17 results for Conference poster, 2007

  • Getting Research 'Out There': ResearchSpace@Auckland

    Newton-Wade, Vanessa; Laurie, John; Hayes, Leonie (2007)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    A key part of the academic research process is publishing the results ??? ???getting it out there???. An institutional repository such as ResearchSpace@Auckland provides authors with a channel for near-instantaneous worldwide dissemination of research. ResearchSpace@Auckland has been developed at the University of Auckland under the umbrella of the Institutional Repositories Aotearoa Project (Ira). Built using DSpace Open Source Software, the repository contains ???research outputs??? from the University of Auckland???s staff and students, including theses, papers and reports. The PhD thesis collection is the flagship of the repository ??? electronic submission is compulsory for all completing PhD students from 2011. The initial 200 items in the PhD thesis collection were gathered by contacting authors of theses submitted at the University of Auckland since 2001 and inviting them to submit digital copies and consent forms. Trials are underway to digitize theses that are unavailable in digital format. The mandating of compulsory submission for PhD theses submitted at the University of Auckland ensures regulatory requirements for digital deposit are catered for. Other collections for articles, papers, and images are being developed.

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  • Use of Accelerated Laboratory Evaluation by Extended Nurse Prescribers: A tool to improve practice?

    Cameron, Marie (2007-11-08)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Bacground ??? Because of the link between inappropriate antibiotic prescribing and antibiotic resistance, several strategies have been implemented to decrease inappropriate prescribing and improve prescribing practices. As 80% of antibiotic prescribing takes place in primary care, this area has often been the focus of these attempts. An example of such a strategy is the Accelerated Bacteriological Laboratory Evaluation (ABLE) service in Grampian, which provides an overnight microbiology results service. Aim - To describe the knowledge and use of the Accelerated Bacteriological Laboratory Evaluation (ABLE) service by Extended Nurse Prescribers in Grampian (UK). Methodology ??? Quantitative - Anonymous, self-completed, postal questionnaire of all regional Extended Nurse Prescribers, informed by a preliminary content-setting focus group. Analysis ??? Descriptive statistics (thematic analysis of focus group). Key Findings ??? Response rate was 74% (35/47) and 57% (20) of respondents were practice nurses. Eighty nine percent (31) of respondents knew about the ABLE service, and 88% (30) had used it, with 73% (22) using it often. Over half of respondents (55%) stated that they had insufficient information to allow them to make best use of the service. The main barrier to ABLE use was difficulty accessing results (50%/6). The main motivator for ABLE use was the desire to prescribe the correct antibiotic (71%/17). Conclusions ??? Although the majority of respondents were aware of the ABLE service and have used it, more information at more regular intervals is needed to encourage maximal use. Respondents were more likely to use the service for some conditions than others. Inclusion of information about ABLE in the Extended Nurse Prescribing course followed by regular postal and/or electronic reminders/updates would be preferred. These changes and the expansion of accelerated laboratory evaluation nationwide may help to reduce and improve prescribing practices.

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  • Stability of varietal aromas in Marlborough Sauvignon blanc wines

    Herbst, M; Kilmartin, Paul; Nicolau, Laura (2007-07)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The development of a whey-based kefir beverage: Physiocochemical, sensory and microbiological characteristics

    Chan, Cheuk; Quek, Siew-Young; Roberton, AM (2007-11-15)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Registry of BioBricks models using CellML

    Rouilly, Vincent; Canton, Barry; Nielsen, Poul; Kitney, Richard (2007)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. One of the main goals in Synthetic Biology is to assess the feasibility of building novel biological systems from interchangeable and standardized parts. In order to collect and share parts, a Registry of standardized DNA BioBricks http://parts.mit.edu/registry has been established at the MIT. BioBricks can be assembled to form devices and systems to operate in living cells. Design of reliable devices and systems would benefit from accurate models of system function. To predict the function of systems built from many parts, we need to have accurate models for the parts and mechanisms to easily compose those part models into a system model. Therefore, in parallel to increasing the number of parts available and characterising them experimentally, a logical extension to the Registry would be to build a Registry of BioBrick models to complement the physical parts.

