148 results for Conference poster, 2010

  • Apple Waste Preservation for Extraction of Antioxidants

    Zhan, D; Oliveira, Maria; Saleh, Z (2015-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    A huge amount of apple waste is generated from juice, cider and other apple product industries. This waste represents a cost and causes environmental problems. Apple waste is a rich source of polyphenolic compounds, mostly found in the apple peels and cores. Polyphenols are antioxidants with high value that can be extracted from the waste and exploited commercially. Proper methods of waste pasteurisation would allow its preservation and reduce waste degradation. In this study, diluted apple waste was pasteurised using three different technologies: thermal processing (TP), high pressure processing (HPP) and low pressure assisted thermal processing. The effect of processing on the waste native yeasts and moulds, inoculated Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast and antioxidants were investigated. TP at 60, 80 and 100 °C for 30 min, HPP at 300, 400 and 500 MPa for 10 min and 600 MPa for 20 min, and low pressure assisted thermal processing at 60, 80 and 100 °C with 2 MPa for 30 min were carried out. The total yeasts and moulds initially in the diluted apple waste was about 6.6×101 cfu/g, which was fully inactivated by the three technologies. S. cerevisiae inoculated in the waste was reduced by 5-log or more with all processing methods/conditions. HPP and low pressure assisted thermal processing treatments did not affect the antioxidant activity (DPPH-radical scavenging). However, both TPC and DPPH radical scavenging decreased with TP (p < 0.05). The results of this study can be helpful for designing appropriate conditions to pasteurise fruit industry byproducts for further extraction of high value antioxidants.

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  • Do you see what I see? - Surveillance and response

    Patel, Reena; Dixon, Robyn; Webster, Craig (2015-07-06)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Introduction: Early warning scoring systems and rapid response teams are important strategies to improve the detection of patient deterioration in hospitals. Initiation of an appropriate response relies on nurses recognising changes in patient condition and alerting the required emergency assistance team. Study Objective: To determine the level of concordance between the nurse’s assessment and that of the emergency team, based on early warning scores (EWS). Methods: An audit of data collected between June 2011 and May 2013 was undertaken and 2780 instances were reviewed in order to determine the degree of concordance on EWS scores between nurses initiating calls and those assigned by the emergency response team. Results: 881 instances lack of concordance was identified. In the majority of instances, the nurse overestimated the severity of the patient’s condition when compared to the emergency response team’s score. Conclusion: Such lack of concordance is problematic given that failure to activate an emergency response when required has obvious implications for patient safety while inappropriate referral to emergency response teams can result in inefficient use of resources.

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  • Variability in soil CO2 efflux across distinct urban land cover types

    Weissert, Lena; Salmond, Jennifer; Schwendenmann, Luitgard (2015-04-14)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    As a main source of greenhouse gases urban areas play an important role in the global carbon cycle. To assess the potential role of urban vegetation in mitigating carbon emissions we need information on the magnitude of biogenic CO2 emissions and its driving factors. We examined how urban land use types (urban forest, parklands, sportsfields) vary in their soil CO2 efflux.We measured soil CO2 efflux and its isotopic signature, soil temperature and soil moisture over a complete growing season in Auckland, New Zealand. Soil physical and chemical properties and vegetation characteristics were also measured. Mean soil CO2 efflux ranged from 4.15 to 12 molm 2 s 1.We did not find significant differences in soil CO2 efflux among land cover types due to high spatial variability in soil CO2 efflux among plots. Soil (soil carbon and nitrogen density, texture, soil carbon:nitrogen ratio) and vegetation characteristics (basal area, litter carbon density, grass biomass) were not significantly correlated with soil CO2 efflux. We found a distinct seasonal pattern with significantly higher soil CO2 efflux in autumn (Apr/May) and spring (Oct). In urban forests and sportsfields over 80% of the temporal variation was explained by soil temperature and soil water content. The 13C signature of CO2 respired from parklands and sportsfields (-20 permil - -25 permil) were more positive compared to forest plots (-29 permil) indicating that parkland and sportsfields had a considerable proportion of C4 grasses. Despite the large intra-urban variability, our results compare to values reported from other, often climatically different cities, supporting the hypothesis of homogenization across urban areas as a result of human management practices.

