83 results for Conference poster, 2000

  • Purine nucleosides as new agents for the control of Alzheimer’s disease

    Oliveira, Maria; Marcelo, F; Justino, J; Jacob, AP; Bleriot, Y; Sinay, P; Goulart, M; Rauter, AP (2009-01-20)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Antifungal properties of sugar lactones

    Oliveira, Maria; Neves, A; Justino, J; Noronha, JP; Marcelo, F; Riccombeni, A; Rauter, AP (2005)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Purine Nucleosides as Cholinesterase Inhibitors

    Marcelo, F; Rauter, AP; Blériot, Y; Sinaÿ, P; Oliveira, Maria; Goulart, M; Justino, J (2008-09)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The development of a whey-based kefir beverage: Physiocochemical, sensory and microbiological characteristics

    Chan, Cheuk; Quek, Siew-Young; Roberton, AM (2007-11-15)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • New antifungal and antibacterial compounds: 1,3-oxazoline- and 1,3-oxazolidine-2-thiones

    Oliveira, Maria; Justino, J; Silva, S; Tatibouet, A; Rollin, P; Rauter, AP (2009-01-20)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Cell proliferative and radioprotective properties of bioactive Salvia sclareoides extracts

    Ruivo, D; Oliveira, Maria; Rauter, AP; Justino, J; Goulart, M (2008-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • New sugar agents for the control of undesirable microbes in the food industry

    Oliveira, Maria; Justino, J; Neves, A; Rauter, AP (2007-11-14)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Characterisation of the Genetic and Hormone controls of Branching in Petunia

    Simons, Joanne; Templeton, K; Plummer, K; Beveridge, C; Snowden, K (2004-09)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Characterisation of the Genetic Controls of Branching in Petunia

    Simons, Joanne; Templeton, KR; Plummer, K; Beveridge, CA; Snowden, KC (2005-10-12)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Branching is a fundamental process affecting plant form and is a source of much of the wide variety of plant architecture seen in nature. Our aim is to understand the function of genes involved in branching using petunia as a model system. This research involves the study of the decreased apical dominance (dad) mutants in petunia, which have increased basal branching compared with wild type. It also involves the investigation of genes known to affect branching in other plant species to discover their effects in petunia. One of these genes, MAX2, was identified from an increased branching mutant in Arabidopsis, and its effects in petunia are being investigated by misexpression of the petunia orthologue. Previous grafting experiments using the dad mutants in petunia have shown that a graft-transmissible signal is involved in causing the increased branching phenotype. Hormones are graft-transmissible chemicals and variation in their levels play important roles in the control of apical dominance, one of the most studied controls in lateral branching. Auxin and cytokinin levels in dad mutant and wild type plants were investigated, but the levels of these hormones were not consistent with them being the graft-transmissible signal modified by the DAD genes. In order to investigate the relationships between the DAD genes, the branching phenotypes of the single and double dad mutants were characterised and analysed. Grafting experiments to investigate the interactions between the DAD genes in controlling the branching signal were also undertaken. This work has revealed interactions between the DAD genes and provided evidence for the order of action of these genes.

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  • Development of an organisational memory scale

    Dunham, Annette (2007-12-06)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    In many countries, people are retiring earlier than ever before and the retirement of the baby boom generation over the next two decades further intensifies the impact of this trend. Accompanying this development, are fears about the potential loss of organisational knowledge or memory which may equate to the loss of the organisation’s competitive advantage. Organisations, while recognizing that older workers often possess valuable “organisational memory” seem to also assume these same workers will readily divest themselves of their knowledge. Encouraging experienced workers to act as a mentor to younger or less experienced workers, is often mentioned in the management and related literature as a way of capturing and retaining valuable organisational knowledge. However, employees (including older workers) in the possession of considerable organisational memory, may, or may not be willing to divulge their knowledge to others, for a number of reasons. This poster presents initial results from the first of a series of studies designed to examine the relationship between organisational memory in the individual and propensity to mentor. It outlines the development and exploratory factor analysis of an “Organisational Memory” scale that taps the individual’s own resources in terms of organisational knowledge and expertise. Subsequent studies in the proposed research aim to help organisations more effectively target potential mentors for the purposes of retaining organisational knowledge, while also identifying the relevant costs and benefits of mentoring perceived by those individuals. By doing so it is hoped organisations will have a clearer understanding of how they can minimize costs while emphasising the benefits of such a relationship for the potential mentor. In contrast to the “development outcomes” focus of much of the mentoring literature, these studies give attention to the “knowledge sharing role of mentoring, while also touching on developmental outcomes, in this case, for the mentor