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  • Multi-dimensional model generalisation of human activity patterns in space and time

    Zhao, Jinfeng; Forer, Pip (2007-09-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • CellML: Cellml.org, Tools and Community

    Lawson J.; Lloyd C.; Noble P.; Hunter P.; Nielsen P. (2007)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Poster presented at ICSB2007 The purpose of CellML is to store and exchange computer-based mathematical models of as wide a range of scale and subject as posssible. For example, biochemical signalling and metabolic systems can be embedded in electrophysiological models of excitable cells in CellML. The CellML language is an open standard based on the XML markup language and is being developed by the Bioengineering Institute at the University of Auckland and affiliated research groups [1]. The majority of computational biology publications aim to discuss their model but often fail to provide a comprehensive set of instructions for recreating the model, or include errors preventing reproduction of published model outputs. Publishing a paper with a link to a CellML model facilitates the wide distribution and recreation of that model, and additionally forces the modeller to carefully consider matters such as unit consistency. The CellML specification and application programming interfaces (API) are driven by a core team, but a growing international community is involved in work related to CellML. A community website (www.cellml.org) has been set up as a focal point for the community and also functions as a model repository. A number of groups are developing software tools for CellML and using the language for research in computational biology. A repository of almost 300 unique CellML models is available at www.cellml.org/models: these are computational models from peer-reviewed publications that have been coded into CellML. These models are undergoing an active curation process based on the MIRIAM standard, proposed by the international biological modelling community [2]. This process includes provision of comprehensive documentation, annotation with citation and model author metadata, maintenance of file modification histories, and correspondence with model authors to ensure that models define all required initial conditions and parameters. The CellML community strongly supports collaboration with other groups to continue to set standards for curation and distribution of biological models. A number of free / open source software tools for developing and simulating CellML models are available, including Physiome CellML Environment (PCEnv) and Cellular Open Resource (COR). Other modelling environments such as JSim and Virtual Cell also support the CellML format. Information on further tools such as validators, debuggers and simulation specific packages can be found at www.cellml.org/tools. In the near future, models in the cellml.org model repository will be completely annotated with ontologies such as BioPaX and references to databases such as UniProt. Models will be broken down into the components from which they are comprised, and these components will themselves be curated, providing a toolbox of standardised computational parts from which new models can be created, in an in silico analogy to the MIT Registry of Standard Biological parts (http://parts.mit.edu/registry/index.php/Main_Page). An API has recently been developed for software tools to allow interaction between CellML and SVG diagrams of models, such as biochemical pathway schematics, and work is also underway to standardise graphical representations of CellML models. For more information, please join the CellML community mailing list at http://www.cellml.org/mailman/listinfo/cellml-discussion. 1.) Cuellar, A.A., Lloyd, C. M., Nielsen, P. F., Bullivant, D. P., Nickerson, D. P., Hunter, P. J. "An Overview of CellML 1.1, a Biological Model Description Language" Simulation, 2003, 79, No. 12, 740-747 2.) Le Novere, N., Finney, A., Hucka, M., Bhalla, U.S., Campagne, F., Collado-Vides, J., Crampin, E.J., Halstead, M., Klipp, E., Mendes, P., Nielsen, P., Sauro, H., Shapiro, B., Snoep, J.L., Spence, H.D., Wanner, B.L. "Minium information requested in the annotation of biochemical models (MIRIAM)" Nature Biotechnology, 2005, 23 1509-1515

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  • Identifying and Visualizing Surface Detail on Michelangelo's David

    Rugis, John (2007)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    We present the results of new experiments in which we have identified, characterized, and produced visualizations of selected fine surface detail on Michelangelo???s David statue. Starting with available raw scan data [Levoy et al. 2000], we have applied a number of techniques, both developed and refined by us, including the calculation of curvature maps, 2.5D spatial noise filtering, texture projection merging [Rugis 2006], and image processing assisted physical measurement. ....

