225 results for Conference poster, All rights reserved

  • Resources and strategies used in New Zealand community pharmacies to identify and assist patients with low literacy: An opportunity to improve health outcomes

    Aspden, Trudi; Sheridan, Jane; McKie, J (2011)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Patients with lower literacy generally have less knowledge of health services, poorer health outcomes' and are more likely to have difficulty understanding prescription medication warning labels. To determine how pharmacy staff identify patients with limited literacy skills, the strategies used for identification, the resources available to help patients with low literacy and opportunities for up skilling. A questionnaire was adapted from one developed by Praska et al 20053. A random sample of 120 New Zealand pharmacies were sent information about the study. Those pharmacists willing to participate were interviewed by telephone. ....

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  • Targeting synthetic glycopeptides to MGL on Dermal Dendritic cells

    McIntosh, Julie; Angel, CE; Chen, CJJ; Manning, K; Mansell, Claudia; Agrawai, S; Harris, Paul; Williams, Geoffrey; Squire, Christopher; Brimble, Margaret; Dunbar, Peter (2011-02-14)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The ability of a peptide vaccine to stimulate T cells in vivo might be improved by specifically targeting the peptide to dendritic cells (DC). The C-type lectin Macrophage Galactose-type lectin, MGL (CD301), has been shown to bind to N-acetyl-galactosamine (GalNAc) and small peptides bearing O-linked GalNAc. Synthetic GalNAc can be produced using relatively simple organic chemistry when compared with the complicated branched sugars that are recognised by other C-type lectins. MGL therefore represents a promising target for the design of synthetic peptide vaccines. We have identified that antigen-presenting cells in human skin express MGL and have confirmed that CD14+ dermal DCs might be targeted via MGL. The intracellular fate of MGL following internalisation was tracked by confocal microscopy. MGL traffics through early endosomes to late endosomes/lysosomes, and colocalises with MHC class I and class II. Synthetic glycopeptides were produced incorporating either native O-linked GalNAc or GalNAc residues linked to the peptide chain via non-native “Click” chemistry. Biophysical analysis of the ability of both “Click” and native glycopeptides peptides with recombinant MGL confirmed the ability of both these peptides to bind MGL. Ongoing work aims to determine whether targeting to MGL using these synthetic peptides results in efficient presentation of antigen to T cells.

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  • Managing inpatient hypoglycaemia: A clinical audit

    Coats, A; Marshall, Dianne (2010-09-10)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Aim To examine nursing management of hypoglycaemic episodes in the hospitalised adult patient with Type 1 or Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in the general medical/surgical wards at a secondary level hospital. Objective To describe hypoglycaemia treatment patterns in the adult inpatient by examining nursing adherence to the Northland District Health Board hospital hypoglycaemia protocol. Method A retrospective audit of 32 sets of treatment and progress notes identified nurses’ adherence to the protocol for management of inpatient hypoglycaemia . Results Adherence to the individual steps of the protocol was low. Nurses administered the recommended initial treatment in 40.4% of cases. Within 30 minutes of detection, 36.7% episodes were corrected. Medical staff were informed of hypoglycaemia in 11.4% of cases. This step achieved the lowest adherence. Nurses documented 87.7% of episodes. There was a high degree of recurrent hypoglycaemia (71.9%). Discussion It is critical to patient outcomes that the steps of the protocol are undertaken correctly. Failure to provide the recommended treatment resulted in some patients experiencing prolonged episodes. Whilst frequency of nursing documentation of episodes was high, critical assessment of causes and or a management plan were not routinely documented. Nurses did not routinely advise medical staff of episodes, consequently medical review of causes of hypoglycaemia and the management plan occurred infrequently. Failure to review management contributed to the high number of recurrent episodes.

