18 results for Conference paper, Modify

  • Mathematical modelling of anoestrus in dairy cows and the linkage to nutrition

    Smith, JF; Soboleva, TK; Peterson, AJ; Pleasants, T; Chagas, LM; Burke, CR (2005-01-01)

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    Postpartum anoestrus is a major reproductive problem in New Zealand dairy cows and its duration is related to the nutrition levels both pre and post calving. However, the mechanistic details of this relationship are largely unknown. A better understanding of the interactions between nutritional status, and the levels of the reproductive hormones controlling follicle development and ovulation is needed. A mathematical model consisting of a set of interactive nonlinear differential equations and describing the dynamics of the interactions among luteinising hormone (LH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and oestradiol was developed. The model depicts oestradiol profiles generated by individual follicles from the first follicular wave after calving until ovulation, and changes in LH pulsatility leading to the first pre-ovulatory surge are also produced. The robustness of the model was ascertained from iterative processes, and it was also checked against existing experimental data so as to mimic observed changes in hormone levels. It was shown that two mathematical parameters which control: i) the speed of changes in the feedback of LH activity to oestradiol; and, ii) the sensitivity of the ovarian response to LH, have the greatest effect on duration of anoestrus.

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  • The influence of age and breed of cow on colostrum indicators of suckled beef calves

    Hickson, RE; Back, PJ; Martin, NP; Kenyon, PR; Morris, ST (2016-07-07)

    Conference paper
    Massey University

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  • Reproductive performance of singleton and twin female offspring born to ewe-lamb dams and mature adult dams

    Kenyon, PR

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    false

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  • The use of farm-management tools by New Zealand sheep farmers: changes with time

    Corner-Thomas, RA; Kenyon, PR; Morris, ST; Ridler, AL; Hickson, RE; Greer, AW; Logan, CM; Blair, HT (2016-07-07)

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    The utilisation of farm-management tools by New Zealand sheep farmers can support on-farm decision making, thus facilitating improvements in productivity and profitability of the farming enterprise. There are numerous management tools available to farmers, for example, a recent report identified 127 tools that were available to New Zealand farmers (Allen & Wolfert 2011). Although a large number of tools are accessible to farmers, a survey of sheep farmers conducted in 2012 by Corner-Thomas et al. (2015) identified many that were utilised by only a small percentage of farmers. This indicates that there is the potential for increased uptake of management tools which, if relevant, may lead to benefits in on-farm productivity. The aim of the current study was to determine for sheep farmers in New Zealand, if use of farm-management tools had changed over a two-year period.

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  • Grazing behaviour and species selection of heifer calves fed different forages.

    Back, PJ; Hickson, RE; Lilly, VM; Coleman, LW; Sneddon, NW; Laven, RA

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    The aim of this experiment was to determine whether there was a difference in the behaviour of calves grazing different forages. Weaned dairy heifer calves (n = 64) were assigned to two different forage feeding treatments: ryegrass pasture and a clover-herb mix. Behavioural observations were recorded every 10 minutes over a 72 h period. Behaviours recorded were standing, walking, lying or sitting, grazing, ruminating, drinking/grooming, playing and various combinations of these. Calves grazing pasture spent more time lying and ruminating compared to calves grazing the clover-herb mix (34.6% vs 16.7%), and less time standing and grazing (17.2% vs 32.2%). Calves were less active from late evening and early morning and more likely to be ruminating earlier in the day and grazing later in the day. Plant selection (measured as plant disappearance rate) was determined in calves grazing the clover-herb mix. Red clover had the highest disappearance rate on all days compared to other species (P<0.05).

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  • BRIEF COMMUNICATION: Do different grazing strategies affect pre-weaning calf growth rates?

    Back, PJ; Hickson, RE; van Bouwel, K; de Cock, H; Verdurman, J; Sneddon, NW; Laven, RA

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    false

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  • Days to calving and intercalving interval in beef and dairy-beef crossbred cows

