31 results for Conference poster, 2008

  • Functional analysis of the novel melanoma master-regulators

    Wang, Li (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Melanoma is a devastating form of cancer that is especially common in New Zealand and that is incompletely understood. In this project, we are using clinical microarray information about the function of tens of thousands of genes in melanoma patients. We are combining this clinical microarray information with microarray analysis of melanoma cells in the laboratory. In this laboratory analysis we have knocked down the expression of 75 different genes using a method known as siRNA. This clinical and laboratory data is combined mathematically using a method known as gene network analysis. This allows us to identify novel "master-regulators" of melanoma, which are seen as “hubs” in melanoma gene networks. These hubs may drive the uncontrolled growth of melanoma cells, and are likely to be useful as prognostic markers or new drug targets. We have already identified several novel melanoma gene network hubs using this method. The sequences encoding these hubs are cloning into an expression vector, and the candidate hub genes are then screened through a functional screening platform. Since we are interested the clinically important genes, we screen to identify those genes that may play a role in proliferation, sensitivity to drug-induced apoptosis, and survival. We will transfect all the candidate genes (alongside a negative vector only control and a positive control of Bcl-2) into 293T cells (human embryonic kidney cells containing the SV40large T antigen to promote episomal replication of transfected plasmids), and A375 cells (melanoma). We will screen for expressed gene function using assays for viable cell number (MTT), assays for cell cycle progression (flow cytometry), and apoptosis assays. In particular we will use the anti-neoplastic drug etoposide (VP16) to induce apoptosis in cells that have been transfected by these genes and controls, to assess gene product function in modifying the apoptosis induced by VP16. For clinically relevant network hub genes that appear to play a role in controlling proliferation, apoptosis and survival, we will home in further on their mechanism of action (the methods used will depend upon our hypotheses about the gene product's function). We hope some of those hubs may lead to novel diagnostic/prognostic assays and novel drug targets.

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  • What drives bacterial community structure in stream biofilms?

    Roberts, Kelly; Lear, Gavin; Turner, Susan; Lewis, Gillian (2008-08-17)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    BACKGROUND The microorganisms within biofilms are the key basal trophic level within most freshwater systems. However, microbial structure, function and succession in natural stream systems remain poorly understood. This research characterises the biofilm community structure of stream biofilms experiencing different anthropogenic impacts and how they change over time. Our aim is describe the changes in bacterial biofilm communities over time and to investigate what drives these changes.

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  • Can tree weta detect terrestrial bats

    Lomas, Kathryn; Field, LH; Wild, John; Kubke, Maria; Parsons, Stuart (2008-10)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Interactions between insects and bats are well-known examples of predator-prey co-evolution. For example, moths have evolved hearing abilities that allow them to respond to sounds in the ultrasound range, thus enabling them to detect the echolocation calls of hunting bats and perform evasive manoeuvres (Roeder 1998). Although New Zealand insects are preyed upon by endemic bats, no studies have examined whether they possess similar strategies for predator avoidance. If auditory information is used to detect and avoid predation, then the frequencies of greatest sensitivity of the auditory organ are predicted to correspond to the echolocation frequency (or other hunting-related sounds) produced by predatory bats. New Zealand has two endemic bats, the long tailed bat (Chalinolobus tuberculatus) and lesser short tailed bat (Mystacina tuberculata). Long tailed bats are typical aerial insectivores and are not known to prey on weta.

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  • Stream Restoration: Getting the microbial ecology right.

    Lewis, Gillian; Lear, Gavin; Turner, Susan; Boothroyd, Ian; Stott, Rebecca; Roberts, Kelly; Ancion, Pierre; Dopheide, Andrew; Washington, Vidya; Knight, Duane; Smith, Joanna (2008-08-17)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    A comprehensive program to re-establish the structure and function of an ecosystem, including its natural diversity and aquatic habitats.

