63 results for Conference paper, CPIT Repository

  • mLearning and the workplace learner: Integrating mLearning ePortfolios with Moodle

    Chan, S.; Ford., N. (2007)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper reports on trials undertaken at CPIT to set up a support system for workplace based learning. A mlearning programme involves the use of a text messaging to disseminate summative and formative assessments. The use of mobile phones to take photos, videos, audio and text evidence of workplace skills being acquired to compile an eportfolio are also part of the trials. Evidence will be stored on Web 2.0 applications / personal portals and accessed by students via a course site set up using the content management system, Moodle.

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  • NESB students - COPing with BICT: one year on

    Nesbit, T.; McPherson, F. (2005)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the success of a special foundation programme that has been completed by some international students as their first semester’s study towards the Bachelor of Information and Communication Technologies degree at Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology. The findings are useful for evaluating the ongoing use of the special foundation programme and will be of use to other members of the NACCQ sector who are using or considering using a similar foundation programme.

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  • Making the transition - Year 13 computer studies at Burnside High School: a case study

    McCarthy, C. (2002)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper describes a process that provides a transition programme for senior high school students towards tertiary study in a vocational institution in preparation for a career in information and communications technology. The paper examines the case study of the introduction of this pilot project and follows the experiences of a cohort of students.

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  • m-learning for work based apprentices:- a report on trials undertaken to establish learning portfolios

    Chan, S. (2006)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper reports on ongoing work that is being completed on developing a mlearning delivery package for apprentice bakers. These include: - a report on trials of formative assessment questions using the mass text messaging (SMS) software eTXT , from New Zealand Telecom. - the evaluation of web 2.0 applications (Flickr , Filemobile , Springdoo etc) to collate, archive and organise eportfolios of workplace based assessment evidence using mobile phones to gather the evidence in the form of photos, videos or audio files - a summary of suggestions that can be used to construct a customised mlearning platform for use at CPIT - the blending of various aspects of distance and mlearning that will be used to support mobile phone based delivery of a New Zealand National qualification - a start at building a model for mobile learning pedagogy pertinent to workplace based learners.

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  • Becoming a baker:- from 'hopeful reactor' to' passion honer'

    Chan, S. (2007)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper focuses on emergent themes from interviews with young apprentice bakers. It is part of a larger study of how young people become bakers. The overall objective of the main study is to explore the apprenticeship journeys of young apprentices learning their trade in the New Zealand baking industry. This paper reports on interviews carried out with second year apprentices. It reveals that the majority of the apprentices in the study, who had taken on an apprentice due to lack of other choices, are gaining confidence in their abilities. This confidence is shown in their building passion for the trade and their growing commitment towards becoming bakers.

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  • How does enterpreneurship within rural tourism diversify rural ecomonies - Banks Peninsula - New Zealand?

    Cloesen, U. (2007)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Rural tourism is considered an economic alternative for farmers who are facing sinking profits and require additional income. This in turn can lead to an entrepreneurial response. The distinction between simple diversification and entrepreneurial response. The distinction between simple diversification and entrepreneurship takes place when seperate legal entities for new ventures are formed. Entrepreneurship is commonly defined as creating something of value from practically nothing (Timmons in Morrison et. al., 1999, p.10). It is the process of creating or seizing an opportunity, and pursuing it regardless of the resources currently personally controlled. this involves the definition, creation and distribution of value and benefits to individuals, groups, organisations and society at large. One example for this is the establishment of the first private rural walkway in New Zealand on Banks Penninsula.

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  • A history of avalanche accidents in Aotearoa New Zealand

    Irwin, D.; Owens, I. (2004)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper is based on a study for the New Zealand Mountain Safety Council which investigated the circumstances contributing to the deaths of 128 people in avalanches between 1863 and 1999. The study identified a trend of high fatalities during European settlement followed by a lull in fatalities early last century and then an increase in recent decades similar to other recently colonized countries. Similar to other studies, most victims were in their twenties and shift from work-to recreation-based activities has occurred from a century ago to recent times. Comparison with other studies of more specific activities involved in recent decades showed that alpine climbing, people on training courses and in area skiers and patrollers were over-represented while out of area ski/boarders and snowmobilers were under-represented. The geographic distribution of fatalities is concentrated in the South Island reflecting the preponderance of terrain for climbing and skiing.

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  • Research cultures under the microscope: three case studies

    Joyce, D.; Bridgeman, N.; Nesbit, T. (2005)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Committee on Computing Qualifications (NACCQ) offer computing degrees and are under pressure to grow their “research cultures” in order to maintain their degree accreditation. The three authors have experienced this pressure in different ways: as heads of department, programme directors and research co-ordinators. In this paper they attempt to answer five research questions: • what patterns of growth/decay have been observed at three institutions of different sizes? • how has the balance between publication and presentation changed? • how has the balance between national and international changed? • how has the balance between conferences and journals changed? • what are the possible reasons for the observed changes?