    Morris, ST; Hickson, RE; Martin, NP; Kenyon, PR

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    One important attribute of a beef-breeding cow is the ability to wean a calf every year. Furthermore, an earlierborn calf is likely to be heavier at weaning and its dam has more opportunity to conceive again during the following breeding season. In a spring-calving system under the seasonal pastoral-grazing system in New Zealand, a 365- day intercalving interval is desirable. A normal gestation length is 280 days leaving 85 days for a cow to resume oestrous cycles and conceive again to maintain the 365- day calving interval. Literature estimates of the interval between calving and the first oestrous cycle post-calving are 53-82 days for mixed-aged beef-breeding cows and 81-95 days for first-lactation beef-breeding cows (Hickson et al. 2012; Knight & Nicoll 1978; Morris et al. 1978; Smeaton et al. 1986), indicating that a 365-day calving interval is difficult to maintain. An alternative reproductive performance measure to intercalving interval, and favoured in naturally mated beefcow herds, is days to calving, that is defined as the number of days from the start of joining to the day of calving. Days to calving has become the standard fertility trait for genetic evaluation (Meyer et al. 1990; 1991; Johnston & Bunter 1996). A study was conducted to investigate the effects of breed group, year of calving and conception cycle on intercalving intervals and days to calving in straight-bred Angus and Angus-cross-Friesian, Angus-cross-Jersey and Angus-cross-Kiwicross cows from first mating as heifers through to their sixth calving.

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  • Translation : Proceedings of the Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand 2014

    Schnoor, Christoph (2014-08-07)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    The 31st conference of the Society of Architectural Historians Australia and New Zealand (SAHANZ) has taken ‘Translation’ as its theme. The call for papers invited the contributors to explore translation, understood as the conscious transfer of ideas or buildings from one context into another. As a term in the wider sense, translation acknowledges the fact that the translator is aware of the necessary changes the idea has to undergo in order to be meaningful ‘on the other side’ of the process. Thus, it is not simply a mechanical act of transferring an idea into a new realm but a creative act. Translations may therefore result in new creations, via conscious adaptation, via misunderstandings or misappropriations. But distortion, misunderstanding, … - they can all result in new inventions: if wilful or not, they are part of translations. Papers in this conference have taken up the theme in a multitude of ways. The investigations range from linguistic questions of translation to the problems of physical dislocation of architecture and its shifting context. Papers explore cultural questions, related to the Indigenous in Australia and Maori in New Zealand; and related to colonialism and to shifts in political paradigms. They formulate the clashes between architectural establishment and younger generations of architects ; they explore the manifold issues that occurred in the spread of the Modern Movement, in that architects themselves moved – emigrated – and took notions of architecture with them, or in that the new ideas were disseminated by ways of education and symposia. Approaches, theories and techniques have been explored, as in the translation from drawing to building.

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  • Diffusing Diffusion: A History of the Technological Advanced in Spatial Performance

    Johnson, BD; Norris, M; Kapur, A

    Conference paper
    Massey University

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  • tactile.motion: An iPad Based Performance Interface For Increased Expressivity In Diffusion Performance

    Johnson, BD; Norris, M; Kapur, A

    Conference paper
    Massey University

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  • speaker.motion: A Mechatronic Loudspeaker System For Live Spatialisation

    Johnson, BD; Kapur, A; Norris, M

    Conference paper
    Massey University

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  • Intrepid traveller: the University of Auckland Library on the e-book journey

    Mincic-Obradovic, Ksenija (2006)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    E-books continue to thrive with e-book technology companies developing a variety of solutions for libraries, many of which offer excellent support for teaching and learning. The objective of this paper is to present the University of Auckland Library’s experiences in integrating e-books into the learning environment. This is a complex issue and will be considered from different perspectives: selection, purchasing, providing access, cataloguing, and user support and satisfaction.

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  • Talking Dirty

    McMeel, Dermott; Coyne, Richard; Lee, John (2005)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    We analyse the emergence and use of formal and informal communication tools in group working to aid in understanding the complexity of construction projects. Our test case is the design and build of an interactive digital installation in an exhibition space, involving students. After the project we conducted focus group studies to elicit insights into the effective use of the digital communications available for the project. We recount key insights from the study and examine how digital messaging devices are contributing to or hindering creative discussion. Whereas the construction process is concerned with the removal of dirt and re-ordering, in this paper we reflect on construction’s ritualistic, contractual and unauthorized aspects, and dirt’s role within them. We draw on Bakhtin’s theories of the carnival in exploring ritual, and the mixing of the un-sanctioned (rumour) with the official (contractual). How does dirt impinge on issues of communication, open discussion, and the move towards “partnering” in construction practice? We conjecture that while physical dirt might be unpleasant, the removal of other forms of metaphorical dirt hampers construction as an efficient and creative process.

