1,298 results for Conference paper

  • 65 THz beat frequency observed from a scalar modulation instability experiment

    Kruhlak, Robert; Wong, Gordon; Clark, Heather; Leonhardt, Rainer; Harvey, John; Knight, J C; Wadsworth, W J; Russell, P St. J (2005)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. We have observed an optical modulation with a period of about 15 fs by beating the anti-stokes wave and the pump wave exiting a photonic crystal fibre. These results confirm the coherence of the sidebands generated by scalar modulation instability in the normal dispersion regime. Future experiments will be conducted to measure the beating of the stokes and the anti-stokes waves.

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  • A Java reuse repository for Eclipse using LSI

    Lin, Min Yang (Jerry); Amor, Robert; Tempero, Ewan (2006)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. Software reuse is a concept that is frequently mentioned as a way to improve software developers' productivity. However, there are a number of issues that need to be addressed in order for software reuse to be adopted by developers. One of those issues is providing enough reusable artifacts. The Java Standard API has been quite successful in this, with the latest version having over 3000 classes available. However this raises the issue of finding the right artifact to reuse. With the Java API, this means trawling through the JavaDoc Web pages, which has the risk of not being able to find the right artifact, even though it is in the API. In this paper, we explore the use of latent semantic indexing as a means to index the Java API JavaDoc pages. Specifically, we describe Prophecy, an Eclipse plug-in that presents the Java API as a software repository.

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  • Design and Development of Medical Simulations in Second Life and OpenSim

    Diener, Scott; Windsor, John; Bodily, David (2009)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    EDUCAUSE Australasia 2009, Perth Western Australia. 3‐6 May 2009 http://www.caudit.edu.au/educauseaustralasia09/. Let’s be honest, our physical classrooms haven’t changed a lot over the years as a result of technology. In fact, technology has actually interrupted some of the powerful interactive dynamics that have historically been a part of good teaching - wandering around the classroom interacting with students, looking directly into eyeballs! PowerPoint education has tied teachers to a menudriven podium, and ever-increasing class sizes have cast students into even larger ’seating batteries’ where they can be fed. But we can do better. In her book, Designing Learning Spaces, Diana Oblinger provides a wonderfully clear view of what we could accomplish: The key, therefore, is to provide a physical space that supports multidisciplinary, team-taught, highly interactive learning unbound by traditional time constraints within a social setting that engages students and faculty and enables rich learning experiences. However, what if we use virtual space rather than physical space? Can we apply the same concepts? These are early days, but we are becoming convinced that we can. It is now possible to construct unique and detailed virtual environments that rival real physical teaching spaces, and in some cases to even surpass that which is possible in reality. We can construct learning spaces that are unbound by physical and geographical constraints, presenting to students experiences that would be too dangerous or unacceptable in reality. In virtual learning spaces we can stand inside an active volcano, experience and respond to natural disasters, or practice laparoscopic surgery on simulated patients. Our only limits seem to be those of imagination. This paper presents the current work of the Academic and Collaborative Technologies group at the University of Auckland. The paper describes the conceptual design and construction details of the University’s Second Life simulation island, Medical Centre and Emergency Room simulations. The paper also discusses the University’s involvement in the development of a National Virtual World Grid based upon the OpenSim platform (a collaboration between Otago University, Canterbury University, The University of Auckland, and Telecom New Zealand).

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  • Using a Visual Wiki for IT Knowledge Management

