229 results for Conference poster, ResearchSpace@Auckland

  • The Blob - Slicing and dicing in Oracle

    Mustatea, Nicoleta; Jansen, Peter (2007)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    At The University of Auckland Library we successfully tried another approach in demystifying the BLOB: slicing it in Oracle by employing existing functions in Voyager. All we have done is to invoke these functions into our SQL statements and in no time at all we obtain the information we want. We can run these queries in 3 different environments: ???? Oracle???s own SQL+ ???? Microsoft Access (in Pass-through Queries) ???? SQL Server 2000 The advantages of using this approach are: Speed of execution Data extraction is server side therefore independent of Microsoft Access VB. Possibility to schedule the query to run at fixed intervals. (in SQL Server) The simplicity of using what is already in the Voyager database is making this melange of Oracle and SQL server queries not only chic but also efficient.

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  • Diagnostic Utility of a Next Generation Sequencing Retinal Panel in a M??ori and Polynesian population with Inherited Retinal Disease

    Vincent, Andrea; Coysh, A; van Bysterveldt, K; Oliver, Verity; Black, G (2016-05-03)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Characterisation of the Genetic and Hormone controls of Branching in Petunia

    Simons, Joanne; Templeton, K; Plummer, K; Beveridge, C; Snowden, K (2004-09)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Cardiac response to weak electrical shocks challenges the functional syncytium paradigm

    Caldwell, Bryan; Trew, Mark; Pertsov, AM (2015-04-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Wind power in New Zealand Renewable energy resource dynamics in a hydro-based power system

    Suomalainen, Anna-Kristiina; Pritchard, G; Sharp, Basil; Yuan, Z; Zakeri, G (2013-12-02)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Institutional Collaboration around Institutional Repositories

    Hayes, Leonie; Stevenson, Alison; Mason, Ingrid; Scott, Anne; Kennedy, Peter (2007)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Three New Zealand universities have been collaborating on a project to provide open, web-based, access to research outputs through the creation of institutional repositories using the DSpace software. This poster will therefore address the theme of eResearch with particular focus on the benefits of active collaboration, intra-university, inter-university and international, in this area of activity. New Zealand has a small population of 4 million, an innovative and resourceful academic community, a newly implemented research funding model, based on performance (PBRF) and a readiness to stay competitive with the rest of the world. Institutional Repositories in New Zealand are in their infancy but a considerable body of experience already exists overseas which we can draw upon if we work in partnership with those institutions who have already implemented institutional repositories. Funding is limited but by sharing resources and working collaboratively each institution can make substantial progress towards the creation of individual repositories. This poster reports on the joint project between the University of Auckland, the University of Canterbury and Victoria University of Wellington. The three partners have been funded by the New Zealand Tertiary Education Commission to make available, via the Internet for access by Open Archives Initiative (OAI) compliant search engines, research outputs created by staff and students of the three partner institutions. This poster will present information on the work to: ??? Establish DSpace repositories in partner institutions that conform to the OAI-PMH standard. ??? Contribute to the development of linkages with the Australian DEST funded information infrastructure projects, i.e. ADT, APSR and ARROW projects. ??? Identify methods for increasing academic understanding of, and promoting contributions to, digital repositories the content of which is then available to enhance teaching and learning, as well as research. ??? Provide digital materials, either through the deposit of ???born digital??? material or through digitisation of material already available in print, that contribute to the developing digital content landscape as envisaged in the NZ Digital Strategy ??? Contribute to national research resource discovery service to be established by the National Library of New Zealand. Ensure that the content in the project repositories is visible for harvesting by global OAI-compliant search engines such as Google Scholar, OAIster, etc. Collaborate with other IR projects and communicate the lessons learned to the wider tertiary and research communities of New Zealand

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  • CellML: Cellml.org, Tools and Community