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  • Carnival and Construction – Towards a Scaffolding for the Inclusion of ICT in the Construction Process

    McMeel, Dermott (2006)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. In this paper we explore the process of construction, we consider the construc- tion site as a mediated collaborative environment in which many specialist crafts and esoteric skills are present and negotiated. Concrete information when pass onto a construction site becomes part of a fluid morphing object, the validity and meaning of information can change—or be lost—depending on where and when it is. We look at current models of construction and actual construction process and we explore the notion of Carnival as a tool to reconcile the concrete and fluid aspects to communication dynamics of mediated group working in general and of construction site practice specifically.

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  • Dirty Work

    McMeel, Dermott; Coyne, Richard (2005)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    Conference Details: Proc. W1 18th British HCI Group Annual Conference 6-10 September – Designer, User, Meaning Maker: Rethinking Relationships for a More Creative HCI. pp. 26-29. Leeds: Leeds Metropolitan University. This research explores the potency of dirt as a category for understanding digital communications. Our eventual target domain is communication in the construction industry, which is characterised by contractual formalities on the one hand (working documents, specifications, forms), and informal communications on the other (onsite instructions, scribbles on paper). Electronic communications (such as email and message boards) represent hybrid formal-informal media in the increasingly litigious workplace. On the way to understanding the untidiness of the construction site, we analysed the use of formal and informal communications in group working by students in the design and construction of an interactive digital art installation. Our research so far draws on the interesting relationship between dirt, authority, and human-computer interaction.

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  • E-books - essentials or extras? The University of Auckland Library experience

    Mincic-Obradovic, Ksenija (2004)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    The e-publishing industry is developing rapidly, providing new opportunities for libraries, but creating new challenges as well. Questions on how best to integrate e-books into the learning environment are pressing. In 2003, the University of Auckland Library provided access to nearly 80,000 e-books through the library catalogue only. This paper will explore some of the theoretical and practical issues of implementing e-books in the University of Auckland Library, covering such issues as: - Integration - Workflow - Differences in perception/acceptance of digital texts - Response from students and staff - User preferences and reasons for these

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  • I didn’t know what I didn’t know – Postgraduate science students as new library users

    White, BD; Rainier, BA

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    While considerable effort goes into equipping undergraduate students in science, technology, engineering and medicine with knowledge discovery skills and an understanding of the scientific literature, many of them complete their first degrees with a relatively basic level of competence. Undergraduate science education demands an intensive development of subject knowledge and technical skills with less emphasis on the primary literature, and unless an information literacy element is expressly built into science programmes undergraduate students are not routinely required to make use of library resources (Bogucka & Wood, 2009; Wiegant, Scager, & Boonstra, 2011). Postgraduate study, particularly at masters and doctoral level, places quite a different level of demand on students, and even to formulate a research question requires an extensive knowledge of the existing literature. The first part of the thesis journey is the literature review which provides a theoretical and methodological grounding of the whole project, but students often arrive at postgraduate study poorly equipped to perform this task (Hoffmann, Antwi-Nsiah, Feng, & Stanley, 2008; Miller, 2014). Those skills that they have acquired tend to be based around Google and Google Scholar (Wu & Chen, 2014) which provide a good result for relatively little effort, but which lack the functionality to fully support a literature review at this level (Johnson & Simonsen, 2015). Increasing internationalisation of postgraduate education is another factor impacting on this situation, although it would be wrong to assume that English-speaking students or those from “developed countries” possess the appropriate skills for an advanced degree literature review.

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  • Can we improve participation in university course surveys using mobile tools? : a practical experiment

    Parsons, D.; Rees, M. (2017-05-10T05:37:14Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Student course surveys provide an important feedback mechanism for universities. However the quality of this feedback depends largely on the level of participation. New technologies have enabled course surveys to evolve from written paper-based tools to web-based and mobile channels, but using these channels does not necessarily lead to better response rates. This paper discusses the results of a survey designed and administered at Massey University, New Zealand, to gain insights into students’ attitudes towards course surveys and factors that might impact on their participation. The survey also explored the potential interest in mobile channels for providing course feedback. The responses to this survey informed a pilot study that tested a mobile course survey tool. The results of our experiment suggest that, whilst a mobile channel may lead to improved participation, more significant results would depend on its integration into a broader set of strategies and tools for student engagement.

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