5,588 results for Conference item

  • Is the economic crisis here worse than the US?

    Thomas, Rosita (2009-12-23)

    Conference item
    Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    This paper is an attempt to find out what impact an 'Economic Crisis' would have on New Zealand. The discussion would be centred on the various businesses in New Zealand, keeping the downturn in the finance sector as a focal point. As employees in educational institutions, would we be affected? It would be worthwhile to see what changes could occur if a crisis does occur in New Zealand

    View record details
  • Library website accessibility: a case study

    Parker, Ailsa (2010-01-08)

    Conference item
    Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    Libraries devote considerable time and expense to ensuring that disabled users can physically access the library. Is the same amount of thought, however, going into Web page development. Do sites provide support for technologies such as audio readers? Are they compliant with the W3C Web Accessibility Initiative standards? This presentation discusses Bobby, a free software that can quickly check for compliance; shares research results of testing the Web pages of New Zealand polytechnic libraries with Bobby; and compares the results with overseas research.

    View record details
  • Method or madness? The path to successful undergraduate research.

    Patrick, Rachel (2010-01-11)

    Conference item
    Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    This paper discusses the process undertaken to guide and support third year Diploma of Teaching (ECE) students through small research projects carried out during a practicum placement. From setting and defining their own topics, ethical considerations and data collection and analysis, students develop a sound understanding of research skills and processes. The structure and support systems provided have ensured that students and their practicum centres find the studies useful and relevant. A significant outcome from the research projects has been the enhancement of the critical thinking and analytical skills of students and their ability to apply the learning in their ongoing professional development as practising teachers.

    View record details
  • Cooperative learning: theory into practice

    Baker, Trish (2009-12-23)

    Conference item
    Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    At the 2008 IASCE/IAIE conference in Turin, Trish Baker and Jill Clark presented a model for using assessed cooperative learning techniques with ethnically and linguistically diverse groups. The model consisted of four steps: training lecturers in cooperative learning techniques, training students in cooperative learning techniques, monitoring the groups' performance, and debriefing both lecturers and students. This research paper and presentation reports on a New Zealand tertiary business course that piloted the model with culturally diverse student groups. Results from this pilot study suggest that the thorough preparation and monitoring of diverse student groups by a lecturer trained in cooperative learning techniques led to superior academic achievement and greater student satisfaction for most groups. Successful groups were able to identify the skills they had acquired from the cooperative experience, particularly the transferable skills. Not all groups, however, derived the full benefit from the use of the model. Issues of individual motivation, openness to feedback,and a lack of generic skills contributed to the comparatively poor performance of one of the groups. The results of this research project suggest that the challenges of implementing cooperative learning groups wih culturally and linguistically diverse groups may be met by ensuring that both lecturers and students follow the guidelines outlined in the model. This paper recommends further trialing of the model with a larger sample.

    View record details
  • Cooperative learning: a double edged sword

    Baker, Trish (2009-12-23)

    Conference item
    Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    Although there has been very little research done in co-operative learning in New Zealand, international research is positive about the educational benefits of working in culturally diverse groups. This paper presents the findings of a research project examining New Zealand experiences with co-operative learning in multicultural groups. The paper presents findings from surveys and focus groups with both domestic and international students and with New Zealand tertiary lecturers who use collaborative learning techniques in their programmes. The findings from this research indicate that there is a strong cultural conflict in the conceptualisation of cooperative learning between international students with little prior experience of cooperative learning and New Zealand lecturers who are often not fully prepared to help international students to bridge the gaps. The majority of international students value lecturers' programme content delivery and the achievement of high marks over the development of interpersonal skills; this is contrary to New Zealand lecturers' belief that the development of team skills is the most important outcome from cooperative learning. This cognitive dissonance reinforces the importance of understanding cultural differences and their impact on student patterns of classroom behaviour. This paper recommends that domestic and international students be prepared more effectively for cooperative learning and that lecturers be trained in designing curricula and assessment programmes that are pedagogically sound and culturally accommodating. The paper proposes a model to assist lecturers to achieve this aim.

    View record details
  • LATAR: A framework for paper design and lesson planning

    Haggerty, Carmel (2011-11-25)

    Conference item
    Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    This presentation introduces the LATAR framework along with seven principles and provides examples of using the framework for curriculum alighnment, paper development and lesson planning in the Health Faculty at Whitireia Polytechnic.

    View record details
  • Trailblazers - primary health care programme evaluation

    Holloway, Kathy (2009-12-23)

    Conference item
    Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    Trailblazers are those that forge the way to enable others to follow. This report is an evaluation of the academic journey undertaken by a group of newly graduated nurses who were sponsored by a New Zealand District Health Board (DHB) to work in a variety of primary health care nursing settings. The impetus for this pilot employment option was the Ministry of Health's focus on primary health care nursing and workforce development for this sector and the Expert Advisory Committee for primary health care nursing's recommendations to DHB's regarding employment of graduate nurses and support for them to engage in post graduate study. Evaluation participants were primarily the graduate nurses who were interviewed at the end of their first year of practice which was following programme completion then again nine to ten months later. Findings include the nurses reflections on what supported them and what acted to impede as barriers to their learning success and practice development. The report concludes with five recommendations that can be used to ensure that the travels of future newly graduated nurses taking this pathway are supported, safe and successful.

    View record details
  • We carry their stories: Narratives of cultural safety practice in day-to-day nursing practice

    Richardson, Fran (2009-12-23)

    Conference item
    Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    This paper discusses selected findings of a PhD research project. The research investigates the way registered nurses apply cultural safety knowledge in their day-to-day nursing practice.

    Cultural safety education sits within a critical framework and focuses on power relations in the delivery of health care. The concept grew out of the identity politics movements of the 1970s and 1980s. Identity politics asserts that individuals and groups have the right to claim an identity that is reflective of how they see themselves rather than how others see them. Identity politics asserts the right for marginalised individuals and groups to claim and occupy the same social, public and political spaces as their more dominant counterparts.

    Cultural safety was introduced into the New Zealand nursing curriculum in 1992 (Ramsden, 1993). Since that time little research has been undertaken which specifically explores how registered nurses apply cultural safety knowledge in their day-to-day practice. The focus of cultural safety is on how the nurse understands and works with power in the context of health care. It is about the nurse coming to understand how attitudes and beliefs shape, influence or affect the delivery of nursing and health care. Central to this understanding is the nurse's willingness to recognise notions of difference within health care relationships.

    This research uses a narrative approach to explore the question "the ways registered nurses apply cultural safety in their day to day nursing practice". It is through the researcher's interpretation of story that the qualitative experience of culturally safe nursing practice is illuminated. Narrative methodology informed the approach to interviewing sixteen registered nurses from a range of practice areas within New Zealand. The nurses were asked for stories about how they applied cultural safety knowledge in their day-to-day practice. It is how these stories were co - constructed, given meaning by the participants, and interpreted by the researcher which provided the data for analysis and discussion.

    This paper draws on selected stories of cultural safety in practice to highlight the multifaceted nature of cultural safety and reveals the complexity and multiple influences on the application of cultural safety knowledge in practice.

    The paper concludes with a summary of how this research might contribute to the development of new understandings about what cultural safety means as nursing moves further into the 21st century.

    View record details