25 results for Conference poster, 2009

  • What Does My Grade Mean?: Differing Assessment Models in Chemistry.

    Salter, David (2009-06)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Determining whether students have learnt what was intended is a crucial aspect of every course. How this is done and what the outcome shows can however vary greatly. Traditionally in New Zealand, tertiary students’ academic ability is assessed using methods that allow for discrimination between students through norm-referencing, typically producing a single cumulative percentage value which is translated into a letter grade. In contrast, the Government-mandated system for assessing secondary school students in New Zealand is based on a model of criterion-referenced assessment that aims to describe students’ current level of performance with reference to specific performance criteria which are derived from national curriculum statements. Consequently, in progressing from secondary to tertiary education in New Zealand, students experience a major change in the assessment of their performance from being independent of others to being relative to others. A comparison of these two assessment systems used in New Zealand will be presented as well as a description of how standards-based assessment is being introduced into several first-year tertiary chemistry courses as a way to better indicate students’ current capabilities and assist students in the transition between secondary and tertiary education.

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  • Practice-led curricula: driving from the front or rear seat?

    Adamson, Carole (2009-11-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Do knowledge-driven or practice-led models best serve the needs of social work practitioners engagin

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  • Using neuroanatomical imaging to learn about New Zealand's endemic species

    Corfield, Jeremy; Wild, John; Parsons, Stuart; Kubke, Maria (2009-08)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Isolated from the world, New Zealand became a place where birds, in the absence of terrestrial mammals, evolved a diverse assortment of shapes, sizes and behaviours.

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  • A Multiscale, Spatially-Distributed Model of Airway Hyper-Responsiveness

    Donovan, Graham; Politi, Antonio; Sneyd, A; Tawhai, Merryn (2009-05)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Rationale: Airway hyper−responsiveness (AHR), along with airway hyper−sensitivity, is a defining feature of asthma, and greater understanding of this emergent phenomenon may lead to better insight into and treatment of the condition. We seek a multiscale, spatially−distributed, mathematical model of the lung to help us understand the role of airway smooth muscle and parenchymal material in AHR. Methods: Our model couples together the organ scale with the tissue scale in the lung in a multiscale approach to the problem. At the organ level, parenchymal tissue is modeled as a compressible Blatz−Ko material in three dimensions, with expansion and recoil of lung tissue due to tidal breathing. The governing equations of finite elasticity deformation are solved using a finite element method. An airway tree is embedded in this tissue, with airway smooth muscle behavior described by a modified Hai−Murphy cross−bridge model (Wang et al., Biophys. J. 94:2008). Each airway segment is initially assumed to be radially symmetric and longitudinally stiff, and thus the embedded airway tree is essentially 1D. Results: Our spatially−distributed, multiscale model yields organ−level observations while incorporating tissue−level modeling detail. Preliminary results from the integrated model indicate potential use in the study of many phenomena associated with asthmatic AHR, including spatial distribution of ventilation defects, patchiness, and effects of deep inspirations.

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  • A Computational Model For Cerebral Circulation And Its Application For Haemodynamic Modelling In Vascular Surgeries

    Ho, Harvey; Mithraratne, K; Hunter, Peter (2009)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • 'Yes we can!': The emerging contribution of social work leadership to clinical governance and quality improvement in district health board mental health services

    McNabb, D; Webster, Michael (2009)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Learning styles and e-learning: Delivering knowledge and skills for health, human service and social work managers

    Webster, Michael (2009-03-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The Implementation of Cooperative Learning in New Zealand Physical Education.

    Dyson, Benedict; Ovens, Alan; Smith, Wayne (2009-09-24)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • A case study on frontline perspectives of organizational change: A practitioner-academic partnership to analyse the creation of a Youth Justice entity in Child, Youth and Family

    Webster, Michael; Herrmann, Klaus (2009-11-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • New antifungal and antibacterial compounds: 1,3-oxazoline- and 1,3-oxazolidine-2-thiones

    Oliveira, Maria; Justino, J; Silva, S; Tatibouet, A; Rollin, P; Rauter, AP (2009-01-20)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Purine nucleosides as new agents for the control of Alzheimer’s disease

    Oliveira, Maria; Marcelo, F; Justino, J; Jacob, AP; Bleriot, Y; Sinay, P; Goulart, M; Rauter, AP (2009-01-20)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Molecular mechanisms of human T cell differentiation - a role for DNA methylation

    Sheppard, Hilary; Brooks, Anna; Dunbar, PR (2009-09-01)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The differentiation state of CD8+ T cells is an important determinant of their ability to eradicate tumours and infection; progressive differentiation appears to lead to a decreased upregulated suggesting an indirect mechanism underlie T cell differentiation. Several key cell surface markers are down regulated as differentiation progresses see Fig. 1). We have found that promoter DNA methylation is one mechanism involved in the down regulation of these genes This suggests that manipulation of DNA methylation of key genes could be used to improve the survival and function of CD8+ T cells.