    Chaffe, Tim (2009)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    EDUCAUSE Australasia 2009, Perth Western Australia. 3‐6 May 2009 http://www.caudit.edu.au/educauseaustralasia09/. The catch cry of John Zachman when talking about Enterprise Architecture is ‘Document, document, document, document.... {for as many times as possible until a deep breath and then) Document, document, document, document and document again’. This rallying cry fills a tertiary sector Enterprise Architect with foreboding daunted by the sheer amount of organisational information needed to constitute even a partially populated six by six dimension Zachman Framework. Forming and sustaining Enterprise Architecture (EA) is possible if authoring is distributed across an organisation. However existing EA diagramming and repository tools are aimed at EA practitioners and are not user or cost friendly for the general user populace. Treating EA as a form of IT Knowledge Management and using the Confluence Wiki has improved the capture of IT information within The University of Auckland. However as the volume of information has mounted, the ability to navigate and sustain the knowledgebase has decreased, and the demand for ‘simple diagrams showing everything’ was not satisfied by Gliffy plugins. Working closely with the Computer Science department of The University of Auckland, we have prototyped alternate ways of capturing IT information that allows visual navigation combined with the agility of Wiki’s aka ’The Visual Wiki’.

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  • EPROM cell with a magnesium electronic injector

    Kong, Sik On; Kwok, Chee Yee; Wong, Sai Peng (1995)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. By using Mg as the tunnelling electrode for an EPROM cell, it is shown in a control experiment that the tunnelling current is much enhanced while the tunnelling field is much reduced after a sintering procedure in which Mg reacts with the SiO2 dielectric. Potentially, this may lead to faster programming, lower programming voltages and better programming endurance. An experimental EPROM cell has been made and has demonstrated programmability

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  • Non-linearity measure of a problem's crossover suitability

    Mason, Andrew (1995)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. For any problem with an unknown fitness function, justification of an evolutionary algorithm as a research method necessarily relies upon conjectures about that fitness function. This paper formulates apparent crossover partition coefficients (a generalisation of Walsh transforms) and uses these to develop a new model of crossover non-linearity ratios. Experimental runs demonstrate that this theory can offer insights into the apparent tractability of problems under crossover

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  • Performance of a speech-data PRMA system in an in-building environment

    Orange, M.D.; Sowerby, K.W.; Coulson, A.J.; Butterworth, K.S. (1997)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. The performance of an in-building speech-data PRMA system employing frequency reuse is determined via computer simulation. Propagation measurements (at 1.8 GHz) made in the building in which the PRMA system is assumed to operate, are included in the analysis. Significant variations in performance are found to exist over the coverage area. Optimum system performance is obtained by allocating the entire bandwidth to each floor (i.e., complete frequency reuse) and re-transmitting any packets that are corrupted by cochannel interference. This significant result suggests that packet access schemes such as PRMA can provide an alternative to TDMA and CDMA based future wireless networks

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  • Distributed transaction management scheme for multidatabase systems

    Ye, Xinfeng; Keane, John A. (1995)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. Transaction management in a multidatabase system must ensure global serializability. Local serializable execution is, by itself, not sufficient to ensure global serializability, since local serialization orders of subtransactions of global transactions must be the same in all systems. In this paper, a distributed transaction management scheme is introduced. The scheme maintains the autonomy of the local database systems. It is free from global deadlock and guarantees fairness in the execution of the transactions in the system

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  • Embedding Information Literacy Online

