83 results for Conference poster, 2000

  • Identifying and Visualizing Surface Detail on Michelangelo's David

    Rugis, John (2007)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    We present the results of new experiments in which we have identified, characterized, and produced visualizations of selected fine surface detail on Michelangelo’s David statue. Starting with available raw scan data [Levoy et al. 2000], we have applied a number of techniques, both developed and refined by us, including the calculation of curvature maps, 2.5D spatial noise filtering, texture projection merging [Rugis 2006], and image processing assisted physical measurement. ....

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  • The development of a whey-based kefir beverage: Physiocochemical, sensory and microbiological characteristics

    Chan, Cheuk; Quek, Siew-Young; Roberton, AM (2007-11-15)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • New antifungal and antibacterial compounds: 1,3-oxazoline- and 1,3-oxazolidine-2-thiones

    Oliveira, Maria; Justino, J; Silva, S; Tatibouet, A; Rollin, P; Rauter, AP (2009-01-20)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Purine nucleosides as new agents for the control of Alzheimer’s disease

    Oliveira, Maria; Marcelo, F; Justino, J; Jacob, AP; Bleriot, Y; Sinay, P; Goulart, M; Rauter, AP (2009-01-20)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Purine Nucleosides as Cholinesterase Inhibitors

    Marcelo, F; Rauter, AP; Blériot, Y; Sinaÿ, P; Oliveira, Maria; Goulart, M; Justino, J (2008-09)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Getting Research 'Out There': ResearchSpace@Auckland

    Newton-Wade, Vanessa; Laurie, John; Hayes, Leonie (2007)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    A key part of the academic research process is publishing the results – ‘getting it out there’. An institutional repository such as ResearchSpace@Auckland provides authors with a channel for near-instantaneous worldwide dissemination of research. ResearchSpace@Auckland has been developed at the University of Auckland under the umbrella of the Institutional Repositories Aotearoa Project (Ira). Built using DSpace Open Source Software, the repository contains ‘research outputs’ from the University of Auckland’s staff and students, including theses, papers and reports. The PhD thesis collection is the flagship of the repository – electronic submission is compulsory for all completing PhD students from 2011. The initial 200 items in the PhD thesis collection were gathered by contacting authors of theses submitted at the University of Auckland since 2001 and inviting them to submit digital copies and consent forms. Trials are underway to digitize theses that are unavailable in digital format. The mandating of compulsory submission for PhD theses submitted at the University of Auckland ensures regulatory requirements for digital deposit are catered for. Other collections for articles, papers, and images are being developed.

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  • Registry of BioBricks models using CellML

    Rouilly, Vincent; Canton, Barry; Nielsen, Poul; Kitney, Richard (2007)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. One of the main goals in Synthetic Biology is to assess the feasibility of building novel biological systems from interchangeable and standardized parts. In order to collect and share parts, a Registry of standardized DNA BioBricks http://parts.mit.edu/registry has been established at the MIT. BioBricks can be assembled to form devices and systems to operate in living cells. Design of reliable devices and systems would benefit from accurate models of system function. To predict the function of systems built from many parts, we need to have accurate models for the parts and mechanisms to easily compose those part models into a system model. Therefore, in parallel to increasing the number of parts available and characterising them experimentally, a logical extension to the Registry would be to build a Registry of BioBrick models to complement the physical parts.

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  • Space-Time Multi-Resolution Banded Graph-Cut for Fast Segmentation. (Conference Poster)

    Vaudrey, Tobi; Gruber, Daniel; Wedel, Andreas; Klappstein, Jens (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Conference Details: 30th Annual Symposium of the German Association for Pattern Recognition DAGM Munich, Germany, June 2008. http://www.dagm2008.org/ Applying real-time segmentation is a major issue when processing every frame of image sequences. In this paper, we propose a modi cation of the well known graph-cut algorithm to improve speed for discrete segmentation. Our algorithm yields real-time segmentation, using graph-cut, by performing a single cut on an image with regions of di erent resolutions, combining space-time pyramids and narrow bands. This is especially suitable for image sequences, as segment borders in one image are re ned in the next image. The fast computation time allows one to use information contained in every image frame of an input image stream at 20 Hz, on a standard PC. The algorithm is applied to traf- c scenes, using a monocular camera installed in a moving vehicle. Our results show the segmentation of moving objects with similar results to standard graph-cut, but with improved speed.

