1,299 results for Conference paper

  • Talking Dirty

    McMeel, Dermott; Coyne, Richard; Lee, John (2005)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    We analyse the emergence and use of formal and informal communication tools in group working to aid in understanding the complexity of construction projects. Our test case is the design and build of an interactive digital installation in an exhibition space, involving students. After the project we conducted focus group studies to elicit insights into the effective use of the digital communications available for the project. We recount key insights from the study and examine how digital messaging devices are contributing to or hindering creative discussion. Whereas the construction process is concerned with the removal of dirt and re-ordering, in this paper we reflect on construction’s ritualistic, contractual and unauthorized aspects, and dirt’s role within them. We draw on Bakhtin’s theories of the carnival in exploring ritual, and the mixing of the un-sanctioned (rumour) with the official (contractual). How does dirt impinge on issues of communication, open discussion, and the move towards “partnering” in construction practice? We conjecture that while physical dirt might be unpleasant, the removal of other forms of metaphorical dirt hampers construction as an efficient and creative process.

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  • Habermasian Inquiring System: Toward a General Framework for Knowledge Management Research

    Zining, Guo; Sheffield, Jim (2006)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    This study addresses a long-standing and well-recognized problem in KM research, namely the lack of conceptual integration and a cumulative tradition. Knowledge management needs an overarching framework to unify and direct research. This paper reports on the development of such a framework. Elements of the proposed framework are created by synthesizing concepts from the systems thinking and critical thinking traditions. It is argued that the synthesis of aspects of Churchman's inquiring systems and Habermas' critical social theory provides a philosophically grounded, universally pragmatic framework useful in managing the complexity, and conceptualizing the richness, of knowledge phenomena. The key architectural element in this framework is Habermas' knowledge interests. Habermas' three knowledge interests (technical, practical and emancipatory) form a three-level integrating structure. Framework development consists of describing how four other design elements (Habermas' three rationalities, Churchman's roles, knowledge dynamics, and research paradigms) are positioned within this integrating structure.

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  • Architecture and implementation of an agent-based simulation tool for market-based pricing in Next-Generation Wireless Networks

    Roggendorf, Matthias; Beltran, Fernando; Gutierrez, Jairo (2006)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. We present a generic, agent-based simulation environment for dynamic pricing in next-generation wireless networks. While a lot of effort has been put into simulation platforms for recreating the behaviour of IP-based traffic in fixed and wireless networks, no standard platform for simulating different pricing schemes in such networks has yet emerged. Our work is driven by the vision of a ubiquitous wireless network environment, in which users can dynamically request network resources for various use from different, potentially competing network providers. For such a scenario, new pricing approaches are needed to charge the user according to dynamic factors such as current congestion levels or the the number of customers present at a specific location. The developed simulation environment serves as a generic tool for implementing and testing different pricing approaches.

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  • Modeling blood flow in the gastrointesinal system

    Mabotuwana, Thusitha; Pullan, A J; Smith, N P; Cheng, Leo K (2006)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    Compared to cardiac ischemia, relatively little is known about ischemia that develops within the gastrointestinal system. The work presented here is a first step towards developing a detailed anatomically and biophysically based model of the mesenteric arterial system of the human intestine to be used to simulate normal and compromised blood flows. Data from the Visible Human project were used to develop an initial model of the mesenteric arterial tree. Using this tree, equations that govern blood flow within extensible vessels were set up and solved for pressure, radius and velocity. Results were analyzed for the four distinct phases of cardiac contraction - diastole, isovolumic contraction, ejection and isovolumic relaxation and the profiles showing the temporally varying pressure and velocity within the network for a periodic input varying between 10.29 kPa (77 mmHg) and 14.63 kPa (110 mmHg) at the abdominal aorta are presented in this paper.

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  • The maternal, fetal and postnatal somatotrophic axes in intrauterine growth retardation.

    Oliver, MH; Bloomfield, FH; Harding, JE; Breier, BH; Bassett, NS; Gluckman, PD (1999)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    Both the maternal and fetal somatotrophic axes are closely linked to fetal substrate supply. Nutritional insults at critical stages of fetal development may lead to permanent reprogramming of the relationships between these factors. The consequences of reprogramming during fetal life may be harmful to metabolic, endocrine and cardiovascular homoeostatic mechanisms in postnatal life. The exact mechanisms that lead to reprogramming during fetal life need thorough investigation before effective strategies to deal with this problem can be devised.