    Lawson J.; Lloyd C.; Noble P.; Hunter P.; Nielsen P. (2007)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Poster presented at ICSB2007 The purpose of CellML is to store and exchange computer-based mathematical models of as wide a range of scale and subject as posssible. For example, biochemical signalling and metabolic systems can be embedded in electrophysiological models of excitable cells in CellML. The CellML language is an open standard based on the XML markup language and is being developed by the Bioengineering Institute at the University of Auckland and affiliated research groups [1]. The majority of computational biology publications aim to discuss their model but often fail to provide a comprehensive set of instructions for recreating the model, or include errors preventing reproduction of published model outputs. Publishing a paper with a link to a CellML model facilitates the wide distribution and recreation of that model, and additionally forces the modeller to carefully consider matters such as unit consistency. The CellML specification and application programming interfaces (API) are driven by a core team, but a growing international community is involved in work related to CellML. A community website (www.cellml.org) has been set up as a focal point for the community and also functions as a model repository. A number of groups are developing software tools for CellML and using the language for research in computational biology. A repository of almost 300 unique CellML models is available at www.cellml.org/models: these are computational models from peer-reviewed publications that have been coded into CellML. These models are undergoing an active curation process based on the MIRIAM standard, proposed by the international biological modelling community [2]. This process includes provision of comprehensive documentation, annotation with citation and model author metadata, maintenance of file modification histories, and correspondence with model authors to ensure that models define all required initial conditions and parameters. The CellML community strongly supports collaboration with other groups to continue to set standards for curation and distribution of biological models. A number of free / open source software tools for developing and simulating CellML models are available, including Physiome CellML Environment (PCEnv) and Cellular Open Resource (COR). Other modelling environments such as JSim and Virtual Cell also support the CellML format. Information on further tools such as validators, debuggers and simulation specific packages can be found at www.cellml.org/tools. In the near future, models in the cellml.org model repository will be completely annotated with ontologies such as BioPaX and references to databases such as UniProt. Models will be broken down into the components from which they are comprised, and these components will themselves be curated, providing a toolbox of standardised computational parts from which new models can be created, in an in silico analogy to the MIT Registry of Standard Biological parts (http://parts.mit.edu/registry/index.php/Main_Page). An API has recently been developed for software tools to allow interaction between CellML and SVG diagrams of models, such as biochemical pathway schematics, and work is also underway to standardise graphical representations of CellML models. For more information, please join the CellML community mailing list at http://www.cellml.org/mailman/listinfo/cellml-discussion. 1.) Cuellar, A.A., Lloyd, C. M., Nielsen, P. F., Bullivant, D. P., Nickerson, D. P., Hunter, P. J. "An Overview of CellML 1.1, a Biological Model Description Language" Simulation, 2003, 79, No. 12, 740-747 2.) Le Novere, N., Finney, A., Hucka, M., Bhalla, U.S., Campagne, F., Collado-Vides, J., Crampin, E.J., Halstead, M., Klipp, E., Mendes, P., Nielsen, P., Sauro, H., Shapiro, B., Snoep, J.L., Spence, H.D., Wanner, B.L. "Minium information requested in the annotation of biochemical models (MIRIAM)" Nature Biotechnology, 2005, 23 1509-1515

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  • Can tree weta detect terrestrial bats

    Lomas, Kathryn; Field, LH; Wild, John; Kubke, Maria; Parsons, Stuart (2008-10)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Interactions between insects and bats are well-known examples of predator-prey co-evolution. For example, moths have evolved hearing abilities that allow them to respond to sounds in the ultrasound range, thus enabling them to detect the echolocation calls of hunting bats and perform evasive manoeuvres (Roeder 1998). Although New Zealand insects are preyed upon by endemic bats, no studies have examined whether they possess similar strategies for predator avoidance. If auditory information is used to detect and avoid predation, then the frequencies of greatest sensitivity of the auditory organ are predicted to correspond to the echolocation frequency (or other hunting-related sounds) produced by predatory bats. New Zealand has two endemic bats, the long tailed bat (Chalinolobus tuberculatus) and lesser short tailed bat (Mystacina tuberculata). Long tailed bats are typical aerial insectivores and are not known to prey on weta.