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  • Goal: Real-Time Segmentation via Graph Cut Goal: Real-Time Segmentation via Graph Cut

    Vaudrey, Tobi; Wedel, Andreas; Rabe, Clemens; Klappstein, Jens; Klette, Reinhard (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Conference Details: 2008 23rd International Conference Image and Vision Computing New Zealand. IVCNZ 08. Lincoln University, Christchurch, 26-28 November 2008. http://www.lvl.co.nz/ivcnz2008/ The detection of moving objects is a crucial part of driver assistance systems. This paper tackles this issue using computer vision. Two approaches are investigated, monocular and stereoscopic. The base principals and implementational issues are discussed and detailed, high- lighting areas of concern. In both cases, the detection is based on motion analysis of individually tracked image points (optical ow). The monoc- ular approach relies solely on the optical ow, where as the stereoscopic approach also takes stereo depth information into account. In both ap- proaches the motion analysis provides a motion metric which corresponds to the likelihood that the tracked point is moving. Based on this metric the points are segmented into objects by employing the globally op- timal graph cut algorithm. These approaches are then compared and contrasted using real-world vehicle image sequences.

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  • Benefits of speech & language therapy for hearing impaired children

    Fairgray, Liz; Purdy, Suzanne (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Conference details: Reflecting Connections 2008, the second conference jointly hosted by the New Zealand Speech-Language Therapists Association and Speech Pathology Australia. Held at the SKYCITY Convention Centre in Auckland, New Zealand, from the 25th to the 29th of May, 2008. http://www.reflectingconnections.co.nz/ Although the need for speech and language therapy is widely recognized for children who are hearing impaired, there is little research evidence for improved outcomes after specific speech and language therapy interventions. With improvements in hearing aid and cochlear implant technology, and consequently improved access to the speech signal, there has been greater emphasis on listening-based therapies. The most widely used therapy is referred to as “auditory-verbal therapy” (AVT). This approach is endorsed by the Alexander Graham Bell Association, but there is paucity of research evidence for AVT effectiveness (Rhoades, 1982; Goldberg & Flexer, 1993; Wray et al., 1997; Rhoades & Chisholm, 2000). Previous studies have focused on psychosocial and educational outcomes of AVT, rather than measuring specific speech and language outcomes. The current study investigates speech and language, speech perception in noise and reading abilities before and after a 6-month period of weekly AVT with an experienced Certified Auditory-Verbal and Speech-language Therapist. Participants are eight children aged 5 to 17 years with moderate-profound sensorineural hearing loss using cochlear implants (CI) and/or hearing aids.

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  • Design of a water soluble amethyrin macrocycle

    Albrett, Amelia; Brothers, Penelope; Aguilar, A; Lee, JT; Sessler, JL (2006-07)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    This JPP issue contains all abstracts accepted for presentation at the Fourth International Conference of Porphyrins and Phthalocyanines (ICPP-4) which was held in Rome, Italy, July 2-7, 2006 and coorganized by Drs Roberto Paolesse and Pietro Tagliatesta from the University of Rome “Tor Vergata”. The printed book of abstracts was given to all ICPP-4 attendees, being a necessary tool to follow the rich scientific program of the meeting, and should also prove useful to those readers of JPP who were not able to attend the biennial scientific meeting of the Society of Porphyrins and Phthalocyanines (SPP).

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  • Operational Decision Making for Aluminium Smelters

    Gao, Yashuang; Taylor, Mark; Chen, JJJ; Hautus, Michael (2008-11-26)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Many computer systems incorporating artificial intelligence have been introduced for use in industry to assist in making decisions and controlling processes. However, decision making in a complex industrial plant, such as an aluminium smelter, involves psychologically related factors such as intuitive reasonings, operator response characteristics, perception of risk, and implication of rewards. While a significant body of work does exist on decision science, research concerning human interaction with process control systems is still at the development stage. The work reported here aims to meet the needs of the process industry by incorporating human factors and decision making strategies into computer programs such as a supervisory control system for aluminium smelters. A case study on the control of the level of the liquid electrolyte was carried out to firstly facilitate an understanding of the variables, including human factors, on process control. It was found that the availability of crushed solidified electrolyte material had a significant impact on the level of the liquid electrolyte, while the implementation of a supervisory control system had a certain impact, management and leadership styles also had a significant influence.