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  • Agent and web-based technologies in network management

    Wren, Matthew J.; Gutierrez, Jairo A. (1999)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. A close look at agent and Web-based technologies and their use in the management of networks is the main theme of this paper. An analysis of how this area has changed substantially, resulting in new difficulties and challenges for information systems professionals is provided. The components of network management, including people, information; the network infrastructure, systems and network management, and their interactions are looked at initially. The changes that have occurred in this area will be outlined by this analysis, and the resulting problems and complexities described. From this point the potential role for agent technology in providing some degree of solution is explored. This exploration also considers some of the negative implications, and introduces a model proposed as the basis of an integrated agent and Web-based network management environment

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  • Performance evaluation of a multiple-cell CDMA radio system

    Sathyendran, A.; Sowerby, K.W.; Shafi, M. (1994)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. A statistical method for evaluating the performance measures of the base to mobile link of a multiple-cell CDMA system is presented. Specifically, techniques and expressions for estimating the short term average bit-error-rate (BER), service reliability and link availability are developed. The link performance is estimated for a mobile at the vertex of multiple adjacent cells. In the analysis, the system is assumed to employ coherent BPSK modulation and direct sequence spreading and the received signals are assumed to undergo Rayleigh fading, log-normal shadowing and frequency selective fading. The effects of power control and error correction are also investigated

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  • Quantum optics with large x(3) nonlinearities

    Walls, D.F.; Rebic, S.; Parkins, A.S.; Dunstan, M.; Collett, M.J. (1998)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. Summary form only given. For applications in quantum optics it is necessary that the quantum noise resulting from spontaneous emission by the atoms be small. The reduction of absorption in these systems effectively reduces the spontaneous emission. The use of quantum coherence effects to reduce quantum noise in atomic systems was first proposed by Dalton, Reid and Walls. An analysis of quantum noise in three level atoms interacting with 2 light fields by Gheri et al. demonstrated that a nonlinear phase shift could be imposed on the probe beam due to the signal. This particular configuration utilised a “ghost transition” where the population in one transition was nearly zero, thus the quantum noise due to spontaneous emission was negligible and the conditions for a good QND measurement were satisfied. This was verified in a recent experiment by Roch et al who using cold trapped atoms and the “ghost transition” scheme, obtained the best QND correlation scheme to date

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  • Data cache parameter measurements

    Li, Enyou; Thomborson, Clark (1998)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. We extend prior research by Saavedra and Smith on designing microbenchmarks to measure data cache parameters. Unlike Saavedra and Smith, we measure the parameters by characterizing read accesses separately from write accesses; and we do not assume that the address mapping function is a bit-selection. We can measure the cache capacity C, block size b, and associativity a; we can measure the cache-hit access time and penalty for read and write; we can determine whether a cache allocates on write; we can detect write-back and write-through policies. We present experimental results for two CPU/cache structures, a 200 MHz Pentium with MMX and a 180 MHz Pentium Pro

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  • Mining association rules in temporal databases

    Ye, Xinfeng; Keane, John A. (1998)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. Association rules are used to express “interesting” relationships between items of data in a standard enterprise database. In a temporal database, each tuple is given a start and an end time indicating the period during which the information recorded in the tuple is valid. With a temporal database, we may wish to discover relationships between items which satisfy certain timing constraints. Existing algorithms for mining association rules cannot be applied to temporal databases directly. This is because, in the existing algorithms, if an itemset is supported by a tuple, the tuple must contain all the items in the itemset. For temporal databases, an itemset, e.g. {A,B}, is supported as long as all the items in {A,B} are contained in a set of tuples which satisfy certain timing constraint (e.g. the duration of the tuples containing A and B overlap each other). In this paper, an algorithm for mining association rules in temporal databases is described. The algorithm allows (a) the itemsets to contain composite items, and (b) the timing constraint on the tuples to be specified by the users

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  • The poor perfomance of NaOH in the dissolution of whey protein gels and very high pH