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  • A novel implantable blood pressure telemetry device: Comparison between Data Sciences and Telemetry Research systems

    Malpas, Simon; Lim, M; McCormick, John; Kirton, RS; Van Vliet, B; Easteal, Allan; Barrett, Carolyn; Guild, Sarah-Jane; Budgett, David (2008-04-05)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The pending expiry (May 2008) of a Data Sciences (DSI) patent in the area of blood pressure telemetry permits the development of alternative technologies. A key aspect in providing new telemetry systems is a comparison to existing technology. Important aspects include stability of the calibration over time and the ability to capture the pulsitile blood pressure waveform. In a group of 6 rats and 5 rabbits DSI blood pressure transmitters (C40 or D70 models) were implanted in conjunction with Telemetry Research (TR) transmitters. Both systems incorporate a fluid filled catheter of similar dimensions with a biocompatible gel in the tip. The blood pressure waveform was collected via telemetry for up to 2 months after implantation. The signal was sampled at 500 Hz and digitally transmitted to a receiver up to 5 m away The battery of TR transmitter was recharged within the rat using inductive power transfer technology. The pulsitile waveform associated with each heart beat was reflected similarly in all cases although the frequency response of DSI telemeters was limited to ~40 Hz (–3 dB rolloff point). The calibrated offset level between the two transmitters was not more than 5 mmHg at all times over a 2 month period. We conclude that the Telemetry Research blood pressure transmitters offer comparable performance to existing technology but with extra design advantages (rechargeable, co-housing of animals, greater range).

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  • Metabolomics as a novel approach to study mixed species biofilms of stream bacteria exhibiting mutualistic and antagonistic responses

    Washington, Vidya; Villas-Boas, Silas; Lewis, Gillian (2008-08-17)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Experimental objective / Purpose 1. To investigate the metabolic interactions of bacterial species using metabolic footprint profiling. 2. As proof of concept, microbes exhibiting mutualistic and antagonistic associations were chosen for this study.

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  • Effects of Storm water metal contaminats on microbial communities in stream biofilm revealed by Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis (ARISA)

    Ancion, Pierre; Lear, Gavin; Lewis, Gillian (2008-08-17)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Stormwater metal contaminants are known to be a threat to our freshwater environments but little is known about their effects on stream micro-organisms. This project investigates accumulation and release of the most common stormwater metal contaminants (zinc, copper and lead) in stream biofilms and their effects on bacterial populations.

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  • Afferent axonal pathfinding in developing chicken rhomboencephalon

    Kubke, Maria; Wild, JM (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The developing hindbrain of vertebrates i organized in a series of rhombomeres, each giving rise to specifi c nuclei. The role of this segmentation has been extensively studied with respect to the origin of motor nuclei. The development of afferent innervation, however, has received little attention. Afferent axons enter the brainstem prior to the migration of their central targets and must therefore navigate in the absence of target derived information. Since the target nuclei for each afferent component originates within discrete rhombomeric boundaries, it is possible that the same positional information that is used by neuronal progenitors to defi ne their fi nal fate, may be available to afferent axons to direct them through their initial growth. This study was aimed at determining the normal sequence that characterises the growth of afferent axons in the hindbrain within the context of the site of origin and of the organisation of second order sensory neurons within specifi c rhombomere boundaries. Afferent axons were labelled at different embryonic ages using fl uorescent lipophilic dyes. Crystals of DiI and/or DiO were placed on specifi c exposed nerves or nerve branches of fi xed embryos. Embryos were incubated at 30 C for 18 hrs, after which the hindbrains were dissected, cleared in glycerol and analysed as whole-mount preparations with confocal microscopy. Afferent axons formed a series of fascicles that extended longitudinally along the alar plate, beyond the rhombomeric boundaries that give rise to their target nuclei. At early stages, the degree of organization and segregation of afferent axons did not appear to refl ect the adult patterns. Thus, it appears that the appropriate pathfi nding and fi nal segregation of the afferent components involves an initial profuse growth into the hindbrain, and that proper afferent patterning involves axon retraction and may require the initiation of migration if the central targets towards their fi nal position.

