52 results for Conference poster, Modify

  • The South Island Velocity Model (SIVM) - Version 1: Computational implementation and Integration within the Unified Community Velocity Model (UCVM) framework

    Thomson, Ethan; Bradley, Brendon; Lee, Robin L. (2016)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    This poster presents the computational implementation of the South Island Velocity Model (SIVM) Version 1, constructed for use in physics-based ground motion simulation. A planned integration of the SIVM within the Unified Community Velocity Model (UCVM) framework is presented which will allow researchers to generate velocity models for use in ground motion simulations using standardized approaches. The SIVM allows any fault rupture located in the South Island to be simulated. Figure 4 illustrates the results of ground motion simulations for three rupture scenarios of the Alpine Fault.

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  • Public Perception of Earthquake Risks & Retrofitting of Heritage Buildings

    Yakubu, I.E.; Egbelakin, T.; Park, K.; Phipps, R. (2016)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    This study aims to examine the public perception of earthquake risks and retrofitting of heritage buildings in New Zealand. In doing so, the study will seek: a. To examine the perception of the public concerning their earthquake safety in heritage buildings; b. To determine the level of value that the public attach to heritage buildings; c. To ascertain public preparedness in accepting a lower level of earthquake safety in order to retain heritage buildings; d. To examine how the public perception on earthquake occurrences, cultural values, and heritage preservation impact the degree of adoption of a nationally consistent approach that will address the risks posed by earthquakes and retrofitting of heritage buildings; e. To identify other attributes besides heritage where the public is prepared to accept a greater earthquake risk.

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  • Horizontal-Vertical Coupling of a Building Frame System in Shake Table Testing to 3D Motions

    Guzman-Pujols, Jean; Ryan, Keri (2016)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    A large-scale, shake-table test program was conducted with a goal to promote rapid spread of base isolation systems in Japan and the U.S. A small steel frame building with and without base isolation was subjected to 2D and 3D shaking at E-Defense. Coupling of the horizontal and vertical response as well as high intensity slab vibration contributed to nonstructural damage in the building. Strong coupling in a configuration with triple pendulum bearings (TPB) was shown to result from the friction mechanism in the bearings. However, the source of coupling in a configuration with a hybrid isolation system (lead rubber bearings or LRB and cross-linear rolling bearings) and the fixed-base building configuration has not yet been explained.

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  • Simulation of site amplification effects at Heathcote Valley during the 2010-2011 Canterbury earthquakes

    Jeong, Seokho; Bradley, Brendon (2016)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    Heathcote Valley school strong motion station (HVSC) consistently recorded ground motions with higher intensities than nearby stations during the 2010-2011 Canterbury earthquakes. For example, as shown in Figure 1, for the 22 February 2011 Christchurch earthquake, peak ground acceleration at HVSC reached 1.4 g (horizontal) and 2 g (vertical), the largest ever recorded in New Zealand. Strong amplification of ground motions is expected at Heathcote Valley due to: 1) the high impedance contrast at the soil-rock interface, and 2) the interference of incident and surface waves within the valley. However, both conventional empirical ground motion prediction equations (GMPE) and the physics-based large scale ground motions simulations (with empirical site response) are ineffective in predicting such amplification due to their respective inherent limitations.

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  • Hybrid Broadband Ground Motion Simulations of Porters Pass Earthquakes

    Nazer, M. Ahsan; Bradley, Brendon; Razafindrakoto, Hoby (2016)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    We present ground motion simulations of the Porters Pass (PP) fault in the Canterbury region of New Zealand; a major active source near Christchurch city. The active segment of the PP fault has an inferred length of 82 km and a mostly strike-slip sense of movement. The PP fault slip makes up approximately 10% of the total 37 mm/yr margin-parallel plate motion and also comprises a significant proportion of the total strain budget in regional tectonics. Given that the closest segment of the fault is less than 45 km from Christchurch city, the PP fault is crucial for accurate earthquake hazard assessment for this major population centre. We have employed the hybrid simulation methodology of Graves and Pitarka (2010, 2015), which combines low (f1 Hz) frequencies into a broadband spectrum. We have used validations from three moderate magnitude events (??4.6 Sept 04, 2010; ??4.6 Nov 06, 2010; ??4.9 Apr 29, 2011) to build confidence for the ?? > 7 PP simulations. Thus far, our simulations include multiple rupture scenarios which test the impacts of hypocentre location and the finite-fault stochastic rupture representation of the source itself. In particular, we have identified the need to use location-specific 1D ??/?? models for the high frequency part of the simulations to better match observations.

