31 results for Conference poster, 2013

  • Evaluation of Liquefaction Potential Index (LPI) for Assessing Liquefaction Hazard: A Case Study in Christchurch, New Zealand

    Maurer, B.; Green, R.; Cubrinovski, M.; Bradley, B.A. (2013)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Gene-Environment Interactions in Health Services Utilization and Access to Care

    Basu, A.; Romeis, J.C. (2013)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Systematic ground motion observations in the Canterbury earthquakes

    Bradley, B.A. (2013)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Modelling the Impact of Large Dams on Flows and Hydropower Production of the Sekong, Sesan, and Srepok Rivers in the Mekong Basin

    Cochrane, T.A.; Piman, T.; Arias, M.E. (2013)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Weighted integral rotation and translation for touch interaction

    Lee, G.; Billinghurst, M. (2013)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    Touch based interaction is popular in graphical user interface (GUI) systems, as it provides natural and intuitive direct manipulation. Rotation and translation are basic tasks for manipulating graphical objects and various touch based interaction techniques has been investigated for doing this [Hancock et al. 2006]. In early GUI systems, users had to perform rotation and translation independently by switching between the two manipulation modes either using a menu system or by manipulating different widgets that in many cases make the interface visually cluttered. Recently, two-finger gestures have become common in multi-touch interfaces to perform rotation, translation, and even scaling, simultaneously, without visual clutter. However, there can be ergonomic problems when the user has to rotate objects in large angle [Hoggan et al. 2013], which causes strain on user’s wrist. As a result users tend to split and perform the manipulation in multiple steps, which might not be suitable for certain applications, such as puppeteering based animation tools.

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  • Study of Augmented Gesture Communication Cues and View Sharing in Remote Collaboration

    Kim, S.; Lee, G.; Sakata, N.; Duenser, A.; Vartiainen, E.; Billinghurst, M. (2013)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    In this research, we explore how different types of augmented gesture communication cues can be used under different view sharing techniques in a remote collaboration system. In a pilot study, we compared four conditions: (1) Pointers on Still Image, (2) Pointers on Live Video, (3) Annotation on Still Image, and (4) Annotation on Live Video. Through this study, we found three results. First, users collaborate more efficiently using annotation cues than pointer cues for communicating object position and orientation information. Second, live video becomes more important when quick feedback is needed. Third, the type of gesture cue has more influence on performance and user preference than the type of view sharing method.

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  • A 3D seismic velocity model for Canterbury, New Zealand for broadband ground motion simulation

    Lee, R.L.; Bradley, B.A.; Pettinga, J.R.; Hughes, M.; Graves, R.W. (2013)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    his poster presents the ongoing development of a 3D Canterbury seismic velocity model which will be used in physics-based hybrid broadband ground motion simulation of the 2010-2011 Canterbury earthquakes. Velocity models must sufficiently represent critical aspects of the crustal structure over multiple length scales which will influence the results of the simulations. As a result, numerous sources of data are utilized in order to provide adequate resolution where necessary. Figure 2: (a) Seismic reflection line showing P-wave velocities and significant geologic horizons (Barnes et al. 2011), and (b) Shear wave profiles at 10 locations (Stokoe et al. 2013). Figure 4: Cross sections of the current version of the Canterbury velocity model to depths of 10km as shown in Figure 1: (a) at a constant latitude value of -43.6˚, and (b) at a constant longitude value of 172.64˚. 3. Ground Surface and Geologic Horizon Models Figure 3: (a) Ground surface model derived from numerous available digital elevation models, and (b) Base of the Quaternary sediments derived from structural contours and seismic reflection line elevations. The Canterbury region has a unique and complex geology which likely has a significant impact on strong ground motions, in particular the deep and loose deposits of the Canterbury basin. The Canterbury basin has several implications on seismic wave phenomena such as long period ground motion amplification and wave guide effects. Using a realistic 3D seismic velocity model in physics-based ground motion simulation will implicitly account for such effects and the resultant simulated ground motions can be studied to gain a fundamental understanding of the salient ground motion phenomena which occurred during the Canterbury earthquakes, and the potential for repeat occurrences in the Canterbury region. Figure 1 shows the current model domain as a rectangular area between Lat=[-43.2˚,-44.0˚], and Lon=[171.5˚,173.0˚]. This essentially spans the area between the foot of the Southern Alps in the North West to Banks Peninsula in the East. Currently the model extends to a depth of 50km below sea level.

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  • Sensitivity of predicted liquefaction-induced lateral displacements from the 2010 Darfield and 2011 Christchurch earthquakes

    Robinson, K.; Cubrinovski, M.; Bradley, B.A. (2013)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    Liquefaction-induced lateral spreading in Christchurch and surrounding suburbs during the recent Canterbury Earthquake Sequence (2010-2011) caused significant damage to structures and lifelines located in close proximity to streams and rivers. Simplified methods used in current engineering practice for predicting lateral ground displacements exhibit a high degree of epistemic uncertainty, but provide ‘order of magnitude’ estimates to appraise the hazard. We wish to compare model predictions to field measurements in order to assess the model’s capabilities and limitations with respect to Christchurch conditions. The analysis presented focuses on the widely-used empirical model of Youd et al. (2002), developed based on multi-linear regression (MLR) of case history data from lateral spreading occurrence in Japan and the US. Two issues arising from the application of this model to Christchurch were considered: • Small data set of Standard Penetration Test (SPT) and soil gradation indices (fines content FC, and mean grain size, D50) required for input. We attempt to use widely available CPT data with site specific correlations to FC and D50. • Uncertainty associated with the model input parameters and their influence on predicted displacements. This has been investigated for a specific location through a sensitivity analysis.