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  • Islet human amylin oligomer formation is differentially correlated with β-cell death and diabetes onset between homozygous and hemizygous human amylin transgenic mice

    Zhang, S; Liu, H; Li, XL; Au, M; Chuang, CL; Cooper, GJS (2010)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    One of the pathological features of type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is the presence of islet amyloid deposits comprising mainly human amylin (hA)/hIAPP. Recent studies suggested that soluble oligomers of human amylin may be the primary cause of β-cell damage and thus contribute to the onset/development of T2DM. However, the molecular basis of this process remains to be fully elucidated. We aimed to investigate the connection between soluble oligomers and hA cytotoxicity, and their correlation with diabetes development using a rodent model of diabetes.

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  • Aged Residential Care Health Utilisation Study (ARCHUS). A randomised controlled trial to reduce acute hospitalisations from residential aged care.

    Broad, J.B; Foster, Susan; Boyd, M.; Kerse, N.; Lumley, T.; Connolly, M.J. (2011)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background and Aim Our aim is to reduce avoidable acute hospitalisations of residents of long-term care facilities. Such hospitalisations can cause distress, disruption, and complications for residents. Some conditions have been identified as better managed in the facility providing supports are in place. A randomised controlled trial is underway in Auckland, New Zealand of a targeted, multi-disciplinary team (MDT) to up-skill facility staff. We here outline the study design. Design Clustered randomised controlled trial (~1400 residents) of long-term care facilities, stratified by district health board (DHB). Randomisation and interventions commenced March 2011. Facilities certified for long-term care of older people in greater Auckland are eligible for selection if they have high levels of avoidable hospitalisation. Intervention MDTs supporting facility staff to provide evidence-based care. The supports and services provided comprise an initial stock-take assessment and development of facility plan, direct access to a geriatrician and gerontology nurse specialist (GNS), MDT meetings for individual cases, and provision of targeted education to facility nurses/caregivers, facilitated by a GNS. Education topics are based on modelling of risk factors for avoidable hospitalisation from long-term care in Auckland (2008-2010) and include recognition of illness, wound care, care planning, end-stage dementia care, nutrition/dehydration, family communication, specific clinical coaching with high-risk residents, role modelling of clinical reasoning processes, and provision of benchmarking systems. Control Usual care: the quality assurance, supports, and services routinely provided by the DHB Endpoints Primary endpoints include rate of hospitalisations in which the admission diagnosis code is one of a set pre-identified as being potentially avoidable (“Ambulatory Sensitive Hospitalisations”), emergency admission hospital bed days, and all-cause mortality. Secondary endpoints include number of emergency department presentations and number and type of medications prescribed. Residents’ outcomes will be tracked for 12 months from randomisation using their unique national health identifiers (NHIs).

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  • Inhibition of complement by Staphylococcal superantigen-like protein 7 in vitro and in vivo

    Lorenz, Natalie; Fraser, John; Radcliff, F (2010-12-07)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • In vivo and in vitro assessment of the action of the antitumour benzonaphthyridine derivative SN 28049 on the murine Colon 38

    Chen, Ying; Finlay, GJ; Richardson, E; Baguley, BC (2010-05)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    SN 28049 a new DNA binding benzonaphthyridine derivative targeting the topoisomerase II enzyme is curative against the murine Co38 adenocarcinoma, whereas another agent targeting the same enzyme, etoposide, is relatively ineffective against this tumour.

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  • Role of Antioxidants and Polyphenols in the Stability of Sauvignon Blanc Aromas

    Herbst, M; Kilmartin, PA; Nicolau, L (2006-02)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Prolonged Exposure to S-Adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) Perturbs Adipocyte Biology

    Ngo, Sherry; Roberts, R; Castro, L; Bhoothpoor, C; Gluckman, P; Sheppard, A (2011-06)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Preclinical characterization of PWT33597, a dual inhibitor of PI3-kinase alpha and mTOR.