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  • Practice-led curricula: driving from the front or rear seat?

    Adamson, Carole (2009-11-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Do knowledge-driven or practice-led models best serve the needs of social work practitioners engagin

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  • Modelling NFAT Cycling Sensitivity in the Cardiac Myocyte

    Cooling, Michael; Hunter, Peter; Crampin, Edmund (2007-10-01)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The transcription factor NFAT acts as a signal integrator for a number of signal transduction pathways in cardiac myocytes that initiates gene expression in the disease Pathological Cardiac Hypertrophy[1]. Here we develop a quantitative mathematical model of the cytoplasmicnuclear-cytoplasmic cycling of NFAT in response to calcium signals in the cardiac myocyte

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  • Using neuroanatomical imaging to learn about New Zealand's endemic species

    Corfield, Jeremy; Wild, John; Parsons, Stuart; Kubke, Maria (2009-08)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Isolated from the world, New Zealand became a place where birds, in the absence of terrestrial mammals, evolved a diverse assortment of shapes, sizes and behaviours.

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  • Stream Restoration: Getting the microbial ecology right.

    Lewis, Gillian; Lear, Gavin; Turner, Susan; Boothroyd, Ian; Stott, Rebecca; Roberts, Kelly; Ancion, Pierre; Dopheide, Andrew; Washington, Vidya; Knight, Duane; Smith, Joanna (2008-08-17)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    A comprehensive program to re-establish the structure and function of an ecosystem, including its natural diversity and aquatic habitats.

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  • Bacterially mediated manganese deposition in novel "anelli" within the biofilms of an impacted urban stream

    Smith, JP; Lewis, Gillian (2007-12-02)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The purpose of this work is to identify bacteria responsible for the formation of manganese containing anelli within stream biofilms, and study their distribution. Manganese oxidising bacteria are part of a diverse group of organisms found commonly within many disparate environments, which deposit manganese and iron biominerals within biofilms and flocs [1]. The purpose of microbial manganese oxidation is poorly understood, but may be associated with energy production, mobilisation of nutrients, protection and/or detoxification [1, 2]. Manganese has a high sorptive capacity for heavy metals, metalloids, and other ions, as well as a strong oxidizing potential, and therefore frequently induces co-precipitation of cations present within the surrounding environment [1]. Within urban streams contaminants such as heavy metals may therefore potentially be concentrated within steam biofilms in the presence of manganese oxidising bacteria.

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  • A novel implantable blood pressure telemetry device: Comparison between Data Sciences and Telemetry Research systems

    Malpas, Simon; Lim, M; McCormick, John; Kirton, RS; Van Vliet, B; Easteal, Allan; Barrett, Carolyn; Guild, Sarah-Jane; Budgett, David (2008-04-05)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The pending expiry (May 2008) of a Data Sciences (DSI) patent in the area of blood pressure telemetry permits the development of alternative technologies. A key aspect in providing new telemetry systems is a comparison to existing technology. Important aspects include stability of the calibration over time and the ability to capture the pulsitile blood pressure waveform. In a group of 6 rats and 5 rabbits DSI blood pressure transmitters (C40 or D70 models) were implanted in conjunction with Telemetry Research (TR) transmitters. Both systems incorporate a fluid filled catheter of similar dimensions with a biocompatible gel in the tip. The blood pressure waveform was collected via telemetry for up to 2 months after implantation. The signal was sampled at 500 Hz and digitally transmitted to a receiver up to 5 m away The battery of TR transmitter was recharged within the rat using inductive power transfer technology. The pulsitile waveform associated with each heart beat was reflected similarly in all cases although the frequency response of DSI telemeters was limited to ~40 Hz (???3 dB rolloff point). The calibrated offset level between the two transmitters was not more than 5 mmHg at all times over a 2 month period. We conclude that the Telemetry Research blood pressure transmitters offer comparable performance to existing technology but with extra design advantages (rechargeable, co-housing of animals, greater range).