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  • Who are Today's Dads?

    Underwood, Lisa; Atatoa Carr, P; Berry, S; Grant, Cameron; Kingi, TK; Pryor, J; Nicholson, J; Verbiest, Marjolein; Morton, Susan (2016-07-06)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Dads play a crucial role in the lives of children. Who Are Today’s Dads? is a University of Auckland project related to the Growing Up in New Zealand study. We want to find out how dads shape their children’s early development, health and wellbeing. The “dads” of more than 5,000 6 year olds were invited to take part in an online questionnaire. We are interested in all “dads” not just those who are the biological fathers of their children but also step-dads, foster and/or adoptive parents, co-mums and other family members who fulfil a dad role. Another important focus of the study is the extent to which New Zealand children experience changes in “dads”. We will explore the diversity of individuals who are father figures to contemporary New Zealand children with a focus on their work, parent–child relationship and how engaged dads are with their Growing Up in New Zealand child. Our aim is to determine how current and future policy can be developed to enhance the role that modern “dads” can play to contribute positively to children’s early development.

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  • Loop closure and kinase selectivity in lung cancer

    Yosaatmadja, Yuliana; Squire, Christopher (2016-07-17)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Somatic mutations in tyrosine kinase receptors that causes aberrant signalling have been implicated in the development of lung cancer. Two such receptors, EGFR and FGFR kinases are directly involved in many cases of aggressive metastasis and drug resistance. The FGFR kinase family consists of four highly conserved receptor proteins (FGFR1 – FGFR4). FGFR pathways are the main cause of resistance to chemotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer patients, and 22% of them show over-expression of FGFR1. There are a number of small molecules in phase III clinical trials that target not only FGFR but also other kinases. A wide range of EGFR mutations are linked to lung cancer development in never-smokers or former smokers. The two most common mutations are exon 19 deletions and the point mutation L858R in exon 21. Many patients harbouring L858R acquire a secondary T790M mutation after treatment with gefitinib/erlotinib resulting in drug resistance. In the past few years AstraZeneca have developed drugs that target specific proteins, eg; AZD4547 (FGFR1 selective) and AZD9291 (selectivity for T790M/L858R EGFR). In an effort to design our own novel and selective inhibitors, we solved the structures of AZD4547 and AZD9291 in complex with FGFR and EGFR respectively. In both cases, the phosphate binding loop (P-loop) of the proteins forms an unusual “bent” structure wrapped closely around these inhibitors. We speculate that the ability of these compounds to induce P-loop closure is an important part of their respective selectivity mechanisms.

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  • Moving From Hard Copy to Online Marking Made Easy

    Li, C; Sheridan, Donald (2015-06)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Significant efficiencies can be made in marking classes with large enrolment using a workflow that involves existing or inexpensive technologies. This poster describes how innovative processes saved time, money, improved educational outcomes and quality assurance.

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  • Applying threshold concepts to unlock the ‘hidden’ core of a multifaceted health sciences curriculum