    Matthews, DJ; O’Farrell, M; James, J; Giddens, Anna; Rewcastle, Gordon; Denny, William (2011-04-05)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    4485: Phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) is an important mediator of tumor cell growth, survival and proliferation. In particular, PI3K alpha is important for signaling downstream of receptor tyrosine kinases and is also frequently amplified or mutationally activated in tumors, suggesting that selective inhibitors of this isoform may have therapeutic utility in the treatment of cancer. Downstream of PI3K, the mTOR kinase also plays a critical role in cellular growth and metabolism, and inhibitors of mTOR have demonstrated clinical benefit in several tumor types. We report here the discovery and characterization of PWT33597, a dual inhibitor of PI3K alpha and mTOR. PWT33597 inhibits PI3K alpha and mTOR in biochemical assays with IC50 values of 19 and 14 nM respectively, and is approximately 10-fold selective with respect to PI3K gamma and PI3K delta. Profiling of PWT33597 against 442 protein kinases (Ambit Kinomescan) revealed little or no cross-reactivity with either serine/threonine or tyrosine kinases, and there was little cross-reactivity with an additional panel of 64 pharmacologically relevant targets. In NCI-H460 and HCT116 tumor cells with mutationally activated PI3K alpha, PWT33597 inhibits phosphorylation of PI3K and mTOR pathway proteins with cellular IC50 values similar to its biochemical IC50 values. PWT33597 has good pharmacokinetic properties in multiple preclinical species, is not extensively metabolized in vivo and shows little potential for interaction with cytochrome P450 enzymes. Following a single oral dose in vivo, PWT33597 shows durable inhibition of PI3K and mTOR pathway signaling in xenograft tumors. High compound distribution into tumors and potent anti-tumor activity has been observed in multiple tumor xenograft models with activated PI3K/mTOR pathways. Also, administration of PWT33597 in mice is associated with transient increases in plasma insulin, consistent with an effect on PI3K/AKT signaling. A robust PK/PD relationship has been defined, which will guide interpretation of the planned phase I clinical study. IND-enabling studies with PWT33597 are currently in progress.

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  • Using Sampling to Dynamically Reconfigure Problem-Solvers

    Franco, S; Barley, Michael (2008-07-13)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The time it takes a program to solve a particular problem depends heavily upon the choice of problem solving method, the data representation, heuristics etc. The specific choices can have a dramatic impact on performance. This research aims to produce a formula based on these design decisions and problem characteristics which predicts how long the problem will run until a solution is found. As means to this end we are working on a prototype problem solving method which dynamically adapts its search configuration in order to speed up finding a solution.

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  • "But what about the theory?" Designing a social work curriculum around practice learning and reflection

    Adamson, Carole; Bellinger, A (2010-06-10)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Curriculum design in an academic context operates within a site of tension characterised by the need

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  • The student nurse integrated team model:barriers and benefits

    Aspinall, Cathleen; Baker, H; Vallant, S; Spence, D (2010-11-05)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The student nurse integrated team model:barriers and benefits Intent. The purpose of this research was to evaluate a collaborative project to implement an integrated team model of learning in practice with the clinical placement provider for second year Bachelor of Nursing students from the University of Auckland and Auckland University of Technology. Description. Our clinical partner put forward a proposal to change the model of working with undergraduate student nurses in the clinical environment .The aim was to improve the student’s integration into nursing teams and also strengthen their model of team nursing. The World Health Organisation (WHO 2009) identified that the role individuals play within a team influences team effectiveness and therefore impacts on the quality of patient safety. From a University perspective this involved changing the role of the academic lecturer from working alongside the student to supporting the registered nurses. In their role as mentors, the nurses would assist with the integration of theory into practice and teach clinical skills at the bedside. A perceived benefit would be the emersion of second year student nurses into the ward team. The student nurse integrated team model was devised based on a mentorship concept and piloted in the medical and surgical areas of the public hospital. This study evaluated the model from both the University and the ADHB perspective using a mixed methodology.The University of Auckland surveyed students, university lecturers, charge nurses, staff nurse mentors and clinical nurse educators.The Auckland University of Technology held focus groups with the same participants. It was anticipated that this method would provide hard data for evaluation and qualitative information to explore the experience. The introduction of a new way of working in reality meant a change of role for university and clinical staff. Furthermore, the success of the project as with any change initiative, was dependent on a number of stakeholders. Evaluation Both qualitative and quantitative research methods were used in the evaluation of this new way of working, the process and results will be shared at the conference. Bibliography includes but not limited to the following: Flin, R. Winter, J. Sarac, and C. & Raduma, M. (2009) .Human factors in patient safety: Review of tools and topics. Geneva: World Health Organization.

