95 results for Conference paper, 2007

  • Mixed age settings: What happens for young children.

    Fagan, T. J. (2007)

    Conference paper
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Everything in moderation: processes and practices in teacher education.

    Broadley, Mary-Liz; Hill, D. (2007)

    Conference paper
    Open Polytechnic

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  • A review of Triple Helix linkages in New Zealand earthquake engineering networks and comparison with the Australian Cooperative Research Centre model.

    Butcher, P. J.; Thorpe, D. (2007)

    Conference paper
    Open Polytechnic

    This paper addresses factors that influence the relationships between industry, government and academia in New Zealand in terms of the earthquake engineering industry and identifies strengths and weaknesses of the model in comparison with Cooperative Research Centres (CRC) in Australia and discusses: � How are value conflicts from university-industry-government interactions addressed and resolved? � How does the Australian CRC model operate and what parallels and differences exist between that model and the New Zealand situation? � What can be learnt from the CRC model that can be applied to the New Zealand situation? A case study approach is used to evaluate triple helix elements and identifies key attributes which support or otherwise, effective operation and economic performance in the two sectors.

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  • Strategic management of aquifers subject to salinity intrusion.

    De Costa, G. S.; Datta, B.; Porter, M.; Kojiri, T.; Hamaguchi, T. (2007)

    Conference paper
    Open Polytechnic

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  • A state responsibility to provide some free tertiary education for adults?

    Scholes, V. (2007)

    Conference paper
    Open Polytechnic

    One way of responding to the question of whether we should give some people access to free tertiary education is to start from a consideration of people�s rights. In the interests of bringing another perspective to bear on this question, we could approach it from the starting point of the State�s responsibilities. This paper addresses the following question: does the State�s general responsibility to provide education to support societal needs extend to providing any free education opportunities for adults? I start from the assumption that a democratic State has a responsibility for managing and encouraging the democracy of the society; the security of the society; the physical welfare of the society; and the cultural riches of the society. I suggest this assumption supports a claim of the State�s responsibilities to provide certain free education opportunities for children, then consider whether it suggests a responsibility to provide any free tertiary education opportunities for adults. I will argue that it does for some types of opportunities, including education for political awareness, and offer an example to indicate how the State could do this.

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  • Mentoring: Finding and benefiting from the best mentoring method for you or your organisation

    Fields, A. J. (2007)

    Conference paper
    Open Polytechnic

    Is mentoring right for you? There are many different mentoring methods and systems for mentoring; some used in the library profession, others used elsewhere. This presentation considers three key questions: What are the benefits from being in a mentoring relationship or system, What kinds of mentoring methods and systems are there, and Which one is the right one for you or your organisation? There are benefits to be gained from being mentored, and also from being a mentor. The benefits may focus on your current work, your longer-term career, your general growth and development in the profession or in leadership roles, or wider life beyond work. There is a wide range of mentoring methods and systems currently used in library, information and other professions: some will suit various stages of career, others for various types of personalities, and various working situations. There are mentoring methods and systems applicable for those in both large and small organisations, for those in cities and rural areas, for those beginning their working life and those who are well established in the profession. Working out which mentoring method or system will be the best one for you will depend on what your needs are, what you want to achieve, and your individual circumstances and career path. Organisational needs are also catered for with some mentoring systems. A range of formal and informal mentoring methods and systems are described, and examples of successful methods and systems are given.

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  • Behaviour analysis around the world: New Zealand.

    Harper, D. N.; Peters, H. L. (2007)

    Conference paper
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Screening first year students for readiness to study psychology.

    Bathurst, J.; Jarden, A.; Weaver, N. E. (2007)

    Conference paper
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Is an online internet discussion forum on rumour in the military a place for popular military political dissent?

    Brown, M. (2007)

    Conference paper
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Law and temporality as expressed in the transition between colonial and postcolonial New Zealand.

    Strongman, L. (2007)

    Conference paper
    Open Polytechnic

    This paper intends to trace the perception of time as expressed in law making concerning The Treaty of Waitangi and related legislature in New Zealand from its colonial conception to the present day in the era of globalisation. I argue that the influence of modernity has seen an accelerated conception of constitutional lawmaking which signifies in New Zealand the adoption of the indigenous into the same temporal framework as the coloniser at the same time as it re-inscribes political domination in terms of space.

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  • Towards self-sustainability in education.

    Natanasabapathy, P. (2007)

    Conference paper
    Open Polytechnic

    Education is an empowering method of causing change. It plays a significant role in personal human development by developing the learning capacity of individuals. However, personal development tends to be perceived as a separate discipline on its own. This paper points out that education is actually for personal development. It argues that knowledge associated with personal development such as wisdom related knowledge should be embedded in courses more actively to draw desired behavioural patterns for self-sustainability and survival in this rapidly changing world. Self-sustainability is addressed from a behavioural perspective where desirable behavioural patterns that allow individuals to be retained or sustained for longer periods are considered sustainable qualities. Research is overwhelmingly in support of new ideals for workers to achieve long term sustainability in order to face the challenges in the 21st century. Emerging trends are explored and the development towards self-sustainability is discussed.