    Petersen, L; Egan, John; Barrow, Mark (2015-07-07)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Title: Applying threshold concepts to unlock the ‘hidden’ core of a multifaceted health sciences curriculum Background/context: In 2014, a curriculum implementation plan was developed to comprehensively map the existing Bachelor of Health Sciences (BHSc) curriculum so as to inform a cohesive workforce-related vision for the future. However, prior to mapping the curriculum, staff first needed to agree upon what the future-focused set of graduate capabilities across their diverse programme should be. To do so, we applied Meyer and Land’s (2003) notion of threshold concepts to enable us to unpack and clarify what felt like a complex, and at times hidden, core curriculum. Research/evaluation method: The existing BHSc programme was analysed using the frame of threshold concepts through a series of staff and student focus group sessions. This led to a refining of six central threshold concepts for the degree. This in turn informed the revision of a set of programme-wide graduate capabilities. Pre-review course outlines (n=24) and assessments (n=104) were analysed using thematic coding in NVivo and then mapped against the proposed graduate capabilities and thresholds for the revised BHSc. Lecturers validated these data using co-constructed matrices to explore coverage of these thesholds across the programme. At the end of 2014, teaching staff involved in the curriculum project (n=14) completed an evaluation analysing their perception of the effects of applying threshold concepts to their own development, and to their BHSc programme knowledge development. Outcomes: Evaluation results indicate that staff now report a greater common sense of purpose, increased collegiality and a more clarified overarching vision for the BHSc programme (which encompasses at least six distinct pathways of learning within the health sciences). By applying the frame of threshold concepts to the programme curriculum, many staff reported surprise that ‘taken for granted’ competencies such as academic, information and professional literacies were not actually being systematically built upon across the three years of the BHSc. This has been the springboard to a programme-wide redevelopment of the BHSc core courses assisted by external health sector representatives. Additionally, two new complementary ‘capstone’ courses have been planned for stage three of the programme which will more purposefully address real-world, essential graduate capabilities. How the conference sub-themes are addressed (200 words): This poster focuses centrally on conference theme one by exploring how threshold concepts can assist the process of establishing what capabilities are required of (BHSc) graduates and how we can ensure these are responsive to (health) sector needs. It highlights examples from practice in the Bachelor of Health Sciences programme. We first show how an overarching programme purpose was reframed in conjunction with external sector input by utilising Meyer & Land’s notion of threshold concepts. Next we illustrate examples of effective tools and processes (co-constructed matrices) that were applied by academic staff to shed light on gaps and overlaps in existing core course content and assessment tasks. Related to this we address questions from conference theme three concerned with how we can assess, embed and evaluate these graduate capabilities once we have mapped them across our courses. Examples also illustrate the processes utilised in designing stage three ‘capstone’ courses to embed and assess these graduate capabilities.

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  • Investigations At Hi-SEAS into Team Function and Performance on Long Duration Exploration Missions

    Binsted, KA; Basner, M; Bedwell, W; Caldwell, Bryan; Chang, D; Hunter, J; Kozlowski, S; Nasrini, J; Roma, P; Santoro, J; Seibert, M; Shiro, B; Wu, P (2016-02-09)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    HI-SEAS HI-SEAS (Hawaii Space Exploration Analog and Simulation, www.hi-seas.org) is a habitat on an isolated Mars-like site on the Mauna Loa side of the saddle area on the Big Island of Hawaii at approximately 8200 feet above sea level. HI-SEAS is unique, in addition to its setting in a distinctive analog environment, as: - we select the crew to meet our research needs (in contrast, at serendipitous analogs, such as Antarctic stations, crew selection criteria are not controlled by researchers); - the conditions (habitat, mission, communications, etc.) are explicitly designed to be similar to those of a planetary exploration mission; - the site is accessible year round, allowing longer-duration isolated and confined environment studies than at other locations; - the Mars-like environment offers the potential for analog tasks, such as geological field work by human explorers and/or robots. The ability to select crew members to meet research needs and isolate them in a managed simulation performing under specific mission profiles makes HI-SEAS ideal for detailed studies in space-flight crew dynamics, behaviors, roles and performance, especially for long-duration missions. MISSIONS TO DATE As of February 2016, there have been three missions completed at HI-SEAS, two of four months in length, and one of eight months. The fourth mission, which is twelve months long, is currently under way, and will end in August 2016. UPCOMING MISSIONS The next cycle of missions will see the research focus at HI-SEAS shift from crew cohesion and performance to crew composition. We expect the first of three eight-month missions to start in late 2016. CURRENT RESEARCH The current research projects being carried out at HI-SEAS focus on crew cohesion, function and performance. Preliminary results from each of these projects are being presented in detail by the co-authors separately at this meeting. This presentation will provide an overview of the research conducted to date, and the plans for the future. OPPORTUNISTIC RESEARCH In order to maximize research return, and to provide HI-SEAS crews with a realistic workload, we welcome proposals for opportunistic research to be carried out during HI-SEAS missions. Proposed projects must a) advance human space exploration by addressing NASA’s needs and requirements; b) require a long-duration analog for desired research outcomes; and c) not confound the primary research. If you are interested in submitting an opportunistic research proposal, please contact the first author.