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  • Guidance on the utilisation of ground motion simulations in engineering practice

    Bradley, Brendon; Pettinga, Didier; Baker, Jack W. (2016)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    This poster presents ongoing work to develop guidance on the utilization of ground motion simulations for engineering practice. The two central ideas in the guidance are, firstly, the indended use of the simulations: For hazard analysis and/or providing ground motion records for use in seismic response analysis of engineered structures. Secondly, a heriarichal validation matrix to systematically develop predictive confidence in the simulated motions in generic regions through to site-specific applications. There are two principal manners in which simulated ground motions can be utilized: In determination of the seismic hazard: Most rigorously, the seismic hazard would be directly obtained from ground motion simulation-based PSHA (e.g. CyberShake). Alternatively, simulations can inform the functional form in empirical ground motion models. Ground motions for seismic response analysis: Simulated ground motions can supplement existing empirical (as-recorded) ground motion databases (e.g. for large Mwsmall Rrup cases which are poorly represented). Target amplitudes can be defined from traditional or simulation-based PSHA, or a code-based response spectrum.

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  • A Case Study of Successful Performance of Retrofitted Masonry Substations

    Misnon, Noor Aina; Dizhur, Dmytro; Mackenzie, John; Fikri, Rijalul; Abeling, Shannon; Ingham, Jason (2016)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    Since the mid 1990s, the Christchurch inventory of substation buildings was seismically retrofitted as part of the Risk and Realities improvement programme. • The substation buildings were retrofitted using a system of simple and cost-effective steel elements. • The 2010/2011 Canterbury earthquakes caused significant immediate disruption to power distribution network in Christchurch. • It took a single day in September 2010 and ten days in February 2011 to restore power to 90% customers. Tostudytheseismicperformanceofmasonrysubstationbuildingsfromamulti-disciplinary perspective on structural,economic and social aspects.

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  • Dynamic Characterisation of Central Auckland Reclamation Zones

    Lee, Kuanjin; Wotherspoon, Liam (2016)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    The aim of this project was to define the dynamic characteristics of the reclaimed land in the Auckland CBD using a combination of geotechnical, geological and geophysical data. The objectives were: 1. Understand the history of reclamation and sub-surface geology from historical ground investigations to provide constraints for the surface wave testing. 2. Define the shear wave velocity of the deposits in the reclamation zones. 3. Define a range of site classification metrics across the region.

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  • Geologic and geomorphic influence on the spatial extent of lateral spreading in Christchurch, New Zealand

    van Ballegooy, S.; Bastin, Sarah; Cubrinovski, Misko (2016)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    Liquefaction-induced lateral spreading during earthquakes poses a significant hazard to the built environment, as observed in Christchurch during the 2010 to 2011 Canterbury Earthquake Sequence (CES). It is critical that geotechnical earthquake engineers are able to adequately predict both the spatial extent of lateral spreads and magnitudes of associated ground movements for design purposes. Published empirical and semi-empirical models for predicting lateral spread displacements have been shown to vary by a factor of 2 from those measured in parts of Christchurch during CES. Comprehensive post- CES lateral spreading studies have clearly indicated that the spatial distribution of the horizontal displacements and extent of lateral spreading along the Avon River in eastern Christchurch were strongly influenced by geologic, stratigraphic and topographic features.

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  • Whakatane liquefaction case history from the 1987 Edgecumbe Earthquake

    Bastin, Sarah; van Ballegooy, Sjoerd; Mellsop, Nick; Wotherspoon, Liam; Orense, Rolando; Pender, Michael (2016)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    Liquefaction and associated lateral spreading during the 1987 ML 6.3 Edgecumbe earthquake caused severe damage within parts of the Whakatane township in the North Island of New Zealand. Liquefaction and lateral spreading was well documented proximal to the waterways in areas underlain by recent fluvial and marine sediments. Recent studies utilizing an extensive set of CPT investigations indicate that much of the Whakatane CBD is underlain by sediments with a low cyclic resistance to liquefaction. No evidence of liquefaction was observed within the CBD following the Edgecumbe earthquake, despite the severe liquefaction manifestation and lateral spreading predicted under the likely ground motions of the Edgecumbe earthquake.