    Gunn, Cathy; Hearne, Shari (2009)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. The University of Auckland aims to provide its graduates with general intellectual skills, capacities and attributes, as well as discipline-based knowledge. The University’s Information Literacy Policy ensures that information literacy (IL) resources are used as effectively as possible in teaching and learning activities, for example, through the University Library’s IL programme. This programme offers a flexible e-learning approach that includes the use of interactive, self-paced online tutorials, which can be tailored for specific subjects, courses and assignments. The large numbers of students enrolled in Business School courses can sometimes preclude face-to-face instruction in business information literacy skills. There are also international students from diverse backgrounds with English as an additional language (EAL) and mature students returning to graduate study who require reiterative high quality information literacy instruction. The Library, in collaboration with the Centre for Academic Development and Business School academics, agreed to develop a suite of self-paced information literacy tutorials to service these varied demands. Development of interactive online tutorials is a common strategy in universities seeking to reconcile the challenge of scale with principles of learner-centred instruction. The literature reveals many advantages, both educational and practical. In this case, the aim is to design a range of online activities that: * Can be customised and incorporated into the curriculum for specific assignments * Align with terms of the University’s Academic Plan and Graduate Profiles * Are flexible, portable and user-focused * Use a range of video, audio, graphics and interactive web-based technologies within learning designs to motivate and engage students from a range of educational backgrounds and age-groups. Development of this type of e-learning resource is typically a collaborative effort involving subject matter experts, multimedia and web developers and learning designers. The initial concept for online Information Literacy modules was presented to the University’s eLearning Design and Development Group in the form of a project proposal by a team of Business Librarians. As discussions and conceptual development progressed, existing online information literacy (OIL) skills modules developed by a TEC-funded collaboration between the University of Otago, Dunedin College of Education and the Otago Polytechnic were considered as a possible reusable resource. While the content and reusability aspects of these modules rated highly, practical considerations of hosting and integration with local systems pointed to a local solution. A web-based Course Builder tool already in common use by the eLearning team would provide a suitable and easy to use in-house development and hosting environment. The open access / open source nature of the OIL modules meant parts of them could be repurposed for inclusion in locally developed and hosted activities, giving teaching staff greater control of content and use. Consultation with a key member of the OIL development team lent considerable expertise and background information to the local initiative. At the time of writing, the modules are still under development. This paper describes development of the innovative design concept, its grounding in current literature on teaching of generic skills and e-learning design, and the three-way collaboration involved in its implementation.

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  • Fault tolerant model for a functional language parallel machine

    Ye, Xinfeng; Keane, John A. (1995)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. The paper describes a fault tolerant model for a functional language parallel machine. The model is transparent to the user and ensures successful execution of programs in the presence of hardware failure. The model is based on data replication. It takes advantage of the properties of the functional languages. The recovery scheme can be carried out simultaneously on all processors and occurs while “normal” program execution is in progress. Thus normal execution suffers less performance degradation than with other approaches

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  • ION architecture for robot learning

    Qualtrough, Paul (1995)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. It is claimed that one of the main reasons why the development of intelligent robots has been slower than expected is that machine learning has been seen as an “add on” feature-one to be placed in the higher and later-developed levels of robot architectures. A case is made for incorporating machine learning at the earliest possible stage, and relying on it as the primary method of developing robot controllers. An architecture is proposed to support this approach

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  • On the investigation of radiowave propagation mechanisms for future wireless communications services planning

    Neve, M.J.; Rowe, Gerard B.; Sowerby, Kevin W.; Williamson, Allan G. (1996)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. The global move towards mobile wireless communications is necessitating the development of efficient spectrum utilisation strategies. Effective spectrum sharing is a key issue, and requires an understanding of the mechanisms by which radiowaves propagate in real environments. A research project on radiowave propagation modelling for future wireless communications services being undertaken within the Radio Systems Group at The University of Auckland, New Zealand is described. A programme of experimental measurements of scaled building models (at appropriately scaled frequencies) is being performed to gain insight into the mechanisms by which radiowaves propagate in real environments. Several results are presented to illustrate the use of the technique

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  • Effect of receiver capture and cochannel interference on PRMA

    Orange, M.D.; Sowerby, K.W. (1996)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. The performance of a speech-only cellular PRMA system is analysed in an interference limited Rayleigh faded environment. The inter-cell interference present in such a system can significantly increase the probability of packet loss as well as reduce the overall system utilisation. In this paper an ideal 2-branch signal/interference ratio selection diversity scheme has been shown to be effective in combating the level of inter-cell interference. A cellular PRMA system with a cluster size of 4 was found to be the most efficient, in terms of system utilisation and number of users per cell able to be supported

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  • Recovery effect in cellular radio systems

    Carter, L.J.; Maclean, T.S.M. (1990)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. A novel expression for the attenuation of a radio wave propagating over a mixed land-sea path successfully predicts the recovery of field strength over the sea path. An initial series of measurements has been made in the Auckland area to determine whether the recovery effect is a significant factor at cellular radio frequencies. The results presented are limited by the fact that they were taken in a real environment, rather than in controlled laboratory conditions. It is therefore difficult to eliminate unwanted variables, particularly the effects of clutter. Nevertheless, the results do show consistently that signal enhancement occurs over a sea-water path at cellular radio frequencies

