248 results for Conference item, 2016

  • [Keynote] Feeling in / out of place: Queer geographies of belongings

    Johnston, Lynda (2016)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Thank you for this opportunity to be part of your day. It’s a real honour to be here. I am excited by the theme ‘welcoming diversity’ as it sums up my approach to my professional and personal life. I have a long standing research interest in gender and sexual diverse people and places. At the heart of my approach is a commitment to a politics of difference. My presentation today will highlight this diversity at the levels of our bodies, communities, regions, and globally. I am going to give you a snap shot of research I have conducted over the past couple of decades that connects welcoming (or not welcoming) diversity with embodied feelings of being in / and or / out of place.

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  • 'You can't use that bathroom': Transgendering public toilets

    Johnston, Lynda (2016)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    This presentation discusses transgender people’s experiences of public toilets. I draw on interviews from my research project ‘Gender Variant Geographies’ to consider the costs of binary gendered – male and female - bathrooms. When public space is rigidly gendered, access and use is a concern for trans and/or gender non-conforming people. There are many gender variant bodies that do not fit a two sex model. There are also people who exhibit gendered characteristics that do not align with the expected performances of their sexed body. I report on findings from interviews with over 20 participants who were asked about their experiences of public toilets. Hostile reactions towards gender transgressions in bathrooms bring into stark relief the performative and material consequences of binary gender norms. Queer and transgender theories are used to analyse: first, ‘the bathroom problem’; second, cisgender privilege; and third, acts of policing gendered bathrooms and bodies.

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  • Illuminating Otago Heritage

    Brown, Allison; Delaborde, Emmanuel (2016)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    Poster introduction: Goal: Optimise the University Library's DAMS (Digital Asset Management System) workflows relating to ingest and curation of our digital collections. Issue: The standard ingest process for Islandora requires a separate ingest form per format. Solution: A single ingest process for different formats - re-use metadata from other databases e.g. MINISIS and Alma (see main Workflow) - provide a straightforward bulk ingest process (see Coingest) - establish ongoing syncing of metadata from other databases (see Cosync). Submitted paper abstract: The University of Otago Library is responsible for the curation of extensive New Zealand and other heritage collections, in particular, those housed within the Hocken Collections. The need to better curate and showcase these collections to the widest possible audience has informed the development of a digital preservation solution for all Library digital assets, including, but extending beyond these valued heritage items. This presentation will outline the Library strategy for building staff capacity and knowledge around (a) the preservation and curation of our digital assets, (b) the establishment of Curation Framework policies, and (c) the development of a Digital Asset Management System (DAMS). With attention shifting from access (the usual focus of repository requirements) to curation, the University of Otago Library has invested in developing a DAMS to curate digital objects using Fedora Commons / Islandora software, rather than other software currently in use (for example DSpace and Omeka). Themes: Repositories and Cultural Heritage, Integrating with the Wider Web and External Systems, Managing Rights, Developing and Training Staff Audience: Repository Managers, Developers, Librarians, Archivists and anyone interested in digital curation.

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  • Constipation: A commonly costly complex condition

    Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Morris, Simon; Adams, Judith; Gallagher, Sarah; Simpson, Jean (2016-11)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

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  • Being open: timely access to NZCYES publications

    Gallagher, Sarah; Duncanson, Mavis; Simpson, Jean (2016-11)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

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  • What's for dinner? Relative and absolute differences in food prices

    Duncanson, Mavis; Boston, Grace; Parnell, Winsome; Simpson, Jean (2016-11)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

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  • Buildings as dangerous spaces: mobilities of emotion and affect in disaster relocation

    Adams-Hutcheson, Gail (2016)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Disasters are something Mimi Sheller has been recently working with, e.g. her keynote at the last Mobilities Symposium was entitled mobility in a disconnected world, moving people, information and aid after disasters. Disasters imply multitudes of varying mobilities and assemblages at different scales. Earthquakes also disrupt moorings, such as: pipes, roads, bridges, telephone and power cables, sewerage, gas lines and so on as well as buildings. Earthquakes roll and buckle the earth creating lasting and momentary upheavals, in turn causing inanimate objects, such as buildings to: jump, shudder, roll, collapse, lean, sway, bend, break and crack. This paper is linked to my PhD project on people who relocated out of Christchurch to Hamilton following the devastating 2010/2011 earthquakes and aftershocks In Christchurch, not only the ground moved through seismic motion, but people moved through internal/external migration (relocation) and they told moving stories imbued with emotion. I consider today the recentring of the corporeal body as an affective vehicle through which place and movement are sensed, particularly paying attention to embodied vibrations and how these are experienced at different times and in different spaces

