148 results for Conference poster, 2010

  • Can we minimize androgen deprivation therapy-related quality of life effects in Māori & Pacific prostate cancer survivors using a genetic stratification?

    Karunasinghe, N; Zhu, Y; Han, Dug; Lange, K; Wang, A; Zhu, Shuotun; Masters, J; Goudie, M; Keogh, J; Benjamin, B; Holmes, M; Ferguson, Lynnette (2015-11-15)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    BACKGROUND: Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is an effective palliation treatment for men with advanced prostate cancer (PC). This is a common treatment received by the majority of PC survivors among New Zealand (NZ) Maori men due to their late presentation of the disease. However, ADT have well documented side effects that could alter the patient’s quality of life (QoL). ADT involves suppression of androgens produced either by the testes or the adrenal gland or both. Adrenal androgen production involves conversion of androstenedione to testosterone by the aldo-keto reductase 1C3 (AKR1C3) enzyme. We have previously reported that the AKR1C3 rs12529 G allele is associated with a lower prostate specific antigen (PSA) level, which is a downstream product of androgens binding to the androgen receptor. The AKR1C3 rs12529 G allele frequency is 14.2% higher among Māori, Pacific and East Asian men compared to Caucasians in our study cohort. Therefore, the current assessment is to evaluate whether genetic stratification with the AKR1C3 rs12529 polymorphism could support decision making on ADT to minimize QoL effects. METHODS: A patient cohort with confirmed clinical diagnoses of PC was recruited with written consent from 2006-2014 to Urology studies carried out at the Auckland Cancer Society Research Centre, University of Auckland, NZ. Recruitment was carried out at hospitals managed under three District Health Boards of Auckland, and private Urology clinics from Waikato District, in NZ. From May 2013, patients were invited to complete a questionnaire that contained options for selecting PC treatment type/s received and a QoL survey. The primary outcomes were the percentage scores under each QoL subscale assessed using the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer quality of life questionnaires (EORTC QLQ-C30 and PR25). Genotyping of these men for the AKR1C3 rs12529 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was carried out using the Sequenom MassArray and iPlex system or the Applied Biosystem’s Taqman SNP genotyping procedure. Age at diagnosis, Gleason score and alcohol consumption were confounding variables between ADT and no ADT groups, and were corrected for subsequent analysis. Analysis of QoL scores were carried out against ADT duration or in association with the AKR1C3 rs12529 SNP using the Generalised Linear Model. P-values <0.02]. This increase among the rs12529 GG genotype (9.7) is therefore, equivalent to 59% of the mean hormone treatment-related symptom score of 16.5 (SD16.6) recorded in this study. INTERPRETATION: As 85.3% ADT recipients have used AA the current study is best interpreted as QoL effects of AAs. This study suggests a possibility for those stratified with the AKR1C3 rs12529 G allele to receive intermittent AA treatment to minimize QoL effects. If larger prospective studies can confirm these findings, PC survivors particularly those of Maori and Pacific ethnic groups may greatly benefit through optimal ADT options not only for their survival benefits, but also to better maintain their QoL.

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  • Who are Today's Dads?

    Underwood, Lisa; Atatoa Carr, P; Berry, S; Grant, Cameron; Morton, Susan (2015-12-14)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Cardiac response to weak electrical shocks challenges the functional syncytium paradigm

    Caldwell, Bryan; Trew, Mark; Pertsov, AM (2015-04-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Annotation of Clinical Datasets Using openEHR Archetypes

    Zivaljevic, Aleksandar; Atalag, Koray; de Bono, B; Hunter, Peter (2015-02-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Wind power in New Zealand Renewable energy resource dynamics in a hydro-based power system

    Suomalainen, Anna-Kristiina; Pritchard, G; Sharp, Basil; Yuan, Z; Zakeri, G (2013-12-02)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Quality of Life in Fit Elderly Patients with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) Receiving Oral Fludarabine-Based Regimens As First Line Therapy: Australasian Leukaemia and Lymphoma Group (ALLG) CLL5 Trial

    Suneet, S; Gill, D; Turner, PD; Renwick, WEP; Latimer, M; Mackinlay, N; Berkahn, Leanne; Simpson, DR; Campbell, P; Forsyth, C; Cull, G; Harrup, R; Best, G; Bressel, M; Di Iulio, J; Kuss, BJ; Mulligan, S (2015-12-03)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Are doctoral theses changing over time?