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  • New sugar agents for the control of undesirable microbes in the food industry

    Oliveira, Maria; Justino, J; Neves, A; Rauter, AP (2007-11-14)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The Blob - Slicing and dicing in Oracle

    Mustatea, Nicoleta; Jansen, Peter (2007)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    At The University of Auckland Library we successfully tried another approach in demystifying the BLOB: slicing it in Oracle by employing existing functions in Voyager. All we have done is to invoke these functions into our SQL statements and in no time at all we obtain the information we want. We can run these queries in 3 different environments: ???? Oracle???s own SQL+ ???? Microsoft Access (in Pass-through Queries) ???? SQL Server 2000 The advantages of using this approach are: Speed of execution Data extraction is server side therefore independent of Microsoft Access VB. Possibility to schedule the query to run at fixed intervals. (in SQL Server) The simplicity of using what is already in the Voyager database is making this melange of Oracle and SQL server queries not only chic but also efficient.

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  • Institutional Collaboration around Institutional Repositories

    Hayes, Leonie; Stevenson, Alison; Mason, Ingrid; Scott, Anne; Kennedy, Peter (2007)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Three New Zealand universities have been collaborating on a project to provide open, web-based, access to research outputs through the creation of institutional repositories using the DSpace software. This poster will therefore address the theme of eResearch with particular focus on the benefits of active collaboration, intra-university, inter-university and international, in this area of activity. New Zealand has a small population of 4 million, an innovative and resourceful academic community, a newly implemented research funding model, based on performance (PBRF) and a readiness to stay competitive with the rest of the world. Institutional Repositories in New Zealand are in their infancy but a considerable body of experience already exists overseas which we can draw upon if we work in partnership with those institutions who have already implemented institutional repositories. Funding is limited but by sharing resources and working collaboratively each institution can make substantial progress towards the creation of individual repositories. This poster reports on the joint project between the University of Auckland, the University of Canterbury and Victoria University of Wellington. The three partners have been funded by the New Zealand Tertiary Education Commission to make available, via the Internet for access by Open Archives Initiative (OAI) compliant search engines, research outputs created by staff and students of the three partner institutions. This poster will present information on the work to: ??? Establish DSpace repositories in partner institutions that conform to the OAI-PMH standard. ??? Contribute to the development of linkages with the Australian DEST funded information infrastructure projects, i.e. ADT, APSR and ARROW projects. ??? Identify methods for increasing academic understanding of, and promoting contributions to, digital repositories the content of which is then available to enhance teaching and learning, as well as research. ??? Provide digital materials, either through the deposit of ???born digital??? material or through digitisation of material already available in print, that contribute to the developing digital content landscape as envisaged in the NZ Digital Strategy ??? Contribute to national research resource discovery service to be established by the National Library of New Zealand. Ensure that the content in the project repositories is visible for harvesting by global OAI-compliant search engines such as Google Scholar, OAIster, etc. Collaborate with other IR projects and communicate the lessons learned to the wider tertiary and research communities of New Zealand

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  • Modelling NFAT Cycling Sensitivity in the Cardiac Myocyte

    Cooling, Michael; Hunter, Peter; Crampin, Edmund (2007-10-01)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The transcription factor NFAT acts as a signal integrator for a number of signal transduction pathways in cardiac myocytes that initiates gene expression in the disease Pathological Cardiac Hypertrophy[1]. Here we develop a quantitative mathematical model of the cytoplasmicnuclear-cytoplasmic cycling of NFAT in response to calcium signals in the cardiac myocyte

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  • Bacterially mediated manganese deposition in novel "anelli" within the biofilms of an impacted urban stream

    Smith, JP; Lewis, Gillian (2007-12-02)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The purpose of this work is to identify bacteria responsible for the formation of manganese containing anelli within stream biofilms, and study their distribution. Manganese oxidising bacteria are part of a diverse group of organisms found commonly within many disparate environments, which deposit manganese and iron biominerals within biofilms and flocs [1]. The purpose of microbial manganese oxidation is poorly understood, but may be associated with energy production, mobilisation of nutrients, protection and/or detoxification [1, 2]. Manganese has a high sorptive capacity for heavy metals, metalloids, and other ions, as well as a strong oxidizing potential, and therefore frequently induces co-precipitation of cations present within the surrounding environment [1]. Within urban streams contaminants such as heavy metals may therefore potentially be concentrated within steam biofilms in the presence of manganese oxidising bacteria.

