoretical Basis of assembling structures in the Rayleigh Ritz Method

    Ilanko, Sinniah (2015)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    The use of negative structures in modelling cavities was discussed in previous symposia [1-3]. A formal proof that the use of negative structures to remove corresponding positive structural components in calculating natural frequencies has been established for discrete systems. This approach introduces extra spurious modes and methods of identifying and eliminating these modes have also been studied for the same. However, a corresponding proof for continuous systems, and its application poses some challenges. The focus of. this paper is on these challenges.

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  • A scientometric analysis of 15 years of CHINZ conferences

    Nichols, David M.; Cunningham, Sally Jo (2015)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    CHINZ is the annual conference of the New Zealand Chapter of the Special Interest Group for Computer-Human Interaction (SIGCHI) of the ACM. In this paper we analyse the history of CHINZ through citations, authorship and online presence. CHINZ appears to compare well with the larger APCHI conference on citation-based measures. 42% of CHINZ papers were found as open access versions on the web.

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  • The nuts and bolts of scent detection

    Edwards, Timothy L. (2015)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    In this tutorial, the basic requirements and ideal conditions for successfully training, evaluating, and deploying animals for scent-detection tasks will be outlined. Fundamental chemical and environmental factors that influence scent detection will be described, as will some factors to consider when selecting species and strains for this work. Because operational scent detection often involves detection of a variety of odor combinations, training requirements are similar to those for concept formation, which has important implications for selection of training samples. These and other considerations related to sample presentation will be discussed. Common training methods for both “discrete-trial” and “free-operant” scent-discrimination tasks will be presented and critical components of training highlighted. Evaluation of the scent-detection accuracy of animal detectors is a critical step prior to and during operational deployment. Some key features of precise estimation of performance will be discussed followed by a description of some operational deployment scenarios and features that are more and less conducive to success. Finally, common challenges associated with scent-detection work and some methods of overcoming the challenges will be presented for discussion.

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  • Translated application interfaces - issues of engagement

    Mato, Paora James (2015)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    In New Zealand, English is the language that dominates contemporary technologies. Usability testing was completed on a range of applications, available with a Māori-language interface, to gauge levels of awareness, engagement and perception. Nearly all of the respondents were unaware of the availability of these interfaces but most indicated they would prefer to use the Māori-language versions. In terms of engagement and usability, users initially engaged using Māori but switched to English when they wanted to quickly complete the task at hand. Few remained fully engaged with the Māori-language interfaces. High levels of language switching were reported and some frustration as the participants encountered new and unfamiliar uses of words. At face value the feedback suggests the translated interfaces contained unnecessary complications and that better design and content might have enhanced the user experience. However, there is evidence that extended use would enable users to become more familiar with the interfaces alluding to initial barriers created by a previous competence in another language -- in this case English. With this previous competence in mind it might be more useful to employ design concepts that would alleviate initial difficulties and serve to keep the user engaged in the target language for longer periods of time.

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  • Simulating electricity consumption pattern for household appliances using demand side strategies - a review

    Ozoh, Patrick; Apperley, Mark (2015)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    This paper investigates research work related to the modelling and simulation of household electricity consumption with a view to developing a simulation to evaluate the effectiveness of demand-side management mechanisms. The eventual aim of the research is to be able to model household consumption down to the level of individual appliance use in order to explore and assess the impact of different demand-side strategies, both in individual household consumption, and on overall grid balance. The focus of this paper is to survey relevant research on simulation of household consumption, potential demand-side strategies and their impact, and modelling techniques for residential consumption. From this review, the paper provides a number of pointers for future effort in the area of modelling the impact of demand-side management strategies and techniques.

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  • Using Wikipedia for language learning

    Wu, Shaoqun; Witten, Ian H. (2015)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Differentiating between words like look, see and watch, injury and wound, or broad and wide presents great challenges to language learners because it is the collocates of these words that reveal their different shades of meaning, rather than their dictionary definitions. This paper describes a system called FlaxCLS that overcomes the restrictions and limitations of the existing tools used for collocation learning. FlaxCLS automatically extracts useful syntactic-based word from three millions Wikipedia article and provides a simple interface through which learners seek collocations of any words, or search for combinations of multiple words. The system also retrieves semantically related words and collocations of the query term by consulting Wikipedia. FlaxCLS has been used as language support for many Masters and PhD students in a New Zealand university. Anecdotal evidence suggests that the interface it provides is easy to use and students have found it helpful in improving their written English.

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  • Designing an e-portfolio environment for assessment of a collaborative technology project

    Edwards, Richard (2015)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    E-portfolios can be used to record both the development process and the outcomes of technology design projects. Preparation of an appropriate e-portfolio environment, including the choice and set-up of the software, provision of both formal and informal support, and alignment with the assessment task, all require deliberate attention to design principles. This paper draws from the literature to identify important design considerations for an e-portfolio environment being used in an investigation of the feasibility of using e- portfolios for assessing individual performance in a collaborative technology project. It explores similar e- portfolio development projects and theoretical positions to develop a set of specifications and key considerations as a framework for the current project and as a contribution to ongoing discussions in this area.

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