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  • Visualizing multiscale models of the nephron

    Nickerson, David; Terkildsen, J; Hamilton, K; Hunter, Peter (2010-04)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    We present the development of a tool which provides users with the ability to visualize and interact with multiscale models of the nephron ??? from the scale of models of membrane bound proteins, to that of an individual nephron. A 1-D finite element model of the nephron has been created and is used for both visualization and modeling of the tubule transport. Mathematical models of nephron segments (for example, Weinstein et al., Am. J. Physiol. 292:F1164-F1181, 2007 for the proximal tubule) are embedded in the finite element model. At the cellular level these segment models utilize models encoded in CellML (www.cellml.org) to describe cellular transport kinetics. A user interface has been developed which allows the visualization and interaction with the multiscale nephron models and simulation results. The zinc extension to Firefox (http://www.cmiss.org/cmgui/zinc/) is used to provide an interactive 3-D view of the model(s). This model viewer is embedded in a web page which dynamically presents content based on user input. For example, when viewing the whole nephron model the user might be presented with information on the various embedded segment models as they select them in the 3-D model view. Similarly, the user might choose to focus the model viewer on a cellular model in a particular segment in order to view the various membrane transport proteins. Selecting a specific protein might present the user with a full reference description of the mathematical model governing the behavior of that protein (Nickerson et al., Bioinformatics 24:1112-1114, 2008).

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  • A Computational Model For Cerebral Circulation And Its Application For Haemodynamic Modelling In Vascular Surgeries

    Ho, Harvey; Mithraratne, K; Hunter, Peter (2009)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • A Multiscale, Spatially-Distributed Model of Airway Hyper-Responsiveness

    Donovan, Graham; Politi, Antonio; Sneyd, A; Tawhai, Merryn (2009-05)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Rationale: Airway hyper???responsiveness (AHR), along with airway hyper???sensitivity, is a defining feature of asthma, and greater understanding of this emergent phenomenon may lead to better insight into and treatment of the condition. We seek a multiscale, spatially???distributed, mathematical model of the lung to help us understand the role of airway smooth muscle and parenchymal material in AHR. Methods: Our model couples together the organ scale with the tissue scale in the lung in a multiscale approach to the problem. At the organ level, parenchymal tissue is modeled as a compressible Blatz???Ko material in three dimensions, with expansion and recoil of lung tissue due to tidal breathing. The governing equations of finite elasticity deformation are solved using a finite element method. An airway tree is embedded in this tissue, with airway smooth muscle behavior described by a modified Hai???Murphy cross???bridge model (Wang et al., Biophys. J. 94:2008). Each airway segment is initially assumed to be radially symmetric and longitudinally stiff, and thus the embedded airway tree is essentially 1D. Results: Our spatially???distributed, multiscale model yields organ???level observations while incorporating tissue???level modeling detail. Preliminary results from the integrated model indicate potential use in the study of many phenomena associated with asthmatic AHR, including spatial distribution of ventilation defects, patchiness, and effects of deep inspirations.

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  • Mitochondrial Respiration in Skeletal Muscle of Obese Women Prior To Bariatric Surgery and Following Six Months of Weight Loss

    MacDonald, J; McGill, Anne-Thea; Hickey, A; Plank, L; McLeod, B; Falk, S; Wiessing, K; Beban, G; Chan, YK; Xin, Liping; Cooper, GJS; Poppitt, SD (2010-07-12)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Impact of PCV7 on antibiotic susceptibiity of nasophayngeal Streptococcus pneumoniae in South Auckland children

    Sekikawa, E; Trenholme, A; Taylor, S; Lennon, Diana; McBride, C; Best, Emma (2011-03-17)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Cell proliferative and radioprotective properties of bioactive Salvia sclareoides extracts

    Ruivo, D; Silva, FVM; Rauter, AP; Justino, J; Goulart, M (2008-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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