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  • Engaging citizenship; formations of professionalism in social development practice - Doctoral Study

    Harington, Philip (2009-02-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    As an occupational identity emerges, how are critical elements of professionalism resolved in practice?

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  • Factors Influencing the Aroma Stability of New Zealand Sauvignon blanc

    Herbst, M; Nicolau, Laura; Kilmartin, Paul (2009-08)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Factors Influencing the Aroma Stability of New Zealand Sauvignon blanc

    Herbst-Johnstone, Mandy; Kilmartin, PA; Nicolau, L (2009)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Nano-structural organisation in ionic liquids

    Kathirgamanathan, Kalyani; Al-Hakkak, J; Edmonds, Neil; Easteal, Allan; Grigsby, WJ (2009-12-09)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • A frontline perspective of organizational change: Analyzing the creation of a Youth Justice entity in Child, Youth and Family using Lewin, Kotter & Schein's change management and organizational culture models

    Webster, Michael; Herrmann, K (2009-03-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Approximated Ground Truth for Stereo and Motion Analysis on Real-World Sequences (Poster)

    Liu, Zhifeng; Klette, Reinhard (2009)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Conference details: The 3rd Pacific-Rim Symposium on Image and Video Technology (PSIVT2009) Tokyo, Japan, January 13th—16th, 2009 http://psivt2009.nii.ac.jp/ We approximate ground truth for real-world stereo sequences and demonstrate its use for the performance analysis of a few selected stereo matching and optic flow techniques. Basically we assume zero roll and constant tilt of an ego-vehicle (for about 10 seconds) driving on a planar road.

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  • Inclusion of a Second-Order Prior into Semi-Global Matching. (2009)

    Hermann, Simon; Klette, Reinhard; Destenfanis, Eduardo (2009)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Conference details: The 3rd Pacific-Rim Symposium on Image and Video Technology (PSIVT2009) Tokyo, Japan, January 13th—16th, 2009 http://psivt2009.nii.ac.jp/ We consider different parameter settings for SGM, suggest to include a second order prior into the smoothness term of the energy function, and propose and test a new cost function. Some preprocessing (edge images) proves to be of value for improving SGM stereo results on real-world data.

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  • Cells isolated from adult human brain. Are they fibroblasts, neural stem cells or both?

    Park, In; Gibbons, Hannah; Mee, EW; Teoh, HH; Faull, Richard; Dragunow, Michael (2009)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The discovery of endogenous neural progenitor cells (NPCs) in the adult human brain capable of migrating and differentiating in response to external stimuli has re-defined the field of neuroscience. In order to study and characterize these NPCs, research groups have attempted to culture them in vitro with varying success. Adult human NPCs are generally cultured from the two major neurogenic regions of the brain; the subventricular zone (SVZ) and the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. However, we propose that cells with similar characteristics to NPCs can be isolated and cultured from other regions of the adult human brain. Briefly, human brain cells were isolated from the middle temporal gyrus (MTG) of post-mortem and biopsy tissue and diced into small pieces prior to enzymatic digestion. The dissociated cells were plated onto poly-L-lysine (PLL) coated culture flasks. Initially the cells were maintained in media consisting of 10% serum, DMEM:F12 media supplemented with 2mM glutamine and antibiotics at 5% CO2/37ºC. Once confluent, the cells were re-plated into conditions favourable for NPC growth (serum free Neurobasal medium supplemented with N2, 2mM GlutaMAX® and antibiotics or commercially available STEMPRO® medium (Invitrogen)) in either adherent monolayer cultures or non-adherent surfaces for the formation of spheres. When cells from the MTG were cultured in 10% serum, the dominating cell type that arose after prolonged culture periods were fibroblast-like cells (FbCs), which were highly proliferative and expressed high levels of fibroblast markers. However, when cultured under NPC conditions, FbCs became bipolar in morphology and strongly expressed genes associated with NPCs such as nestin, GFAP and GFAP-δ and βIII-tubulin. These expression patterns partially resembled those seen with adherent adult human NPCs isolated from the SVZ. Furthermore, when FbCs were cultured on non-adhesive surfaces, they formed spherical structures resembling neurospheres formed from adult human SVZ-derived NPCs. When these FbC-spheres were plated onto adhesive surfaces they gave rise to cells expressing immature neuronal markers. Although further investigation is needed, these results suggest that more than one cell type from the adult human brain in vitro possesses stem cell-like properties. The origin of these FbCs is yet to be determined, however, leptomeningeal or blood-born mesenchymal precursor (fibrocytes) origin cannot be excluded. Regardless of their origin, these cells provide further evidence for cellular plasticity and possibly provide an alternative in vitro source of adult neural stem cells.

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