    Mercadé-Prieto, R.; Chen, X. D.; Falconer, R.; Paterson, W.; Wilson, I. (2005)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. It is reported in the literature that when cleaning whey protein concentrate fouling layers or gels with highly concentrated NaOH solutions the cleaning rate is very low. This phenomenon is particularly evident at pH values above 13.5 and at temperatures below 50°C. Experiments have been performed on whey gels at the Universities of Auckland and Cambridge to elucidate the mechanisms involved in those conditions, as well as for lower pH values. The results suggest that at pH < 13, the dissolution rate is controlled by the β-elimination of the intermolecular disulfide bonds present in the WPC gels. At pH > 13, the NaOH in the gel is suggested to induce new intermolecular crosslinks that make the gels more alkali-resistant. Dissolution experiments with caustic-induced gels show that the presence of NaOH in whey gels can greatly enhance their resistance to alkali.

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  • Fouling mitigation with synthetic fibres in a caso4 supersaturated solution.

    Rost, M.; Duffy, G. G. (2007)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. Wood pulp fibre suspensions and model synthetic fibre suspensions have been shown previously to mitigate effectively calcium sulphate fouling in heat exchangers. Fibre flexibility was found to be a decisive fibre property in fouling mitigation. Adding fibres to a fouling fluid is environmentally benign and can be applied during operation without shutting down the heat exchanger. Because polymer fibres are more robust in a hostile environment, further work was initiated with two types of rayon fibre and one acrylic fibre of the same fibre length. Experiments were performed at both constant and varying fibre volume concentrations. The more flexible rayon fibres in suspension produced lower ultimate-fouling resistance values than the stiffer acrylic fibres. Fibres were embedded in the fouling layer and it is believed that this mechanism contributed to the overall fouling resistance and was a counterpart to the positive effects of fibres mitigating fouling. The more flexible fibres momentarily form viscoelastic bundles that can ‘absorb’ hydrodynamic shear forces, modify the turbulent stresses, and lower the fouling matter removal rate. Stiff fibres embedded in the deposit protrude into the bulk flow and entrap more fibres as they are less likely to deflect, bend, and be flattened by the shear stresses near the wall

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  • Extraction of Polyphenolics from Apple Juice by Foam Fractionation

    Saleh, Zaid; Stanley, Roger; Nigam, Mayank (2006)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. This research was undertaken to test the feasibility of using the foam technology to separate polyphenols from fruit juices for use as functional food ingredients. The separation performance, expressed as enrichment ratio, selectivity and percentage recovery, was determined as a function of operating variables, namely air or N2 flow rate, initial feed concentration, bubble size, solution pH and the presence of alcohol to modify the surface tension. Measurements were made of the average bubble size and gas hold-up volume to calculate interfacial area. The bulk phase concentrations of the polyphenolics in the feed and foam fractions were analysed for total phenolic content by Folin assay and phenolic composition by reverse phase HPLC. Enrichment factors of up to 6 were found under optimum conditions of low sugar concentration (6-9 oBrix), low flow rate (0.2-0.6 ml min-1) and acidic pH (3-4). However recoveries were low at around 30% of total phenolics and selectivity was poor. It was concluded that foam fractionation represents a potential low cost technology to recover a proportion of the polyphenolic content in an enriched juice concentrate suitable for use as a functional ingredient.

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  • A mobile sensor activity for ad-hoc groups

    Parsons, David; Thomas, H.; Inkila, Milla (2017-05-10T05:37:51Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Designing mobile learning activities requires us to consider which key affordances of mobile devices can support the optimum learning experience. This short paper reports on the design and testing of a BYOD mobile learning activity that was based on an analysis of affordances and a survey of student preferences. It outlines the affordances and preferences that were identified and how these were included in a broader set of design requirements. It explains the choice of tools adopted for the activity, and how they were integrated into the overall learning experience based on using mobile devices to find locations and gather sensor data. Some interim observations are made around the experience and the collaborative data set gathered by the participants.

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  • To what extent is critical thinking affected by language demands in a level seven technical degree course?