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  • Influence of ground motion duration on structural collapse risk

    Chandramohan, Reagan; Baker, Jack W.; Deierlein, Gregory G.; Blume, John A. (2016)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    - Previous research has concluded that ground motion duration influences only cumulative damage metrics, not peak structural deformations - Current structural design and assessment practice requires explicit consideration of only the response spectra of the ground motions anticipated at a site, not their durations - Recent studies by the authors using spectrally equivalent long and short duration ground motions have demonstrated that duration does influence structural collapse capacity

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  • SEISMIC STRENGTHENING OF REINFORCED CONCRETE COLUMNS WITH STRAIGHT CARBON FIBRE REINFORCED POLYMER (CFRP) ANCHORS

    Ingham, Jason; Griffith, Michael; del Rey Castillo, Enrique (2016)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    After consulting key members of the industry (BBR ConTech, Opus International, Fulton Hogan and Beca) it was found that, while the most common failure of RC columns is shear failure, the shear strengthening of RC columns with FRP anchors is fairly well known by engineers, and they are confident in their design. Flexural strengthening of RC columns with FRP anchors is a complex and unknown application and only one example of a research focused on this technique could be found in the existing literature. In addition to verify the applicability of the design equation previously developed, a few aspects not covered in the component tests will be investigated: • The effect of tensile-compression cycles • The effect of dynamic loading • The interaction between adjacent anchors • The behaviour of edge anchors • The effect of overlapped fan components • Behaviour on real case specimen • Effect of different confinement schemes • Effect of different anchor sizes • Strengthening of columns with lap splice failure

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  • Repaired Reinforced Concrete Walls and Lower-Damage Modifications

    Motter, Christopher J.; Petch, James; Stephens, Max; Lu, Yiqiu; Hube, Matias; Henry, Rick; Elwood, Kenneth J.; Clauson, Aaron (2016)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    As a result of the Canterbury earthquakes, over 60% of the concrete buildings in the Christchurch Central Business District have been demolished. This experience has highlighted the need to provide guidance on the residual capacity and repairability of earthquake-damaged concrete buildings. Experience from 2010 Chile indicates that it is possible to repair severely damaged concrete elements (see photo at right), although limited testing has been performed on such repaired components. The first phase of this project is focused on the performance of two lightly-reinforced concrete walls that are being repaired and re-tested after damage sustained during previous testing.

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  • Development of Loading Protocols for Quasi-Static Testing

    Motter, Christopher J.; Elwood, Kenneth J. (2016)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    Despite the abundance of large-scale laboratory testing to assess the seismic performance of components and systems, there is a lack of consistency in the testing protocols being used, which creates challenges when comparing test results across experimental programs. A lack of consensus is evident in existing recommendations for uni-directional testing protocols, while guidance on bidirectional protocols is limited. In an effort to address these shortcomings, specific recommendations for loading protocols are being developed for structural components, with the first phase of this study focused on the development of uni-directional testing protocols. To accomplish this objective, a suite of ground motions, scaled to the New Zealand code spectra for Wellington (an urban center located in a region of high seismicity), were used to conduct nonlinear response history analyses for a suite of single degree of freedom (SDOF) systems that comprised a range of ductility factors and structural periods. Using these results, statistical distributions of cumulative damage parameters are being used to develop loading protocol recommendations. Much of the approach outlined in this poster follows the methodology used by Mergos and Beyer (2014) to develop loading protocols suitable for regions of lower seismicity than that considered here.

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  • The Undrained Cyclic Response of Monterey Sand in Direct Simple Shear

    Cappellaro, C.; Cubrinovski, M.; Bray, J.D.; Stringer, M.E.; Riemer, M.F.; Chiaro, G. (2016)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    In 2010 and 2011 a series of earthquakes hit the central region of Canterbury, New Zealand, triggering widespread and damaging liquefaction in the area of Christchurch. Liquefaction occurred in natural clean sand deposits, but also in silty (fines-containing) sand deposits of fluvial origin. Comprehensive research efforts have been subsequently undertaken to identify key factors that influenced liquefaction triggering and severity of its manifestation. This research aims at evaluating the effects of fines content, fabric and layered structure on the cyclic undrained response of silty soils from Christchurch using Direct Simple Shear (DSS) tests. This poster outlines preliminary calibration and verification DSS tests performed on a clean sand to ensure reliability of testing procedures before these are applied to Christchurch soils.