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  • The management of change in social services in Aotearoa New Zealand: An examination of the influence of post 1987 'new public managerialism, on organizational culture

    Webster, Michael (2009-03-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    New public managerialism’ has transformed organizational cultures of public/NGO sectors ‘Government by contract’ inaugurated: Accountability for specified outputs Performance agreements between Ministers and Chief Executives Devolution of accountability required managers to develop leadership skills, strategic thinking, business planning, and performance management systems International Federation of Social Work recognition of management (‘core purpose of social work’) professionally validates the project

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  • Cell proliferative and radioprotective properties of bioactive Salvia sclareoides extracts

    Ruivo, D; Oliveira, Maria; Rauter, AP; Justino, J; Goulart, M (2008-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • New sugar agents for the control of undesirable microbes in the food industry

    Oliveira, Maria; Justino, J; Neves, A; Rauter, AP (2007-11-14)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • What drives bacterial community structure in stream biofilms?

    Roberts, Kelly; Lear, Gavin; Turner, Susan; Lewis, Gillian (2008-08-17)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    BACKGROUND The microorganisms within biofilms are the key basal trophic level within most freshwater systems. However, microbial structure, function and succession in natural stream systems remain poorly understood. This research characterises the biofilm community structure of stream biofilms experiencing different anthropogenic impacts and how they change over time. Our aim is describe the changes in bacterial biofilm communities over time and to investigate what drives these changes.

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  • Characterisation of the Genetic and Hormone controls of Branching in Petunia

    Simons, Joanne; Templeton, K; Plummer, K; Beveridge, C; Snowden, K (2004-09)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Institutional Collaboration around Institutional Repositories

    Hayes, Leonie; Stevenson, Alison; Mason, Ingrid; Scott, Anne; Kennedy, Peter (2007)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Three New Zealand universities have been collaborating on a project to provide open, web-based, access to research outputs through the creation of institutional repositories using the DSpace software. This poster will therefore address the theme of eResearch with particular focus on the benefits of active collaboration, intra-university, inter-university and international, in this area of activity. New Zealand has a small population of 4 million, an innovative and resourceful academic community, a newly implemented research funding model, based on performance (PBRF) and a readiness to stay competitive with the rest of the world. Institutional Repositories in New Zealand are in their infancy but a considerable body of experience already exists overseas which we can draw upon if we work in partnership with those institutions who have already implemented institutional repositories. Funding is limited but by sharing resources and working collaboratively each institution can make substantial progress towards the creation of individual repositories. This poster reports on the joint project between the University of Auckland, the University of Canterbury and Victoria University of Wellington. The three partners have been funded by the New Zealand Tertiary Education Commission to make available, via the Internet for access by Open Archives Initiative (OAI) compliant search engines, research outputs created by staff and students of the three partner institutions. This poster will present information on the work to: • Establish DSpace repositories in partner institutions that conform to the OAI-PMH standard. • Contribute to the development of linkages with the Australian DEST funded information infrastructure projects, i.e. ADT, APSR and ARROW projects. • Identify methods for increasing academic understanding of, and promoting contributions to, digital repositories the content of which is then available to enhance teaching and learning, as well as research. • Provide digital materials, either through the deposit of “born digital” material or through digitisation of material already available in print, that contribute to the developing digital content landscape as envisaged in the NZ Digital Strategy • Contribute to national research resource discovery service to be established by the National Library of New Zealand. Ensure that the content in the project repositories is visible for harvesting by global OAI-compliant search engines such as Google Scholar, OAIster, etc. Collaborate with other IR projects and communicate the lessons learned to the wider tertiary and research communities of New Zealand

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  • Can tree weta detect terrestrial bats

    Lomas, Kathryn; Field, LH; Wild, John; Kubke, Maria; Parsons, Stuart (2008-10)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Interactions between insects and bats are well-known examples of predator-prey co-evolution. For example, moths have evolved hearing abilities that allow them to respond to sounds in the ultrasound range, thus enabling them to detect the echolocation calls of hunting bats and perform evasive manoeuvres (Roeder 1998). Although New Zealand insects are preyed upon by endemic bats, no studies have examined whether they possess similar strategies for predator avoidance. If auditory information is used to detect and avoid predation, then the frequencies of greatest sensitivity of the auditory organ are predicted to correspond to the echolocation frequency (or other hunting-related sounds) produced by predatory bats. New Zealand has two endemic bats, the long tailed bat (Chalinolobus tuberculatus) and lesser short tailed bat (Mystacina tuberculata). Long tailed bats are typical aerial insectivores and are not known to prey on weta.

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  • Practice-led curricula: driving from the front or rear seat?

    Adamson, Carole (2009-11-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Do knowledge-driven or practice-led models best serve the needs of social work practitioners engagin

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