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  • Molecular mechanisms of human T cell differentiation - a role for DNA methylation

    Sheppard, Hilary; Brooks, Anna; Dunbar, PR (2009-09-01)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The differentiation state of CD8+ T cells is an important determinant of their ability to eradicate tumours and infection; progressive differentiation appears to lead to a decreased upregulated suggesting an indirect mechanism underlie T cell differentiation. Several key cell surface markers are down regulated as differentiation progresses see Fig. 1). We have found that promoter DNA methylation is one mechanism involved in the down regulation of these genes This suggests that manipulation of DNA methylation of key genes could be used to improve the survival and function of CD8+ T cells.

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  • Examination of miRNAs involved in programming human T cells

    Sheppard, Hilary; Feisst, Vaughan; Brooks, Anna; Dunbar, R (2011-09)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The differentiation state of CD8+ T cells is an important determinant of their ability to eradicate tumours and infection; progressive differentiation appears to lead to a decreased effectiveness. Therefore the development of effective immunotherapies depends on a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie T cell differentiation. Several key cell surface markers are down regulated as differentiation progresses so we can define CD8+ T cells into 4 main subsets (see Fig. 1). Each subset is generated by a specific transcriptional programme. Our hypothesis is that miRNAs are important in this process of T cell differentation. If you take a cancer patient’s cells, expand in vitro, and re-infuse to the patient, the phenotype of the T cell will determine its efficacy in vivo. We have found that we can pre-condition T cells using the cytokine IL21 to have a more favourable phenotype than using the traditionally used cytokine IL2 (data not shown). We aim to explore this cytokine driven differentiation process by examining the miRNAs involved.

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  • A Structure-Based Model Analysis Of Ventilation And Contrast Gas Distribution In The Ovine Lung

    Mitchell, JH; Hoffman, EA; Mitchell, Jennine (2011-05-23)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Rationale: Sheep are increasingly used as a model for human ventilation, however there are substantive anatomical differences between human and ovine lungs that may affect the gravitational distribution of tissue at rest and during ventilation. Understanding ventilation and gas transport in the ovine lung is important for interpreting measurements acquired via in vivo gas contrast imaging, such as xenon enhanced computed tomography (Xe-CT). In this study a computational model that integrates finite elastic deformation of the soft tissue with distribution of inspired air was applied to the ovine lung to determine whether a model that is consistent with human ventilation and gas distribution in also suitable for the simulation of ventilation in experimental animals. Methods: Xe-CT imaging was acquired in three sheep at the University of Iowa Division of Physiologic Imaging. Image based finite element meshes were constructed for each lung and the airway tree at a positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) of 25 cmH 20 in prone and supine postures. Ventilation and gas transport were simulated for each animal using a computational model that includes finite deformation elasticity to define the pressure volume relationship of the lung, and time-dependent advective and diffusive transport of inhaled Xe gas. Gravitational deformation was simulated prone and supine, and ventilation was simulated for the prone lung. The specific volume change predicted from the advective flow simulation was compared to specific ventilation calculated using the time constant method that is used in Xe-CT analysis. Results: The finite deformation model accurately predicts the regional tissue density in prone but underestimates the supine gradient. Ventilation simulated in the prone posture for each of the three animals indicates that the ventilation distribution predicted by an advective flow model typically differs from that predicted from the time constant method of analysis. The R 2 correlations between the simulations and time constant calculations were 0.7824, 0.3423 and 0.42881 for each of the three animals. Conclusions: The human-consistent model is inadequate for predicting ventilation in supine sheep, because the model does not include movement of the heart or fluid shifts that were evident in the imaging. However the model is sufficiently predictive for the prone ovine lung. That advective ventilation differs from inert gas transport is consistent with experimental findings that show a correlation of R 2 of 0.66 between specific volume and ventilation calculated from tracer gas mixing (1). Fuld et al (2008) J. Appl. Physiol 104:1174-1184 This abstract is funded by: NIH Grant ROI-HL-064368-06A1

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  • What Does My Grade Mean?: Differing Assessment Models in Chemistry.