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  • Giving research global reach: ResearchSpace@Auckland

    Newton-Wade, Vanessa; Hayes, Leonie (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    A key part of the academic research process is publishing the results – ‘getting it out there’. An institutional repository such as ResearchSpace@Auckland provides authors with a channel for near-instantaneous worldwide dissemination of research. ResearchSpace@Auckland at the University of Auckland was initially developed under the umbrella of the Institutional Repositories Aotearoa (Ira) Project. The project between Auckland, Canterbury and Victoria Universities used DSpace Open Source Software and was funded by the Tertiary Education Commission (TEC). The project was completed in 2007. ResearchSpace is now a full production system with seamless Disaster Recovery ability, which allows authors to submit their work confident that it will be secure. ResearchSpace contains ‘research outputs’ from the University of Auckland’s staff and students, including theses, papers and reports. From 2007 it is a requirement for all enrolling PhD students to submit a digital copy of their thesis upon completion. The PhD collection has grown from an initial 200 items at the beginning of 2007 to nearly 1700 items. 775 of these are open-access. This has been achieved via a retrospective digitization project for all PhD theses and a campaign to contact the authors for permission. Key features of ResearchSpace • Authors submit their own content initially (self-submission), administrators check content and publish it online • Most content is freely available to any user – use is not restricted to members of the institution or subscribers • Durable & Permanent URLs: we use ‘Handles’. e.g. http://hdl.handle.net/2292/1430. A handle does not have the institution’s domain name in the URL, if the website is changed or moved, the URL will still go to the correct location. • Preservation: creating digital files allows creation of a new print copy if necessary. Thesis files are in Portable Document Format (PDF), and the library has undertaken to keep the formats up to date, as technology may change in the future.

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  • Is negative exercise reinforcement a feature of exercise dependence? : factor analysis and further validation of the Exercise Reinforcement Questionnaire

    Lambert, Michelle (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Human Activities Modify Bacterial Diversity in Stream Benthic Biofilm Communities

    Lewis, Gillian; Roberts, Kelly; Turner, Susan; Lear, Gavin (2008-06-01)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    This study tests the hypothesis that human impact is an important driver of stream biofilm bacterial population diversity. The seasonal bacterial composition of biofilm in 4 streams with different levels of human impact was determined over 2 years. Bacterial diversity derived from 16S rDNA clone libraries, shows both between stream differences and seasonal transitions in bacterial occurrence and population dominance at a class and genus level. Diversity analysis calculated on pooled seasonal data (class level identification) shows that while composition of the populations are different there is a similar level of both bacterial richness and bacterial diversity in each stream. Trends in bacterial occurrence suggest that the most degraded stream were dominated by cyanobacteria, the mid range impact streams by aeromonads and gamma proteobacteria, while the unimpacted stream showed both high diversity and no dominance by any particular class.

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  • Safety and efficacy of a superantigen based vaccine carrier in human MHC II-CD4 transgenic mice

    Radcliff, FJ; Munro, GH; Fraser, JD (2008-12-08)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Cell proliferative and radioprotective properties of bioactive Salvia sclareoides extracts

    Ruivo, D; Oliveira, Maria; Rauter, AP; Justino, J; Goulart, M (2008-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • ResearchSpace@Auckland : Disaster Recovery (DR)

    Latt, Yin Yin; Hayes, Leonie (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The University of Auckland Library and Information Technology Services have partnered to provide a DSpace installation utilising a mature IT infrastructure. The application is hosted on the University of Auckland’s virtual server cluster in the recently completed “City Data Centre” along with other enterprise systems. ResearchSpace is operational 24x7 and has a Disaster Recovery mirror located at a second location. Handle identifiers are maintained between the two systems to ensure users can submit items at all times.

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  • The CellML Model Repository as a Resource for Cardiac Modelling

    Lawson, J.R.; Nobile, P.J.; Lloyd, C.M.; Neilsen, P.F.; Hunter, P.J. (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Poster presented at Waiheke 2008 Multiscale Modelling of the Heart Workshop. The CellML repository now contains a number of well curated CellML models of cardiac biology and physiology at the cellular and subcellular level. Recently this resource has been growing rapidly in both quality and quantity and includes models of cardiac electrophysiology, excitation-contraction coupling, myofilament mechanics, signalling systems and combinations thereof. Herein we describe the CellML model repository, its range of models, the tools used to develop and test these models and the processes and aims of curating them. The relevance of this resource to multi-scale modelling of the heart in the present and the future is then discussed.