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  • Bracken (Pteridium esculentum) as a food source for pre-contact Maori in New Zealand.

    Burtenshaw, M. K. (2007)

    Conference paper
    Open Polytechnic

    The pre-historic environment provided an abundant supply of protein from fish, shellfish and game for New Zealand Maori. Maori were skilled agriculturists and produced good crops of kumara (sweet potato). However, seasonal carbohydrate shortages particularly during the summer season before kumara crops were harvested lead to the gathering and processing of bracken fern rhizomes as a carbohydrate food source. Bracken is now known to contain the toxic carcinogen, ptaquilaoside. This paper investigates yield for effort, seasonal variation in carbohydrate yields of bracken rhizomes to determine any seasonal variation in toxicity levels and to ascertain the effects of processing rhizomes.

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  • Education in an electronic era: interwoven opportunities and issues relating to new learning communities.

    Hornblow, D. (2007)

    Conference paper
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Students as clients: A client-centred approach to distance learning.

    Weaver, N. E.; Peters, H. L. (2007)

    Conference paper
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Open educational resources NZ project.

    Dark, S.; Wyles, R. (2007)

    Conference paper
    Open Polytechnic

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  • The missing universities: Absent critics and consciences of society.

    Hornblow, D. (2007)

    Conference paper
    Open Polytechnic

    With few exceptions, universities have become ineffective in their role as critics and conscience of society. Support for this contention is provided in this paper by addressing the questions: What is the evidence that universities are failing to act as critics and conscience of society? In what ways should universities continue to be the critics and conscience of society? Exemplars and examples of what has been, what is, and what might be are provided. It is posited that as a good critic, a university as a community of learners and leaders should identify and challenge assumptions, be aware of context, seek alternative ways of interpreting situations, remain sceptical about what is seen and heard, and pronounce judgement as appropriate. As a conscience, the university should take into account and articulate the moral quality of the actions and motives of both itself and society, approving the right and condemning the wrong. Also, it is argued that it is essential to have an underpinning philosophy. This could be, for example, social constructivism. Without a philosophy, there can be no conscience. Without a conscience, criticality is of little worth. From a logical perspective it is possible for an institution to be neither critic nor conscience, critic but not conscience, conscience but not critic, or critic and conscience. The point is made that the first two of the four options are unacceptable for a university; the last two apply according to the circumstances.

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  • Using digital storytelling and video to build a virtual world of e-learning.

    Fowler, P. (2007)

    Conference paper
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Wrestling with metadata.

    Brown, C.; Thomas, B. (2007)

    Conference paper
    Open Polytechnic

    The objective of the OER (Open Educational Resources) project is to develop courseware that will be freely available to all tertiary education institutions in New Zealand. We were faced with the challenge of developing a model for future online open-source education projects. We needed to develop a metadata profile in order to package the learning materials so that they were searchable, and we wanted to be sure that the process we developed was easy to use by a range of people. The presentation will: Share ideas about metadata application profiles, models and pitfalls. Give attendees an understanding of the process we used to develop the application profile. Look at the technical process undertaken in packaging a learning object with metadata attached. Discuss and develop a shared understanding of interoperable metadata application profiles. Involve wrestling metaphors and catch cries. Finally, we compare the OER metadata application profile with that of other developments in Aotearoa New Zealand and discuss suggestions for moving towards greater interoperability.

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  • The New Education Fellowship Conference, 1937.

    Adams, P. (2007)

    Conference paper
    Open Polytechnic

    Discusses the New Education Fellowship Conference, held 1937. It was organized by NZCER and was NZ's largest educational event with thousands of public and teachers attending sessions in Auckland, Wellington, Christchurch and Dunedin.

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  • Education in an electronic era: richness, reach and the emergence of new learning communities.

    Hornblow, D. (2007)

    Conference paper
    Open Polytechnic

    The electronic era provides opportunities in education for 'richness' (that is, the overall quality of information) and 'reach' (the overall number of people involved in the exchange of information)' in contrast to 'richness or reach'. Gone is the need for learning exclusively within the classroom that is based on simulated exercises and contrived case studies. Through electronic and other means, the thrust of further and higher education can be on real-life projects in the real world. This 'bricks and clicks' approach enables learners to make meaningful contributions to work - and life in general - while earning academic credit. Examples of how this is happening - for example, through special projects, internships, and e-portfolio development - are provided. The emergence of new learning communities, with associated opportunities and challenges, is highlighted. Importantly, how the members of such communities can participate willingly and enthusiastically is considered. The consequential need for new models of education is explored.

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