    Brailsford, Ian; Sowden, Elizabeth; Orioli Figueira, Brigida (2016-04-22)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    This poster presents longitudinal data on the length and chapter composition of 800 doctoral theses deposited at the University of Auckland between 2008 and 2015. Over this period, the doctoral statute has been amended to allow for more flexibility in the format of a thesis submitted for examination, such as the inclusion of creative practice and peer-reviewed publications. In addition, the funding mechanisms for doctorates in New Zealand have put a premium on candidates completing in a timely fashion. Given these two contexts we speculated that the length of an average doctoral thesis would be declining over time. One hundred doctoral theses – overwhelmingly PhD theses with a smattering of name doctorates –deposited in the University Library from each calendar year were randomly selected to assess: the number of pages; chapter composition; and inclusion of published papers within the thesis. These data were then correlated against academic faculty to tease out variations across the disciplines. Overall, our findings indicate that the doctoral thesis has remained relatively stable in length and chapter structure.

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  • Sequence Coverage Abnormalities and Sex-Specific Autosomal Regions in Cattle

    Lopdell, Thomas; Harland, C; Johnson, T; Keehan, M (2012-08-21)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Detection of tissue- and sex-specific gene expression in Bos taurus using high depth RNA sequencing

    Lopdell, Thomas; Littlejohn, M (2013-08-13)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Mid-term results after phaco-canaloplasty and canaloplasty

    Hurtikova, KH; Traine, PT; Loertscher, Martin; Mueller, MM (2015-06-06)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Preclinical rationale for the ongoing Phase 2 study of the hypoxia-activated EGFR-TKI tarloxotinib bromide (TH-4000) in patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) or skin (SCCS).

    Jackson, V; Silva, S; Abbattista, Maria; Guise, Christopher; Bull, Matthew; Ashoorzadeh, Amir; Hart, C; Pearce, T; Smaill, Jeffrey; Patterson, Adam (2015)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Pride and Prejudice: Social Workers’ Experiences of the Profession

    Staniforth, Barbara; Beddoe, L (2016-06-28)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Fostering the exchange of geoscience resources for knowledge exploration and discovery

    Whitehead, Brandon; Gahegan, Mark; Everett, M; Hills, S; Brodaric, B (2010-11-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Geoscience data capture is expensive. In order to extract maximum value, the data need to be consistently described, easily found, and then shared among those who need it. There has been recent momentum in the geoscience community to develop a common descriptive framework which facilitates data sharing. While storage and transfer standards are vital, they lack a descriptive element which standarizes the meaning of their contents. Metadata capture is appropriate for data stores, but often the terminology carries different meanings as domains become more specialised. For example, the term “migration” to a petroleum geochemist refers to the movement of hydrocarbons in geologic time, yet to a seismologist describes an imaging process. Furthermore, concepts associated with a term may change through time or as contextual factors in a discussion are modified. How, therefore, can the concepts evoked from geoscience resource terminology be defined and aligned to represent this multi-scaled orthogonal variability? Here we show how a community knowledge acquisition exercise was orchestrated to discuss fundamental concepts and their meanings as interpreted by leaders in basin characterization. The result of this exercise is a formal description of many of the features and processes associated with sedimentary basins, i.e. a basin ontology. This ontology allows the use of semantic connections between concepts as a backbone for search and discovery of research artifacts in large data stores.

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  • Elaborations on a theory of human problem solving

    Langley, Patrick; Trivedi, N (2013)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    In this paper, we present an extended account of human problem solving and describe its implementation within ICARUS, a theory of the cognitive architecture. We begin by reviewing the standard theory of problem solving, along with how previous versions of ICARUS have incorporated and expanded on it. Next we propose four additional elaborations that bring the framework into closer alignment with human problem-solving abilities. After this, we report results on a number of domains that demonstrate the benefits of these extensions. In closing, we discuss related work and note promising directions for additional research.

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  • Using stream biofilm microbial communities as indicators of freshwater ecosystem health

    Lewis, Gillian; Ancion, PY; Lear, G; Roberts, K; Washington, V (2010-08-23)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Stream biofilms are a complex aggregation of microorganisms embedded in a polymer matrix and cover almost every surface in freshwater environments. Because of their sedentary way of life, microorganisms associated with biofilms are affected by past and present environmental conditions and therefore constitute a potential integrative indicator of stream health. A wide range of experiments was conducted in both flow chamber microcosms and natural stream environments to investigate the main drivers of microbial community structure and composition and evaluate the potential use of biofilms as a bio-indicator of freshwater ecosystem health. Using community fingerprinting techniques such as terminal-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism and Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis as well as 16S rRNA gene clone libraries we investigated variations occurring in biofilm bacterial and ciliate protozoan communities. Initial experiments conducted in flow chamber microcosms showed that significant differences in microbial community structure could be detected within only a few days of exposure to common water contaminants and remained detectable weeks after transfer to uncontaminated water. Further research investigating biofilm of more than 60 stream sites variously impacted by urbanization revealed a strong separation between rural and urban streams and confirmed the potential use of stream biofilm as a bio-indicator of stream health. Environmental monitoring techniques developed in this project were then successfully tested to investigate the efficacy of an enclosed stormwater treatment system, where traditional biological indicators such as macro-benthic invertebrates were not available. We are now extending our research to 300 different streams in order to define a general Bacterial Community Index characterising stream ecosystem health based on the structure of biofilm bacterial communities.