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  • Space-Time Multi-Resolution Banded Graph-Cut for Fast Segmentation. (Conference Poster)

    Vaudrey, Tobi; Gruber, Daniel; Wedel, Andreas; Klappstein, Jens (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Conference Details: 30th Annual Symposium of the German Association for Pattern Recognition DAGM Munich, Germany, June 2008. http://www.dagm2008.org/ Applying real-time segmentation is a major issue when processing every frame of image sequences. In this paper, we propose a modi cation of the well known graph-cut algorithm to improve speed for discrete segmentation. Our algorithm yields real-time segmentation, using graph-cut, by performing a single cut on an image with regions of di erent resolutions, combining space-time pyramids and narrow bands. This is especially suitable for image sequences, as segment borders in one image are re ned in the next image. The fast computation time allows one to use information contained in every image frame of an input image stream at 20 Hz, on a standard PC. The algorithm is applied to traf- c scenes, using a monocular camera installed in a moving vehicle. Our results show the segmentation of moving objects with similar results to standard graph-cut, but with improved speed.

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  • Goal: Real-Time Segmentation via Graph Cut Goal: Real-Time Segmentation via Graph Cut

    Vaudrey, Tobi; Wedel, Andreas; Rabe, Clemens; Klappstein, Jens; Klette, Reinhard (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Conference Details: 2008 23rd International Conference Image and Vision Computing New Zealand. IVCNZ 08. Lincoln University, Christchurch, 26-28 November 2008. http://www.lvl.co.nz/ivcnz2008/ The detection of moving objects is a crucial part of driver assistance systems. This paper tackles this issue using computer vision. Two approaches are investigated, monocular and stereoscopic. The base principals and implementational issues are discussed and detailed, high- lighting areas of concern. In both cases, the detection is based on motion analysis of individually tracked image points (optical ow). The monoc- ular approach relies solely on the optical ow, where as the stereoscopic approach also takes stereo depth information into account. In both ap- proaches the motion analysis provides a motion metric which corresponds to the likelihood that the tracked point is moving. Based on this metric the points are segmented into objects by employing the globally op- timal graph cut algorithm. These approaches are then compared and contrasted using real-world vehicle image sequences.

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  • A Variant of Adaptive Mean Shift-Based Clustering

    Li, Fajie; Klette, Reinhard (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Conference Details: ICONIP 2008 - 15th International Conference on Neural Information. Processing of the Asia-Pacific Neural Network Assembly November 25-28, 2008, Auckland, New Zealand We are interested in clustering sets of highly overlapping clusters. For example, given is an observed set of stars (considered to be a set of points); how to find (recover) clusters which are the contributing galaxies of the observed union of those clusters? Below we propose a modification of an adaptive mean shift-based clustering algorithm (called Algorithm 1) proposed in 2003 by B. Geogescu, I. Shimsoni and P. Meer

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  • An Approach for Evaluating Robustness of Edge Operators using Real-World Driving Scenes

    Al-Sarraf, Ali; Vaudrey, Tobi; Klette, Reinhard; Woo, Young Woon (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Conference Details: 2008 23rd International Conference Image and Vision Computing New Zealand Lincoln University, Christchurch, 26-28 November 2008. http://www.lvl.co.nz/ivcnz2008/ Over the past 20 years there have been many papers that compare and evaluate di erent edge operators. Most of them focus on accuracy and also do comparisons against synthetic data. This paper focuses on real-world driver assistance scenes and does a comparison based on robustness. The three edge operators compared are Sobel, Canny and the under-publicized phase-based Kovesi-Owens operator. The Kovesi- Owens operator has the distinct advantage that it uses one pre-selected set of parameters and can work across almost any type of scene, where as other operators require parameter tuning. The results from our comparison show that the Kovesi-Owens operator is the most robust of the three, and can get decent results, even under weak illumination and varying gradients in the images. Keywords: edge operators, edge robustness evaluation, Kovesi-Owens, phase operators

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  • Ciliate Diversity in Stream Biofilms revealed by group-specific PCR primers.

    Dopheide, Andrew; Lear, Gavin; Stott, R; Lewis, Gillian (2008-08-17)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The ciliates are a diverse protozoan phylum, thought to be of considerable ecological importance in stream ecosystems, including organisms which are abundant and important consumers of bacteria, algae and other protozoa. Understanding of ciliate diversity and ecology is limited, however, particularly in benthic habitats such as stream biofilms. In this study, phylum-specific PCR primers were used in combination with cloning, sequencing and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis to investigate ciliate communities in stream biofilms.

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