    Marsden, Nick; Singh, Niranjan; Clarke, David (2016-04)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Critical thinking can be said to be among the louder ‘buzz phrases’ in education in the 21st century. Both critical thinking and communication are key employability skills. Whilst there is a body of research on critical thinking, and its role in pedagogy, there seems to be a dearth of research linking second language ability and critical thinking. This area probably needs further examination given that it relates to subject specific discourse. Moreover the debate about domain-specific and generalist critical thinking skills is arguably impacted by language in ways that could disadvantage non-native English speakers in their assessed work. This research, carried out with Automotive students in New Zealand, suggests the language support currently given on a Bachelor level course in Automotive may not be adequate, and might need to be made available in different ways because perceptions of language ability may impact on success. The findings from this project suggest that automotive students might in fact prefer more language support. This information would be useful for course designers and facilitators at institutions elsewhere, particularly where courses might attract large numbers of non-native speakers either as international or domestic students. In either case, their perceived needs and expectations on the level of language support required to succeed are a focal point of this project.

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  • Sharing Building Information using the IFC Data Model for FDS Fire Simulation

    Dimyadi, Johannes; Spearpoint, M.; Amor, R. (2008)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    This paper describes part of a research project that looks into the potential and challenge of using the Industry Foundation Classes (IFC) open standard building information model in fire engineering design. In particular the paper describes work undertaken to share building geometry and other information with the Fire Dynamics Simulator (FDS) fire simulation model. A commercially available building information modeling (BIM) authoring application has been used to create building geometries and export IFC data files. A web-based conversion tool has been created to generate FDS input data given the output from a dedicated fire engineering IFC parser tool. The capabilities and outcome of data sharing process is illustrated in this paper using a simple test case building.

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  • E-books - essentials or extras? The University of Auckland Library experience

    Mincic-Obradovic, Ksenija (2004)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    The e-publishing industry is developing rapidly, providing new opportunities for libraries, but creating new challenges as well. Questions on how best to integrate e-books into the learning environment are pressing. In 2003, the University of Auckland Library provided access to nearly 80,000 e-books through the library catalogue only. This paper will explore some of the theoretical and practical issues of implementing e-books in the University of Auckland Library, covering such issues as: - Integration - Workflow - Differences in perception/acceptance of digital texts - Response from students and staff - User preferences and reasons for these

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  • Exploring changes in Nitrate contamination in the coastal and Hautere zone Aquifer Wellington New Zealand

    Wanigasekera, Deepthi Jayatha Dias-; De Costa, Gregory; Worden, John; Wanigasekera, Beatrice Dias- (2013)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Fifteen years of groundwater quality monitoring in the Kapiti Coast by the local authority in Wellington, New Zealand, has identified an area of elevated nitrate concentrations in the Te Horo area, with some monitoring bores testing for concentrations above 5 mg/L. However, recent analysis seems to indicate that contaminant levels have decreased from what was previously recorded, although still remaining elevated. The purpose of this study is to investigate if changes in nitrate concentrations over time were significant, and, if so, determine which factors have contributed to these changes. Initial temporal trend analysis indicated that nitrate concentrations since 1993 have decreased in the majority of monitoring bores. Tobit regression analysis was subsequently undertaken using several land use, land cover, soil type, climate and chemical explanatory variables. Results indicated that beef cattle farming, fruit growing, settlements and lifestyle blocks were associated with increased nitrate concentrations. Groundwaters higher in dissolved oxygen which underlie fine sandy loam soils (which are highly permeable soils) were also identified as been susceptible to higher nitrate concentrations.It was ultimately determined that the temporal decrease in concentrations is best explained by improved land use practices as physical characteristics and land cover overlying groundwater had not changed substantially and thereby explaining the decreasing trend in nitrate concentrations.

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  • Perceptions of older international tertiary students towards the sustainable future environment in New Zealand

    Theron, Bernhardett; Du Plessis, Andries; Toh, William; Sabarwal, Anu (2015-12)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Sustainability refers to utilising the earth’s natural resources wisely to meet the necessities of lives but also to save the resources for future generations to survive. This research investigated perceptions of international students towards conservation and sustainable living at an international tertiary institution, UUNZ, in Auckland New Zealand. A quantitative method was applied; 92 questionnaires were distributed. The research aims to establish what international students’ attitudes and perception towards sustainability and the environment are; a correlation between age, nationality, religion and their perceptions towards sustainable living. The results revealed a negative correlation between students’ concern and perception towards sustainability and an increase in age (age 40 and older); a decrease in sustainable living. Recommendations form the last section.

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