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  • Progress Testing: Two Countries Divided by a Common Language

    O'Connor, Barbara; Lillis, Steven; Weston, Kimberley; Freeman, A; Bagg, Warwick (2014)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • At your service: An interactive, flexible web-service for translating classification systems and taxonomies

    Whitehead, Brandon; Banchuen, Tawan; Gahegan, Mark; Smart, William; Masoud-Ansari, S (2010-11-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Geoscientists have developed and applied classification systems and taxonomies in an effort to enhance and share their understanding of complex geoscience information. However, the classification systems and taxonomies used throughout the geosciences for land cover and land use, soils, geology are neither static nor universal; the classes that we use to represent the Earth vary considerably with time and from place to place. As a general example, think of a geologic map. There are instances when mapped data contains desirable categories, but the granularity of those categories is not suitable. There are also instances where two or more maps (or data sets) lack the desired categories, or the categories across maps are semantically incompatible. This is to be expected, given that: (i) new science, social and economic agendas change what we may wish to differentiate when we look at a map and (ii) new technologies make differentiation of previously inseperable classes more reliable, thus viable. This paper describes ongoing work to create a web-based semantic translation service that allows users to: (i) experiment with mappings between classification systems and taxonomies; (ii) visualize translation maps using a given mapping; and (iii) persist their translation maps, and share them with others. Semantic equivalence and similarity are supported via underlying ontologies, which also facilitate the merging and re-grouping of classes.

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  • Monitoring the health of New Zealand’s young people: A decade of surveillance research

    Clark, TC; Fleming, T; Bullen, P; Crengle, S; Denny, S; Dyson, B; Peiris John, R; Robinson, E; Rossen, F; Sheridan, J; Teevale, T; Utter, J; Fortune, S; Lewycka, S (2013)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Effects of complex milk lipid components on neurodevelopment in vitro

    Lim, JH; Hodgkinson, S; Dragunow, M; Norris, C; Vickers, M (2010-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Over-expression of Human Amylin Leads to Oligomerization and beta-cell Dysfunction Associated with Mitochondrial Uncoupling, Activation of c-Jun and Decrease Expression of JNK Interacting Protein-1

    Zhang, Shaoping; Liu, H; Chuang, CL; Li, XL; Au, M; Zhang, L; Cooper, GJS (2012-06-10)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Over-expression of human amylin (hA) in pancreatic β-cells has been shown to contribute to cytotoxic hA aggregation and islet amyloid formation that can lead to β-cell dysfunction in type-2 diabetes mellitus. We aimed to investigate the functional and molecular changes associated with hA oligomer formation and their relation to β-cell dysfunction and diabetes development using transgenic mouse model that over-expresses hA in their islet β-cells.We showed that both homozygous and hemizygous hA transgenic mice developed spontaneous diabetes with different elevated levels of hA and with different time frame of disease onset and death. Homozygous mice displayed hyperinsulinemia and self-limiting insulin resistance during the pre-diabetic state, whereas by contrast, hemizygous mice had a longer prediabetic phase without insulin resistance. Intracellular and extracellular oligomers were clearly detectable before onset of diabetes with strong correlation with the time of β-cell apoptosis occurred in homozygous but not in hemizygous mice, indicating a difference in the extent of cytotoxic oligomerization between these animals. In addition, RT-qPCR analysis demonstrated progressive decrease in β-cell expression of functional and key regulatory molecules such as insulin, amylin, Pdx1, MafA, Glut2 and GCK. We also detected changes in expression of the mitochondrial membrane protein UCP-2 which contributes to decreased mitochondrial function. Further molecular analysis demonstrated activation of c-Jun/JNK and decrease expression of JNK-interacting protein 1, suggesting their role in mediating beta-cell death/apoptosis. Our studies should lead to a better understanding of the role and regulation of hA-evoked β-cell dysfunction and β-cell death in diabetes

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