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  • The role of conspicuity in bicycle crashes involving a motor vehicle

    Tin Tin, Sandar; Woodward, Alistair; Ameratunga, Shanthi (2014-10-30)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The Effect of Glycosylation on the Potency of Pramlintide, An Anti-Diabetic Drug

    Fletcher, Madeleine; Kowalczyk, Renata; Fairbanks, A; Brimble, Margaret; Hay, DL (2013-12-18)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Who are Today's Dads?

    Underwood, Lisa; Atatoa Carr, P; Berry, S; Grant, Cameron; Morton, Susan (2015-12-14)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Annotation of Clinical Datasets Using openEHR Archetypes

    Zivaljevic, Aleksandar; Atalag, Koray; de Bono, B; Hunter, Peter (2015-02-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Wind power in New Zealand Renewable energy resource dynamics in a hydro-based power system

    Suomalainen, Anna-Kristiina; Pritchard, G; Sharp, Basil; Yuan, Z; Zakeri, G (2013-12-02)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Can we minimize androgen deprivation therapy-related quality of life effects in Māori & Pacific prostate cancer survivors using a genetic stratification?

    Karunasinghe, N; Zhu, Y; Han, Dug; Lange, K; Wang, A; Zhu, Shuotun; Masters, J; Goudie, M; Keogh, J; Benjamin, B; Holmes, M; Ferguson, Lynnette (2015-11-15)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    BACKGROUND: Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is an effective palliation treatment for men with advanced prostate cancer (PC). This is a common treatment received by the majority of PC survivors among New Zealand (NZ) Maori men due to their late presentation of the disease. However, ADT have well documented side effects that could alter the patient’s quality of life (QoL). ADT involves suppression of androgens produced either by the testes or the adrenal gland or both. Adrenal androgen production involves conversion of androstenedione to testosterone by the aldo-keto reductase 1C3 (AKR1C3) enzyme. We have previously reported that the AKR1C3 rs12529 G allele is associated with a lower prostate specific antigen (PSA) level, which is a downstream product of androgens binding to the androgen receptor. The AKR1C3 rs12529 G allele frequency is 14.2% higher among Māori, Pacific and East Asian men compared to Caucasians in our study cohort. Therefore, the current assessment is to evaluate whether genetic stratification with the AKR1C3 rs12529 polymorphism could support decision making on ADT to minimize QoL effects. METHODS: A patient cohort with confirmed clinical diagnoses of PC was recruited with written consent from 2006-2014 to Urology studies carried out at the Auckland Cancer Society Research Centre, University of Auckland, NZ. Recruitment was carried out at hospitals managed under three District Health Boards of Auckland, and private Urology clinics from Waikato District, in NZ. From May 2013, patients were invited to complete a questionnaire that contained options for selecting PC treatment type/s received and a QoL survey. The primary outcomes were the percentage scores under each QoL subscale assessed using the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer quality of life questionnaires (EORTC QLQ-C30 and PR25). Genotyping of these men for the AKR1C3 rs12529 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was carried out using the Sequenom MassArray and iPlex system or the Applied Biosystem’s Taqman SNP genotyping procedure. Age at diagnosis, Gleason score and alcohol consumption were confounding variables between ADT and no ADT groups, and were corrected for subsequent analysis. Analysis of QoL scores were carried out against ADT duration or in association with the AKR1C3 rs12529 SNP using the Generalised Linear Model. P-values <0.02]. This increase among the rs12529 GG genotype (9.7) is therefore, equivalent to 59% of the mean hormone treatment-related symptom score of 16.5 (SD16.6) recorded in this study. INTERPRETATION: As 85.3% ADT recipients have used AA the current study is best interpreted as QoL effects of AAs. This study suggests a possibility for those stratified with the AKR1C3 rs12529 G allele to receive intermittent AA treatment to minimize QoL effects. If larger prospective studies can confirm these findings, PC survivors particularly those of Maori and Pacific ethnic groups may greatly benefit through optimal ADT options not only for their survival benefits, but also to better maintain their QoL.