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  • Pyrite geochemistry and textures in the epithermal Au-Ag mineralisation at Waihi

    Eames, A.G.; Barker, Shaun L.L.; Durance, P. (2016)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    The Waihi epithermal system is a low sulphidation epithermal system that hosts one of the largest high grade ore deposits in the Southern Hemisphere. The use of petrographic and EPMA analyses demonstrate there are distinctive textural zones within pyrite grains that vary in chemistry and appearance. Some of these zones contain elevated concentrations of Au and Te, and varying concentrations of Fe, S, Cu, Pb or Zn. The textural observations indicate that in some samples, pyrite growth was interrupted by periods of dissolution. Grains begin growth with overall low trace element concentrations, with the highest concentrations of trace elements occurring in the middle phase of the grain’s growth. Inclusions are rich in Pb, Ca, Se, Zn and Ni, and are attributed to the ‘dirty’ texture of some samples. Inclusion-rich areas are also high in Au. The nature of the presence of Te suggests either a single source of magmatic fluid, released in pulses, or periodical dilution of the magmatic fluid by meteoric waters.

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  • Supporting primary student independence in virtual learning: Investigating the role of school-based support staff

    Whalley, Rick; Khoo, Elaine G.L. (2016)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    This paper reports on the emerging findings of a small qualitative study investigating the role of school based support staff (hereafter referred to as SBSS) in supporting students to become independent virtual learners in the Virtual Learning Network Primary School (VLNP). The VLNP is a collaboration of schools throughout New Zealand providing virtual learning opportunities for their students in subjects that are not available in their own schools. The SBSS are staff members in the student’s home school who support and mentor the student during their time in the VLNP. Students that learn through the VLNP have varying levels of academic, technical and independent skills. In some schools SBSS assist students, however the expectations and degree of support varies from school to school. Two schools within the VLNP were used in this study. An interpretive qualitative methodology was adopted using individual semi-structured online interviews with the teachers, eteachers, principals and students at each of the case study sites. Grounded Theory was used to analyse the data. Eight key themes emerged to highlight the multiple roles that the SBSS importantly play in the VLNP. These include developing critical thinking, providing a wrap around approach, removing barriers to learning, providing opportunities, tuakana/teina: learning from each other, allowing students to take responsibility for their own learning, monitoring teaching and learning, and having administrative/managerial processes in place. The key findings in this study are of distributed support by all stakeholders and the importance of the role of the SBSS in coordinating this support.

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  • Changing parameters of consultation in local government: loss or gain for democracy?

    Mackness, Kate; Piercy, Gemma Louise (2016)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    A key tenet of the Resource Management Act (RMA) when enacted in 1991 was to provide for significant rights of public participation in decision-making processes in district and regional planning processes. The Local Government Act (LGA) when enacted in 2002 continued to extend the mechanisms for public participation in decision-making processes through partnership arrangements and a greater requirement to consult. These provisions recognise the interests of the general public and those specifically affected, as well as enhancing the quality of local decision making. We argue that the reforms to the LGA and the RMA since the election of the National-led government in 2008 have created a policy context where these public participation rights could be eroded. Our textual analysis of the amendments to the legislation demonstrates that the current National-led government’s pursuit of greater efficiency is resulting in reduced consultation under the RMA, and potential opportunities for erosion of public participation to occur under the LGA – although conversely, the greater flexibility also provided may generate new democratic opportunities.