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  • Feasibility of spectrum sharing between DS-CDMA mobile radio systems and microwave point-to-point links

    Marshall, P.J.; Sowerby, K.W.; Shafi, M. (1996)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. Radio spectrum allocated for many second and third generation mobile radio systems in the 1-3 GHz frequency bands (e.g. USA PCS, DCS1800 and FPLMTS) is currently used in many countries for fixed point-to-point microwave links. General techniques are presented to investigate the feasibility of spectrum sharing between an indoor DS-CDMA mobile radio system with vertical frequency reuse and a fixed point-to-point microwave link. Using a range of system parameters, the limitations of spectrum sharing are estimated. The results indicate that, for the systems considered, spectrum sharing will be difficult to implement without sufficient geographical isolation between the two systems. It is also apparent that the feasibility of spectrum sharing depends largely on the propagation characteristics between the two systems. The feasibility of spectrum sharing depends on the mutual and self-interference that will be received in the fixed and mobile systems. General techniques for characterising this interference and determining the feasibility of spectrum sharing are outlined

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  • Adaptive fuzzy control

    Li, Han-Xiong (1996)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. In this paper, adaptive fuzzy logic control (FLC) will be designed by using a simple reference model. This design approach is based on our new methodology “design rule base qualitatively and data base quantitatively”. If the linear rule base is used, the model of FLC can be obtained. It is actually a nonlinear function with only three scaling gains need to be designed and tuned. The conventional control theory can thus be used. This model reference adaptive fuzzy control (MRAFC) requires less restriction on the reference model, but often achieves a more robust performance than its classical counterpart

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  • Public-sector vs. private-sector R&D in India: a comparative analysis of two R&D teams

    Sankaran, Jayaram K.; Suchitra, Mouly V. (1996)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. The subject of this paper is a comparative analysis of two Indian R&D teams with similar objectives and activities. The team which we first studied (team A) was located in a public-sector electrical power research institute. The second team (team B) was the R&D unit of a private-sector company which manufactures and sells electrical equipment such as motors, generators, and transformers. Using qualitative methodology, we developed a process model of the ineffectiveness of team A. This model served as an interpretive framework with which to study team B and compare it with team A

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  • Efficient word-graph parsing and search with a stochastic context-free grammar

    Waters, C.J.; MacDonald, B.A. (1997)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. Personal use of this material is permitted. However, permission to reprint/republish this material for advertising or promotional purposes or for creating new collective works for resale or redistribution to servers or lists, or to reuse any copyrighted component of this work in other works must be obtained from the IEEE. Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher.

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  • Multicast primitive for mobile hosts

    Ye, Xinfeng; Keane, John A. (1996)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. Due to network latency and the mobility of the host, many existing group communication protocols are limited to a static environment. This paper presents a multicast primitive for delivering multicast messages to mobile hosts. The primitive has the total ordering property which guarantees the ordering of message delivery. The protocol also guaranteed that the messages are delivered to the mobile hosts exactly once. Sequence numbers and message buffers are used to cope with message duplication and message loss

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  • Implications of propagation modeling on the design of a DS-CDMA in-building mobile communication system

    Butterworth, K.S.; Sowerby, K.W.; Williamson, A.G. (1997)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. This paper investigates the implications of propagation modeling on the design of a DS-CDMA in-building mobile communication system. Two modeling approaches are considered, namely a floor-averaged propagation model and a localised area model that considers individual propagation paths for a range of potential mobile user locations. Results (measured at 1.8 GHz) show that overall system performance estimates are heavily dependent on the model used to describe the building's propagation characteristics and suggest that the former approach leads to a rather pessimistic prediction of system performance when compared with the later. This suggests that unnecessarily conservative design would be likely if the former approach was utilised as part of a system planning process

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