6 results for Conference poster, Modify

  • Coronary artery bifurcation haemodynamics - comparison between phase contrast MRI and computational fluid dynamics

    Beier, Susann; Ormiston, J; Webster, M; Cater, John; Medrano-Garcia, P; Young, Alistair; Cowan, Brett (2014-01-17)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Coronary atherosclerosis is common at vessel bifurcations. A quantitative approach to measuring blood velocity, vorticity and more complex flow features at bifurcations would enhance the understanding of the mechanisms of atheroma development, and potentially predict vessels at highest risk. The aim of this work was to validate 4D phase contrast (PC) magnetic resonance imaging flow measurements using a simplified arterial model of the left main coronary bifurcation against computational fluid dynamic (CFD) modelling.

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  • Institutional Collaboration around Institutional Repositories

    Hayes, Leonie; Stevenson, Alison; Mason, Ingrid; Scott, Anne; Kennedy, Peter (2007)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Three New Zealand universities have been collaborating on a project to provide open, web-based, access to research outputs through the creation of institutional repositories using the DSpace software. This poster will therefore address the theme of eResearch with particular focus on the benefits of active collaboration, intra-university, inter-university and international, in this area of activity. New Zealand has a small population of 4 million, an innovative and resourceful academic community, a newly implemented research funding model, based on performance (PBRF) and a readiness to stay competitive with the rest of the world. Institutional Repositories in New Zealand are in their infancy but a considerable body of experience already exists overseas which we can draw upon if we work in partnership with those institutions who have already implemented institutional repositories. Funding is limited but by sharing resources and working collaboratively each institution can make substantial progress towards the creation of individual repositories. This poster reports on the joint project between the University of Auckland, the University of Canterbury and Victoria University of Wellington. The three partners have been funded by the New Zealand Tertiary Education Commission to make available, via the Internet for access by Open Archives Initiative (OAI) compliant search engines, research outputs created by staff and students of the three partner institutions. This poster will present information on the work to: • Establish DSpace repositories in partner institutions that conform to the OAI-PMH standard. • Contribute to the development of linkages with the Australian DEST funded information infrastructure projects, i.e. ADT, APSR and ARROW projects. • Identify methods for increasing academic understanding of, and promoting contributions to, digital repositories the content of which is then available to enhance teaching and learning, as well as research. • Provide digital materials, either through the deposit of “born digital” material or through digitisation of material already available in print, that contribute to the developing digital content landscape as envisaged in the NZ Digital Strategy • Contribute to national research resource discovery service to be established by the National Library of New Zealand. Ensure that the content in the project repositories is visible for harvesting by global OAI-compliant search engines such as Google Scholar, OAIster, etc. Collaborate with other IR projects and communicate the lessons learned to the wider tertiary and research communities of New Zealand

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  • ResearchSpace@Auckland : Disaster Recovery (DR)

    Latt, Yin Yin; Hayes, Leonie (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The University of Auckland Library and Information Technology Services have partnered to provide a DSpace installation utilising a mature IT infrastructure. The application is hosted on the University of Auckland’s virtual server cluster in the recently completed “City Data Centre” along with other enterprise systems. ResearchSpace is operational 24x7 and has a Disaster Recovery mirror located at a second location. Handle identifiers are maintained between the two systems to ensure users can submit items at all times.

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  • Getting Research 'Out There': ResearchSpace@Auckland

    Newton-Wade, Vanessa; Laurie, John; Hayes, Leonie (2007)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    A key part of the academic research process is publishing the results – ‘getting it out there’. An institutional repository such as ResearchSpace@Auckland provides authors with a channel for near-instantaneous worldwide dissemination of research. ResearchSpace@Auckland has been developed at the University of Auckland under the umbrella of the Institutional Repositories Aotearoa Project (Ira). Built using DSpace Open Source Software, the repository contains ‘research outputs’ from the University of Auckland’s staff and students, including theses, papers and reports. The PhD thesis collection is the flagship of the repository – electronic submission is compulsory for all completing PhD students from 2011. The initial 200 items in the PhD thesis collection were gathered by contacting authors of theses submitted at the University of Auckland since 2001 and inviting them to submit digital copies and consent forms. Trials are underway to digitize theses that are unavailable in digital format. The mandating of compulsory submission for PhD theses submitted at the University of Auckland ensures regulatory requirements for digital deposit are catered for. Other collections for articles, papers, and images are being developed.

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  • Registry of BioBricks models using CellML

    Rouilly, Vincent; Canton, Barry; Nielsen, Poul; Kitney, Richard (2007)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. One of the main goals in Synthetic Biology is to assess the feasibility of building novel biological systems from interchangeable and standardized parts. In order to collect and share parts, a Registry of standardized DNA BioBricks http://parts.mit.edu/registry has been established at the MIT. BioBricks can be assembled to form devices and systems to operate in living cells. Design of reliable devices and systems would benefit from accurate models of system function. To predict the function of systems built from many parts, we need to have accurate models for the parts and mechanisms to easily compose those part models into a system model. Therefore, in parallel to increasing the number of parts available and characterising them experimentally, a logical extension to the Registry would be to build a Registry of BioBrick models to complement the physical parts.

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  • Giving research global reach: ResearchSpace@Auckland

    Newton-Wade, Vanessa; Hayes, Leonie (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    A key part of the academic research process is publishing the results – ‘getting it out there’. An institutional repository such as ResearchSpace@Auckland provides authors with a channel for near-instantaneous worldwide dissemination of research. ResearchSpace@Auckland at the University of Auckland was initially developed under the umbrella of the Institutional Repositories Aotearoa (Ira) Project. The project between Auckland, Canterbury and Victoria Universities used DSpace Open Source Software and was funded by the Tertiary Education Commission (TEC). The project was completed in 2007. ResearchSpace is now a full production system with seamless Disaster Recovery ability, which allows authors to submit their work confident that it will be secure. ResearchSpace contains ‘research outputs’ from the University of Auckland’s staff and students, including theses, papers and reports. From 2007 it is a requirement for all enrolling PhD students to submit a digital copy of their thesis upon completion. The PhD collection has grown from an initial 200 items at the beginning of 2007 to nearly 1700 items. 775 of these are open-access. This has been achieved via a retrospective digitization project for all PhD theses and a campaign to contact the authors for permission. Key features of ResearchSpace • Authors submit their own content initially (self-submission), administrators check content and publish it online • Most content is freely available to any user – use is not restricted to members of the institution or subscribers • Durable & Permanent URLs: we use ‘Handles’. e.g. http://hdl.handle.net/2292/1430. A handle does not have the institution’s domain name in the URL, if the website is changed or moved, the URL will still go to the correct location. • Preservation: creating digital files allows creation of a new print copy if necessary. Thesis files are in Portable Document Format (PDF), and the library has undertaken to keep the formats up to date, as technology may change in the future.

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