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  • Soil recovery following landsliding at Whatawhata Research Station, Waikato, New Zealand: preliminary results

    Noyes, A.M.; Balks, Megan R.; Moon, Vicki G.; Lowe, David J. (2016-04-12)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    This research investigates soil recovery following landslides at the Whatawhata Research Station 20 km west of Hamilton. Six landslides were studied, ranging in age from pre-1953 to 2014. The landslides were divided into four zones: shear zones (mean of 25% of landslide area), intact accumulation zones (20%), transition zones (40%), and re-deposition zones (15%), along with a control. Soils were well developed in the control and intact accumulation zones and least recovered in the shear and re-deposition zones. Mean A horizon depths ranged from 2 cm in the shear and re-deposition zones to 7 cm in the transition zone, 17 cm in the intact accumulation zone, and 20 cm in the control. Mean soil carbon contents were lower (P<0.05) in the landslide zones (range of 3.2-5.2%) than in the controls (8.2%). Older landslides showed great recovery; however, the differences between zones within the landslides were greater than the differences between landslides.

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  • Speed control of small motors through the Ćuk Converter Topology

    Hutchins, Michael; Scott, Jonathan B. (2016)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    The Ćuk Converter offers simultaneous buck-boost operation, but requires careful design owing to its having a fourth-order transfer function and numerous practical design constraints. We exploit a serendipitous overlap between the converter circuit and the equivalent circuit of a dc motor to design a motor controller that can operate with supply voltage that is lower than the motor full-speed requirement. We examine the transfer function when such a topology is used to control the speed of a small motor. We conclude that the approach is relatively straightforward owing to the impact of the motor’s inductance. Measurements agree with theory.

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  • Precision crystal frequency reference disciplined using mains power

    Dirks, Sam; Scott, Jonathan B. (2016)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    We describe a clock that keeps time and provides a reference frequency with better than 1PPM accuracy, through a quartz crystal automatically calibrated via the power line frequency. The long-term precision of line-frequency-based time is used to correct the crystal-based timekeeping system, a process referred to as disciplining. A microcontroller calibrates the internal reference dynamically with no user assistance. Precision is improved to better than 1ppm as measured against a rubidium standard. The precise signal is useful for calibrating frequencybased instrumentation or keeping time without periodic correction and costs much less than comparable alternatives. The algorithm can be implemented in any mains-powered device using a microcontroller, such as thermostats and lighting timers. The prototype clock uses a Nixie-tube display, requires no transformer, is housed a glass tube, and is offered as an opensource design.

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  • Wireless power and network synchronisation for agricultural and industrial remote sensors using low voltage CMOS Harvesting and Data Demodulator IC

    Lee, T.; Kennedy, H.R.B.; Bodnar, R.A.; Scott, Jonathan B.; Redman-White, William (2016)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    This paper presents a wide area medium frequency loosely coupled magnetic energy harvesting system with power delivery and network synchronisation for remote sensors, intended for agricultural and industrial environments. Intended for situations with poor service access, power is supplied from a source via a large area loop. Receiver nodes may use ferrite cored coils for good efficiency with modest volume. Transmission of low bandwidth network synchronisation data permits very low operational duty cycle with the need for real time clocks or wake up receivers and their associated power drain. As a key enabler for the system, a full custom energy harvester and QPSK data demodulator IC has been designed and fabricated in a commercial 180nm CMOS technology. The IC occupies 0.54mm2 and can deliver 10.3µW at 3V to an external battery or capacitor. With standard MOS device thresholds the rectifier can start from cold with only 250mV peak from the antenna loop, and the battery charge output is delivered with 330mV peak input. Results are presented from laboratory evaluation and from preliminary measurements in the field with a 10m x 10m loop driven at 800kHz.

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  • The legitimate role of Rights Based Approaches to Environmental Conflict Resolution

    Daya-Winterbottom, Trevor (2016)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Rights based approaches to environmental conflict resolution should be viewed from the wider public law context. For example, Martin Loughlin maps the transition from a liberty focused constraint on law based on jurisdiction, to a rights focused approach to “intensive” judicial review based on legality. This sesismic shift away from common law (customary or practical) reasoning adopts a constitutional or statutory approach to describing liberties normatively using the “language of rights”, and builds upon the academic tradition that seeks to aid understanding by setting “forth the law as a coherent whole” and “reducing the mass of legal rules to an orderly series of principles”. This paper will explore and critically analyse the effect of these trends on environmental conflict resolution from a trans-national New Zealand perspective. The underlying thesis of this paper is that the possibilities and tensions experienced by the courts in crafting a principled approach to human rights jurisprudence provides a transparent methodology for determing polycentric issues, and that there is a legitimate role for rights based approaches to resolving environmental conflict.