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  • Visual Acuity, Refractive Status and Accommodation in Octopus Gibbsi

    Tunrbull, P; Backhouse, Simon; Phillips, John (2010-07-27)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • What should be stored in Biobanks? Using computational modelling to unravel genotype to phenotype linkage

    Cooling, Michael; Atalag, Koray (2016-10-31)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The Effects of a Vitamin D, Omega 3, Co-enzyme Q10, Zeaxanthin, Lutein and Astaxanthin Supplement (Lester’s Oil) on Healthy People: Preliminary Results.

    Laing, Bobbi; Ellett, S; Marlow, G; Han, Dug; Jesuthasan, A; Ferguson, Lynnette (2014-08-25)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background: Diet is a key component in the disease susceptibility of individuals. Reducing inflammation especially in people with inflammatory disorders is thought to decrease disease susceptibility. The aim of this trial was to investigate the effects of a dietary supplement which contains Vitamin D, Omega 3, Co-enzyme Q10, Zeaxanthin, Lutein and Astaxanthion inflammatory markers in healthy people. Methods: The cross over trial was double blinded, randomised and placebo controlled. The study population (n = 30) was recruited from Auckland, New Zealand. The intervention or placebo was for 28 days, followed by a washout of 28 days followed by the placebo or intervention for 28 days. In this preliminary analysis blood samples were measured for C-Reactive protein (CRP), HDL, LDL, Triglycerides and cholesterol levels. A quality of life questionnaire, height and weight were also assessed. Results: Analysis of these measures found significant differences between the intervention and placebo groups for CRP (p < 0.0288) HDL (p < 0.0019) and triglycerides (p < 0.0091). Conclusion: In this preliminary analysis the supplement was shown to be effective in reducing key inflammatory markers in healthy people.

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  • Retrospective case-series from a Myopia Control Clinic

    Turnbull, Philip; Phillips, John (2015-10-09)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background: The prevalence of myopia continues to grow, and there are now a number of optical treatment options available to clinicians. However real world clinical data on their effectiveness is sparse. To promote anti-myopia treatments, a specialist Myopia Control Clinic (MCC) opened as a referral clinic at The University of Auckland, New Zealand in 2010, and this is the first comprehensive audit of the clinical outcomes. Case Series: We present a retrospective case series of 110 patients (aged 4 – 33 years, mean: 12.13 ± 4.58 years, 57% female) who attended the MCC between 2010 and 2014. Of these, 56 underwent orthokeratology (OK), 32 wore dual focus soft contact lenses (DFCL), and 22 received advice only. Baseline myopia, vitreous and axial eye length, previous myopia progression, age, number of myopic parents, and gender were not different between OK and DFCL groups at baseline. However, the advice group were older (p = 0.037) and had less previous myopic progression (p = 0.001). Mean follow-up time was 1.30 ± 0.88 and 1.33 ± 0.80 years in OK and SCL groups respectively (p = 0.989). There was a significant reduction in the annualised myopia progression in both treatment groups (OK: -1.17 ± 0.55 to -0.09 ± 017D/yr, p < 0.001, DFCL: -1.15 ± 0.46 to -0.10 ± 0.23D/yr, p < 0.001). There was no difference between OK and DFCL treatment efficacy (p = 0.763), nor in axial or vitreous chamber length changes following treatment (p = 0.184). Only one adverse event was reported over the 4 year period. Conclusions: Contact lenses, whether OK or DFCL, are an effective strategy for targeting myopia progression in children. As there was no difference in the efficacy of the two methods, there are very few barriers in terms of upskilling, chair time, or capital expenditure, for any practitioner to be actively promoting myopia control treatments to at risk groups.

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  • Impact of conjugate pneumococcal vaccine on nasopharyngeal S.pneumoniae serotypes and antibiotic susceptibility over 7 years

    Best, Emma; Taylor, S; Tse, F; McBride, C; Stewart, Joanna; Lennon, Diana; Trenholme, A (2015-03-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • A case of overwhelming sepsis in splenectomised child

    Alkhudairi, Z; Wilson, E; Best, Emma (2015-03-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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