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  • Is keratoconus a case of matrix remodelling gone crazy?

    Brookes, Nigel; Loh, IP; Clover, GM; Poole, CA; Sherwin, Trevor (2002)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Protein-Based Identification of Epithelial Cell Types in Forensic Samples

    Simons, Joanne; Vintiner, SK (2007-09-04)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Although the value of DNA profiles found at a crime scene is indisputable, there is increasing importance in identifying the cellular source of the DNA as well as the identity of the person to whom the profile belongs. Knowledge regarding the cellular source from which the DNA profile originates increases the evidential value of the sample. Our research involves investigation of protein candidates in order to find an epithelial cell type-specific protein that will enable differentiation of vaginal, buccal and skin cells in forensic samples. We have used several methods including histochemical stains, western analysis and immunohistochemistry to investigate candidate proteins known to be present in various types of epithelial cells. Our most current results from these studies will be presented here.

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  • What drives bacterial community structure in stream biofilms?

    Roberts, Kelly; Lear, Gavin; Turner, Susan; Lewis, Gillian (2008-08-17)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    BACKGROUND The microorganisms within biofilms are the key basal trophic level within most freshwater systems. However, microbial structure, function and succession in natural stream systems remain poorly understood. This research characterises the biofilm community structure of stream biofilms experiencing different anthropogenic impacts and how they change over time. Our aim is describe the changes in bacterial biofilm communities over time and to investigate what drives these changes.

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  • Benefits of speech & language therapy for hearing impaired children

    Fairgray, Liz; Purdy, Suzanne (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Conference details: Reflecting Connections 2008, the second conference jointly hosted by the New Zealand Speech-Language Therapists Association and Speech Pathology Australia. Held at the SKYCITY Convention Centre in Auckland, New Zealand, from the 25th to the 29th of May, 2008. http://www.reflectingconnections.co.nz/ Although the need for speech and language therapy is widely recognized for children who are hearing impaired, there is little research evidence for improved outcomes after specific speech and language therapy interventions. With improvements in hearing aid and cochlear implant technology, and consequently improved access to the speech signal, there has been greater emphasis on listening-based therapies. The most widely used therapy is referred to as “auditory-verbal therapy” (AVT). This approach is endorsed by the Alexander Graham Bell Association, but there is paucity of research evidence for AVT effectiveness (Rhoades, 1982; Goldberg & Flexer, 1993; Wray et al., 1997; Rhoades & Chisholm, 2000). Previous studies have focused on psychosocial and educational outcomes of AVT, rather than measuring specific speech and language outcomes. The current study investigates speech and language, speech perception in noise and reading abilities before and after a 6-month period of weekly AVT with an experienced Certified Auditory-Verbal and Speech-language Therapist. Participants are eight children aged 5 to 17 years with moderate-profound sensorineural hearing loss using cochlear implants (CI) and/or hearing aids.

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  • Can tree weta detect terrestrial bats

    Lomas, Kathryn; Field, LH; Wild, John; Kubke, Maria; Parsons, Stuart (2008-10)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Interactions between insects and bats are well-known examples of predator-prey co-evolution. For example, moths have evolved hearing abilities that allow them to respond to sounds in the ultrasound range, thus enabling them to detect the echolocation calls of hunting bats and perform evasive manoeuvres (Roeder 1998). Although New Zealand insects are preyed upon by endemic bats, no studies have examined whether they possess similar strategies for predator avoidance. If auditory information is used to detect and avoid predation, then the frequencies of greatest sensitivity of the auditory organ are predicted to correspond to the echolocation frequency (or other hunting-related sounds) produced by predatory bats. New Zealand has two endemic bats, the long tailed bat (Chalinolobus tuberculatus) and lesser short tailed bat (Mystacina tuberculata). Long tailed bats are typical aerial insectivores and are not known to prey on weta.