    Salter, David (2009-06)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Determining whether students have learnt what was intended is a crucial aspect of every course. How this is done and what the outcome shows can however vary greatly. Traditionally in New Zealand, tertiary students’ academic ability is assessed using methods that allow for discrimination between students through norm-referencing, typically producing a single cumulative percentage value which is translated into a letter grade. In contrast, the Government-mandated system for assessing secondary school students in New Zealand is based on a model of criterion-referenced assessment that aims to describe students’ current level of performance with reference to specific performance criteria which are derived from national curriculum statements. Consequently, in progressing from secondary to tertiary education in New Zealand, students experience a major change in the assessment of their performance from being independent of others to being relative to others. A comparison of these two assessment systems used in New Zealand will be presented as well as a description of how standards-based assessment is being introduced into several first-year tertiary chemistry courses as a way to better indicate students’ current capabilities and assist students in the transition between secondary and tertiary education.

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  • Impact of grape harvesting on varietal thiols in Sauvignon blanc wines

    Allen, T; Herbst-Johnstone, Mandy; Girault, M; Butler, P; Logan, G; Jouanneau, S; Nicolau, L; Kilmartin, PA (2012-02-03)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Resources and strategies used in New Zealand community pharmacies to identify and assist patients with low literacy: An opportunity to improve health outcomes.

    Aspden, Trudi; Sheridan, JL; McKie, J (2011)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background: Patients with lower literacy generally have less knowledge of health services, poorer health outcomes[1] and are more likely to have difficulty understanding prescription medication warning labels[2]. Objectives: To determine how pharmacy staff identify patients with limited literacy skills, the strategies used for identification, the resources available to help patients with low literacy and opportunities for upskilling. Methodology: A questionnaire was adapted from one developed by Praska et al 2005 [3]. A random sample of 120 New Zealand pharmacies were sent information about the study. Those pharmacists willing to participate were interviewed by telephone. Results: The response rate was 64% (n=77). Almost 38% of respondents reported that they used measures to identify patients with low literacy, most often during patient counselling. The most common strategy used to optimise the health care of patients with low literacy was spending extra time explaining the information. Written information in the form of Self Care cards and information leaflets was the resource most commonly available. However, 4% of respondents had no resources available in their pharmacy.

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  • Educating for disaster: Determining the core elements of a disaster curriculum for social work in New Zealand

    Adamson, Carole (2012)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    In 2010 and 2011, Aotearoa New Zealand was hit by a number of major disasters involving loss of human life and severe disruption to social, ecological and economic wellbeing. The Pike River mine explosions were closely followed by a sequence of major earthquakes in Christchurch, seismic events that have permanently altered the lives of thousands of people in our third largest city, the closure of the central business district and the effective abandonment of whole residential areas. In early October 2011, the ship, Rena, grounded on a reef off the port of Tauranga and threatened a major oil spill throughout the Bay of Plenty, where local communities with spiritual and cultural connections to the land depend on sea food as well as thrive on tourism. The Council for Social Work Education Aotearoa New Zealand (CSWEANZ), representing all the Schools of Social Work in New Zealand, held a ‘Disaster Curriculum’ day in November 2011, at which social workers and Civil Defence leaders involved in the Christchurch earthquakes, the Rena Disaster, Fiji floods and the Boxing Day tsunami presented their narrative experience of disaster response and recovery. Workshops discussed and identified core elements that participants considered vital to a social work curriculum that would enable social work graduates in a range of community and cultural settings to respond in safe, creative and informed ways. We present our core ideas for a social work disaster curriculum and consider a wide range of educational content based on existing knowledge bases and new content within a disaster framework.

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