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  • Where did the b……. go and is it still important?

    Nesbit, T. (2005)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    At the annual conference of the National Advisory Committee on Computing Qualifications (NACCQ) in 2001, it was decided to remove a word that began with “B” from the names of the level 5 and 6 qualifications that are part of the NACCQ family of qualifications. These qualifications were restructured for the 1992-year into an 18-module qualification structure. In the years since then, the number of modules being taught that relate to the same “B” word have reduced in proportion to the total number that are being taught. This paper describes the extent to which the decline in teaching modules related to the “B” word has actually happened; develops a hypothesis as to why this happened; and asks the question as to whether employers of graduates from these qualifications now place less importance on knowledge and skills related to the “B” word.

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  • NESB students - COPing with BICT

    Nesbit, T.; Isitt, S. (2004)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    As increasing numbers of Non English Speaking Background (NESB) students apply to enrol in information and communication technology (ICT) degree programmes in New Zealand, there are many issues that are arising relating to the entry requirements for these students. Many students far exceed the academic entry requirements, and narrowly fail to meet the English language requirements for entry but could well be capable of success, whereas other students who only just meet both the academic and English language requirements may have low rates of success. This paper describes how Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT) introduced a Foundation Programme for NESB students who meet the academic entry requirements for the Bachelor of Information and Communication Technologies (BICT) degree, but narrowly miss the English language entry requirements, in such a way that still allows the students to complete the BICT degree in 3 years. The success rates of the first group of students to complete this foundation programme as they move further into the BICT degree point to this move being a successful one. The results of this research will be of significant use to CPIT and other institutions looking for alternative pathways into their degree programmes for NESB students.

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  • Teaching with a unit testing framework

    Lance, M. (2004)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper analyses element usage in a ‘real world’ XSLT application. A subset of core XSLT elements is identified and the reasons why these particular elements are useful is discussed. Teachers of XSLT may need to modify their introductory examples to cover what is actually needed in larger projects.

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  • The workplace eLearner: Designing and delivering eLearning into the workplace

    Tyler-Smith, K. (2005)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Historically, polytechnics and institutes of technology in New Zealand have had an extensive relationship with industry, business and the public sector employers in terms of placing students into internships, work experience, clinical placements and such like. Polytechnics are also able to secure relevant industry representatives on polytechnic programme advisory boards, for providing guidance with curriculum design and industry guidelines for applied qualifications. However, providing training and education in the workplace represents a very different situation. While polytechnics are seen as good providers of entry level workers that industry, business and the public sector can mould to their own particular culture and needs, in terms of providing training and education in the workplace, polytechnics are seen by some as inflexible, too expensive, unresponsive and not really equipped to develop and deliver programmes that are tailored to the client’s specific needs. Web-based technology enabled learning offers the potential for the New Zealand’s polytechnic sector to address many of the problems they have faced in delivering cost effective training and education into the workplace. It also has the possibility to deal with the perceived weaknesses of traditional methods of workplace-based training and instruction. While computer-based training offers the advantages of self-paced learning and skills training, the real value in a workplace learning environment is the ability to capture and leverage the knowledge, expertise and skills already present in the learners. This paper presents a case study of how a consortium of polytechnics have undertaken two related eLearning projects which deliver a national management qualification to current and aspiring supervisory personnel in the New Zealand public sector.

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  • International students and cooperative industry projects in ICT education: a study of impact factors

    Asgarkhani, M.; Wan, J. (2008)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper elaborates on the outcome of initial stages of a study on factors than can impact (positively or negatively) upon success of international students’ (in this case Chinese) studies overseas - with a focus on projects that require considerable self initiation, self discipline and self learning. Cooperative industry projects were chosen to conduct this study. Phase one involved observing the performance of 16 graduating students and collecting data throughout two semesters. The outcome of this phase (even though not yet final) indicates that despite popular belief (that language and cultural differences are significant barriers to Chinese students’ success), willingness, interest in topic and commitment play a crucial role in success of Chinese students in completing cooperative industry projects.

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  • The capabilities approach and appraising community development programmes in Christchurch

    Schischka, J. (2008)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper summarises the results of a participatory appraisal methodology study carried out with groups of participants in two Christchurch based community development programmes - Sydenham Community Development Project and Manuka Cottage in Addington. Based on the capabilities approach of economist Amartya Sen the methodology extends strategies used in previous studies of participant perspectives in development initiatives in Vanuatu and Samoa. Analysis of the transcripts of the focus groups conducted in these studies reveals significant outcomes from both programmes. Particularly important was the ability of the participatory methodology used to gain the perspectives of a wide range of participants, a number of whom are marginalised from mainstream society. The predominant views among participants in all groups are reported. The prevailing sense of local ownership of both programmes together with the reputation of the community development workers are key motivators in attracting people to the projects and retaining their involvement. Discussion is provided of the limitations and difficulties encountered during the course of the study. A major theme in all of the discussions was that participants had experienced a significant increase in their confidence. Many saw their time in the programmes as very important means in becoming more involved in the community and making new contacts.