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  • Effect of light regimes on the utilisation of an exogenous carbon source by freshwater biofilm communities

    Lear, Gavin; Lewis, Gillian (2007-06-23)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Biofilms are a major source of ???in stream??? primary production, exhibiting high population density, and being an important source of carbon for microbial heterotrophs. Changing patterns of land-use within freshwater catchment areas may greatly impact on stream biofilm microbial community structure, which in turn may influence the speed and extent with which full ecosystem recovery may occur. This study reports how freshwater biofilm communities respond to additions of acetate, used as a proxy for organic matter, the primary source of carbon within shaded forests and headwater streams. The use of [ 13C] acetate and subsequent isolation of 13C-labelled nucleic acids from the metabolically active fraction of the bacterial community enabled substrate assimilating organisms to be identified. In addition, biofilms were exposed to varied levels of incident light to assess the relative contribution of phototrophic and heterotrophic nutrition.

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  • Diversity in Large Classes: The Challenge Of Providing Self Directed Formative Learning

    Harper, Amanda; Brittain, Judith (2007-12-02)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    First year science courses at the University of Auckland face a number of common challenges which impact on course design and learning support for individual students. The large student cohorts (> 1100) entering courses are not only diverse in future program choices but also in their educational backgrounds. Opportunities for formative learning have been developed though the web environment using the university???s ???in house??? learning management system Cecil, and Bestchoice (an interactive learning portal). http://bestchoice.net.nz (Woodgate and Titheridge 2006). These formative learning activities have been integrated into existing course designs (Gunn & Harper 2006) to support diversity in learning strategies and learning styles while enabling all students to develop a sound body of knowledge essential in the discipline of Science. Teachers across the disciplines of Chemistry and Biological Sciences maintain a professional dialogue about learning developments. There is an overlap of the order of 80% across the Biology and Chemistry cohorts. Where it is appropriate, similar technologies are used. This commonality between courses results in improvements in students??? learning outcomes. This is part of teaching reflective practice which is currently influencing future developments.

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  • Development of an organisational memory scale

    Dunham, Annette (2007-12-06)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    In many countries, people are retiring earlier than ever before and the retirement of the baby boom generation over the next two decades further intensifies the impact of this trend. Accompanying this development, are fears about the potential loss of organisational knowledge or memory which may equate to the loss of the organisation???s competitive advantage. Organisations, while recognizing that older workers often possess valuable ???organisational memory??? seem to also assume these same workers will readily divest themselves of their knowledge. Encouraging experienced workers to act as a mentor to younger or less experienced workers, is often mentioned in the management and related literature as a way of capturing and retaining valuable organisational knowledge. However, employees (including older workers) in the possession of considerable organisational memory, may, or may not be willing to divulge their knowledge to others, for a number of reasons. This poster presents initial results from the first of a series of studies designed to examine the relationship between organisational memory in the individual and propensity to mentor. It outlines the development and exploratory factor analysis of an ???Organisational Memory??? scale that taps the individual???s own resources in terms of organisational knowledge and expertise. Subsequent studies in the proposed research aim to help organisations more effectively target potential mentors for the purposes of retaining organisational knowledge, while also identifying the relevant costs and benefits of mentoring perceived by those individuals. By doing so it is hoped organisations will have a clearer understanding of how they can minimize costs while emphasising the benefits of such a relationship for the potential mentor. In contrast to the ???development outcomes??? focus of much of the mentoring literature, these studies give attention to the ???knowledge sharing role of mentoring, while also touching on developmental outcomes, in this case, for the mentor

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  • Protein-Based Identification of Epithelial Cell Types in Forensic Samples

    Simons, Joanne; Vintiner, SK (2007-09-04)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Although the value of DNA profiles found at a crime scene is indisputable, there is increasing importance in identifying the cellular source of the DNA as well as the identity of the person to whom the profile belongs. Knowledge regarding the cellular source from which the DNA profile originates increases the evidential value of the sample. Our research involves investigation of protein candidates in order to find an epithelial cell type-specific protein that will enable differentiation of vaginal, buccal and skin cells in forensic samples. We have used several methods including histochemical stains, western analysis and immunohistochemistry to investigate candidate proteins known to be present in various types of epithelial cells. Our most current results from these studies will be presented here.

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