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  • Creating the business case for investment in organisational resilience

    Hatton, Tracy; Brown, Charlotte; Seville, Erica; Vargo, John (2016)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    - To provide data to demonstrate the value of investment in organisational resilience; - To map the 5 year recovery trajectory of organisations; - To better understand the contextual factors that affect long term recovery.

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  • OpenSLAT: Software Tools for Seismic Loss Analysis

    Gauland, Michael; Moghaddasi, Masoud; Bradley, Brendon (2016)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    OpenSLAT is an open-source, object-oriented and extensible extension of the Seismic Loss Assessment Tool (SLAT; Bradley; 2009). Like its predecessor, OpenSLAT is a set of software components based around the Performance-based Earthquake Engineering (PBEE) framework from the Paci c Earthquake Engineering Research Center (PEER). OpenSLAT is written in C++ and Python, and allows users to create projects as C++ or Python programs, or as commands in its own language. OpenSLAT is intended for use by both researchers and practising engineers, and is released under an open-source license to encourage contributions from the user community.

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  • PHYSICAL AND FUNCTIONAL PERFORMANCE OF THE TELECOMMUNICATION INFRASTRUCTURE AFTER THE CANTERBURY EARTHQUAKE SEQUENCE

    Giovinazzi, Sonia; Rais, Adnan; Ruiter, Rob; Foster, Collin; Esposito, Simona; Stojadinovic, Bozidar; Tang, Alex; Nayyerloo, Mostafa (2016)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    The operation of telecommunication networks is critical during business as usual times, and becomes most vital in post-disaster scenarios, when the services are most needed for restoring other critical lifelines, due to inherent interdependencies, and for supporting emergency and relief management tasks. In spite of the recognized critical importance, the assessment of the seismic performance for the telecommunication infrastructure appears to be underrepresented in the literature. The FP6 QuakeCoRE project “Performance of the Telecommunication Network during the Canterbury Earthquake Sequence” will provide a critical contribution to bridge this gap. Thanks to an unprecedented collaboration between national and international researchers and highly experienced asset managers from Chorus, data and evidences on the physical and functional performance of the telecommunication network after the Canterbury Earthquakes 2010-2011 have been collected and collated. The data will be processed and interpreted aiming to reveal fragilities and resilience of the telecommunication networks to seismic events

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  • A Multi-Criteria Decision Tool to Support Seismic Resilience Investments Under Deep Uncertainty

    Kipp, Bob; Hatton, Tracy; Seville, Erica (2016)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    Project Aim  Create a tool to assist decision makers in understanding the synergies and trade-offs between different resilience investments.  Create a process for using the tool that enables decision makers to acknowledge and work with an uncertain future. Considering the long-term impacts of major investment decisions, in particular for land-use and infrastructure, the context gets more complicated under deep uncertainty. The solution included using plausible future scenarios and Multi-Criteria Decision Support methods to draw out assumptions, preferences, and uncertainties within the decision making process.

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  • LINKING BUILDING PROPERTIES TO EARTHQUAKE-INDUCED DAMAGE AND BUSINESS DOWNTIME USING FEMA P-58 AND REDI ASSESSMENTS

    Cremen, Gemma; Baker, Jack W.; Giovinazzi, Sonia; Seville, Erica (2016)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    The 2010-2011 Canterbury earthquake sequence, and the resulting extensive data sets on damaged buildings that have been collected, provide a unique opportunity to exercise and evaluate previously published seismic performance assessment procedures. This poster provides an overview of the authors’ methodology to perform evaluations with two such assessment procedures, namely the P-58 guidelines and the REDi Rating System. P-58, produced by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) in the United States, aims to facilitate risk assessment and decision-making by quantifying earthquake ground shaking, structural demands, component damage and resulting consequences in a logical framework. The REDi framework, developed by the engineering firm ARUP, aids stakeholders in implementing resilience-based earthquake design. Preliminary results from the evaluations are presented. These have the potential to provide insights on the ability of the assessment procedures to predict impacts using “real-world” data. However, further work remains to critically analyse these results and to broaden the scope of buildings studied and of impacts predicted.

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