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  • Falling into trade:- apprentices' perceptions of becoming a baker

    Chan, S. (2006)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper is a report on the initial data analysis of a larger study on how apprentices become bakers. The overall objective of this study is to explore the apprenticeship journeys of young apprentices learning their trade in the New Zealand baking industry. This interim report is based on interviews with first year apprentices. The apprentices interviewed were all between 17 to 18 years of age. The majority of these apprentices left school in year 11 or 12 (equivalent to Australian years 10 and 11) with minimal National Certificate in Educational Achievement (NCEA) credits. Perhaps surprisingly, none of these apprentices had initial ambitions to become bakers. However, interestingly, they had all undertaken work experience in bakeries while at school. At the time of the interviews, they were well into their first year of working in a bakery. Therefore, this report provides a snapshot view of how these apprentices have settled into the baking life and their progress through the beginning stages of becoming bakers.

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  • The X files - an XML Xperience

    Kennedy, D.; Lance, M. (2001)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    XML – eXtensible Markup Language. A way to markup a document for content. A standard for data interchange that is being used for B2B transactions. XML is designed for use with data-centric documents. Williams et al, 2000 describe a method for mapping a RDBMS structure to an XML DTD. A non-trivial realworld example was selected, that of course outlines. A RDBMS was designed for course outlines and the structure mapped to a DTD. The DTD plus a sample document was initially validated using Internet Explorer. It was further checked using an on-line validator. The DTD was subsequently revised in line with guidelines for good XML.

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  • Serving up server side programming

    Nesbit, T.; Raizis, R. (2004)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper explores what content should be focussed on in the teaching of a level 7 server side programming course (covering PHP) that is part of the Bachelor of Information and Communication Technologies (BICT) and the Graduate Diploma in eCommerce (Grad Dip eCommerce) at Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT). Opinions were sought from members of a variety of PHP user groups about the importance of various topics that could be included in such a course. The project reports of students from both BICT and Grad Dip eCommerce who had completed their major projects using PHP were analysed, to determine which content in the course was the most useful for their projects. The outcome of the research includes some recommendations for increased coverage of some topics in the course under review, and the possibility of changing one of the other courses in the Grad Dip eCommerce from being strongly recommended to being compulsory. The findings of this research will be of use to CPIT and other institutions that are already teaching or are contemplating teaching web-programming courses using PHP at this level.

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  • Encouraging student retention: a study of student retention practices

    McCarthy, C. (2004)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Tinto (2002) asks what would it mean for institutions to take student retention seriously? For CPIT, it took the harsh realities of budgeting EFTS for 2004. We had always seen it as an adult student problem – the students were adults: if they chose to leave it was their business. Now, at budget preparation time, when we saw the retention of our 2003 mid-year intake was 60%, we realised it wasn’t a student problem – it was our problem. We had found what it would mean to take student retention seriously.

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  • Where are they now? Making the transition - three years on

    McCarthy, C. (2004)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    366 Where are they now? Making the Transition - Three Years On. Three years ago, the author presented a paper on a pilot project for senior high school students (McCarthy 2002) that provided a programme for transition to tertiary study in a vocational institution in preparation for a career in information and communications technology. As a result of this project, CPIT believed it had “captured” a potential market of students better prepared to handle the demands of tertiary study. Those students appeared better informed as to their options and more able to make informed choices and it was thought they might prove to be better equipped to survive in tertiary study. The initial project has since initiated a great deal of interest within other Technical Institutes both here in New Zealand and, at least one overseas institution, and has also spawned several successors, including a full-scale ICT-orientated senior high school – unique in New Zealand. This paper re-examines the pilot scheme, and its successors, and follows the relevant tertiary experiences of the students involved in the past three years.

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  • Performance evaluation and capacity planning of corporate networks: a pilot study of methodologies and trends

    Asgarkhani, M.; Ward, B.; Kennedy, D. (2001)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    During the past few years we have witnessed a staggering growth in computer networks. Internet and digital business have had a profound effect on our day-to-day lives. This paper discusses our findings in regards to the challenges that IT departments have had to face - in particular, that of ongoing network performance evaluation and capacity planning. Our findings are the result of a pilot study that was conducted within a number of Christchurch based organisations. Issues such as user involvement, service level agreements, reactive or proactive planning have been addressed, as have tools, techniques and methodologies.

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