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  • Using neuroanatomical imaging to learn about New Zealand's endemic species

    Corfield, Jeremy; Wild, John; Parsons, Stuart; Kubke, Maria (2009-08)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Isolated from the world, New Zealand became a place where birds, in the absence of terrestrial mammals, evolved a diverse assortment of shapes, sizes and behaviours.

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  • Modelling NFAT Cycling Sensitivity in the Cardiac Myocyte

    Cooling, Michael; Hunter, Peter; Crampin, Edmund (2007-10-01)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The transcription factor NFAT acts as a signal integrator for a number of signal transduction pathways in cardiac myocytes that initiates gene expression in the disease Pathological Cardiac Hypertrophy[1]. Here we develop a quantitative mathematical model of the cytoplasmicnuclear-cytoplasmic cycling of NFAT in response to calcium signals in the cardiac myocyte

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  • Stream Restoration: Getting the microbial ecology right.

    Lewis, Gillian; Lear, Gavin; Turner, Susan; Boothroyd, Ian; Stott, Rebecca; Roberts, Kelly; Ancion, Pierre; Dopheide, Andrew; Washington, Vidya; Knight, Duane; Smith, Joanna (2008-08-17)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    A comprehensive program to re-establish the structure and function of an ecosystem, including its natural diversity and aquatic habitats.

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  • Bacterially mediated manganese deposition in novel "anelli" within the biofilms of an impacted urban stream

    Smith, JP; Lewis, Gillian (2007-12-02)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The purpose of this work is to identify bacteria responsible for the formation of manganese containing anelli within stream biofilms, and study their distribution. Manganese oxidising bacteria are part of a diverse group of organisms found commonly within many disparate environments, which deposit manganese and iron biominerals within biofilms and flocs [1]. The purpose of microbial manganese oxidation is poorly understood, but may be associated with energy production, mobilisation of nutrients, protection and/or detoxification [1, 2]. Manganese has a high sorptive capacity for heavy metals, metalloids, and other ions, as well as a strong oxidizing potential, and therefore frequently induces co-precipitation of cations present within the surrounding environment [1]. Within urban streams contaminants such as heavy metals may therefore potentially be concentrated within steam biofilms in the presence of manganese oxidising bacteria.

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  • A novel implantable blood pressure telemetry device: Comparison between Data Sciences and Telemetry Research systems

    Malpas, Simon; Lim, M; McCormick, John; Kirton, RS; Van Vliet, B; Easteal, Allan; Barrett, Carolyn; Guild, Sarah-Jane; Budgett, David (2008-04-05)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The pending expiry (May 2008) of a Data Sciences (DSI) patent in the area of blood pressure telemetry permits the development of alternative technologies. A key aspect in providing new telemetry systems is a comparison to existing technology. Important aspects include stability of the calibration over time and the ability to capture the pulsitile blood pressure waveform. In a group of 6 rats and 5 rabbits DSI blood pressure transmitters (C40 or D70 models) were implanted in conjunction with Telemetry Research (TR) transmitters. Both systems incorporate a fluid filled catheter of similar dimensions with a biocompatible gel in the tip. The blood pressure waveform was collected via telemetry for up to 2 months after implantation. The signal was sampled at 500 Hz and digitally transmitted to a receiver up to 5 m away The battery of TR transmitter was recharged within the rat using inductive power transfer technology. The pulsitile waveform associated with each heart beat was reflected similarly in all cases although the frequency response of DSI telemeters was limited to ~40 Hz (–3 dB rolloff point). The calibrated offset level between the two transmitters was not more than 5 mmHg at all times over a 2 month period. We conclude that the Telemetry Research blood pressure transmitters offer comparable performance to existing technology but with extra design advantages (rechargeable, co-housing of animals, greater range).

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