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  • Guidebook for Rangitoto Island AQUA field trip, Auckland, 2016

    Lowe, David J.; Shane, Phil A.R.; de Lange, Peter J.; Clarkson, Bruce D. (2016)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Rangitoto is arguably Auckland’s most beautiful and omnipresent landscape feature. It is a symmetrical, ~6-km wide, basaltic shield volcano that last erupted ~550‒500 cal. yr BP (c. 1400‒1450 AD), not long after the arrival and settlement of Polynesians in the Auckland region (c. 1280 AD). It is by far the largest, and the youngest, volcano in the Auckland Volcanic Field (AVF). The AVF consists of approximately 53 individual eruptive centres, all of which are within the boundaries of the Auckland urban area. Recent research on cryptotephras (defined below) in sediments from Lake Pupuke on North Shore and in wetlands on Motutapu Island, and on a 150-m-long drill core obtained in February, 2014, has revealed that Rangitoto has a much more complex history that previously thought, and may be better viewed as a ‘volcanic complex with multiple episodes of eruptions’ (Linnell et al. 2016). In summary, (1) activity commenced c. 6000 cal. yr BP involving minor effusive and pyroclastic volcanism; (2) a voluminous shield-building phase took place from c. 650550 cal. yr BP (c. 13001400 AD), forming the main island ediface; and (3) the final phase of activity, from c. 550500 cal. yr BP (c. 14001450 AD), was explosive and less voluminous, producing scoria cones at the summit. The flora on Rangitoto is unique among the islands situated in the Hauraki Gulf because of the island’s young age, and the fact that technically Rangitoto is an ‘oceanic’ island. Its flora and fauna are derived entirely from long distance dispersal. The island contains some 582 vascular plant taxa of which 228 (39%) are indigenous. Various other special ecological features, and studies on plant succession and their drivers, make the island a truly fascinating place to visit. At this time of year, we should see many pohutukawa (Metrosideros excelsa) trees in flower.

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  • The detective and the Sagas: Erlendur in the novels of Arnaldur Indriðason

    Bydder, Jillene (2016-12)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Arnaldur Indriðason’s Erlendur novels are popular crime fiction stories set in Iceland. Detective Erlendur Sveinsson’s team deals with serious crimes, murders, and missing persons. Their cases are contemporary, but Indriðason has always said that he is influenced as a writer by the medieval Icelandic sagas. How is this illustrated by his crime fiction? The sagas, like crime fiction, contain stories of murder, revenge, love, loss and family conflicts. The paper uses examples from the novels and the sagas to examine the links between them. These links include the importance of traditional and local stories and the significance of fate. The paper also describes how Erlendur’s character develops over the series until he becomes an archetypical saga hero.

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  • Shakespeare and New Zealand: 1912-1916-1964

    Houlahan, Mark (2016)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    My paper will work away from the approach in my contributions to Christine Jansohn’s 2015 Shakespeare Jubilees: 1769-2014 and the forthcoming Shakespeare and Antipodal Memory, eds. Philip Mead and Gordon MacMullan (Bloomsbury Arden, 2016). Those chapters use the extensive archive illustrating New Zealanders remembering Shakespeare in the tercentennial year, 1916. Here I will contrast that archive with surviving records for Shakespeare pageants in 1912 and celebrations in Stratford, New Zealand for the 300th anniversary of Shakespeare’s birth. These years are linked by a concern for the performance or recreation of the idea of Shakespeare across a range of cultural forms. What kind of public memory do these activities serve? How can we contrast with, for example, the sacred rites of public memory that, in Australia and New Zealand, are entwined around Anzac day, April 25?

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  • Hamilton Fault Research

    de Lange, Willem P.; Moon, Vicki G. (2016-06-22)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Summary of progress on research into hidden faults within the Hamilton Basin

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  • Discussing future directions in the Maori legal environment

    Te Aho, Linda (2016)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    The next few years are likely to be exciting in terms of law changes, parliament getting ready for the next election cycle and the end of historical claims settlements. This presentation will look at the future of the Maori legal environment

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