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  • A comparison of ground motions and first-hand experience of the 2011 Mw6.3 Christchurch, New Zealand and 2011 Mw9.0 Tohoku, Japan earthquakes

    Bradley, B.A. (2013)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    This poster provides a comparison between the strong ground motions observed in the 22 February 2011 Mw6.3 Christchurch earthquake with those observed in Tokyo during the 11 March 2011 Mw9.0 Tohoku earthquake. The destuction resulting from both of these events has been well documented, although tsunami was the principal cause of damage in the latter event, and less attention has been devoted to the impact of earthquake-induced ground motions. Despite Tokyo being located over 100km from the nearest part of the causative rupture, the ground motions observed from the Tohoku earthquake were significant enough to cause structural damage and also significant liquefaction to loose reclaimed soils in Tokyo Bay. The author was fortunate enough (from the perspective of an earthquake engineer) to experience first-hand both of these events. Following the Tohoku event, the athor conducted various ground motion analyses and reconniassance of the Urayasu region in Tokyo Bay affected by liquefaction in collaboration with Prof. Kenji Ishihara. This conference is therefore a fitting opportunity in which to discuss some of authors insights obtained as a result of this first hand knowledge. Figure 1 illustrates the ground motions recorded in the Christchurch CBD in the 22 February 2011 and 4 September 2010 earthquakes, with that recorded in Tokyo Bay in the 11 March 2011 Tohoku earthquake. It is evident that these three ground motions vary widely in their amplitude and duration. The CBGS ground motion from the 22 February 2011 event has a very large amplitude (nearly 0.6g) and short duration (approx. 10s of intense shaking), as a result of the causal Mw6.3 rupture at short distance (Rrup=4km). The CBGS ground motion from the 4 September 2010 earthquake has a longer duration (approx. 30s of intense shaking), but reduced acceleration amplitude, as a result of the causal Mw7.1 rupture at a short-to-moderate distance (Rrup=14km). Finally, the Urayasu ground motion in Tokyo bay during the 11 March 2011 Tohoku earthquake exhibits an acceleration amplitude similar to the 4 September 2010 CBGS ground motion, but a significantly larger duration (approx 150s of intense shaking). Clearly, these three different ground motions will affect structures and soils in different ways depending on the vibration characteristics of the structures/soil, and the potential for strength and stiffness degradation due to cumulative effects. Figure 2 provides a comparison between the arias intensities of the several ground motion records from the three different events. It can be seen that the arias intensities of the ground motions in the Christchurch CBD from the 22 February 2011 earthquake (which is on average AI=2.5m/s) is approximately twice that from the 4 September 2010 earthquake (average AI≈1.25). This is consistent with a factor of approximately 1.6 obtained by Cubrinovski et al. (2011) using the stress-based (i.e.PGA-MSF) approach of liquefaction triggering. It can also be seen that the arias intensity of the ground motions recorded in Tokyo during the 2011 Tohoku earthquake are larger than ground motions in the Christchurch CBD from the 4 September 2011 earthquake, but smaller than those of the 22 February 2011 earthquake. Based on the arias intensity liquefaction triggering approach it can therefore be concluded that the ground motion severity, in terms of liquefaction potential, for the Tokyo ground motions is between those ground motions in Christchurch CBD from the 4 September 2010 and 22 February 2011 events.

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  • Live & Web-based Parcel Monitoring with Low-cost Sensors

    Bröring, A.; Delikostidis, I.; Fries, K.; Heitmann, S.; Koalick, S.; Krüger, T. (2013)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • We make a difference: Learning communities in physical education

    McBain, S. (2013)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    The implementation of the 1999 Health and Physical Education in the New Zealand Curriculum (HPE) and the 2007 New Zealand Curriculum (NZC) required a substantial paradigm shift (Stothart, 2000) from scientised or technocratic views of physical education (Culpan, 1996/97) to a socio-critical humanism. • These difficulties raised questions about how teachers develop physical education classes that can utilise pedagogies to implement the philosophical intent of the NZC (2007). The research question was: Do teachers of physical education establish classes as learning communities? If so how? This study was situated within the interpretative paradigm; a qualitative case study • Data was collected by employing semi structure interviews with 4 physical education teachers. One teacher was selected for observation of classes and focus group interviews with 6 students from a year 9 class were conducted. Data analysis was conducted using the constant comparative method. From the data collection 3 significant themes developed: a) Characteristics of an altruistic class communities b) The pedagogies c) Characteristics of a learning community

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  • Testing of Lead Extrusion Damping Devices Undergoing Representative Earthquake Velocities

    Rodgers, G.W.; Chase, J.G.; Heaton, D.; Cleeve, L. (2013)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    In recent years, significant research has been undertaken into the development of lead-extrusion damping technology. The high force-to-volume (HF2V) devices developed at the University of Canterbury have been the subject of much of this research. However, while these devices have undergone a limited range of velocity testing, limitations in test equipment has meant that they have never been tested at representative earthquake velocities. Such testing is important as the peak resistive force provided by the dampers under large velocity spikes is an important design input that must be known for structural applications. This manuscript presents the high-speed testing of HF2V devices with quasi-static force capacities of 250-300kN. These devices have been subjected to peak input velocities of approximately 200mm/s, producing peak resistive forces of approximately 350kN. The devices show stable hysteretic performance, with slight force reduction during high-speed testing due to heat build-up and softening of the lead working material. This force reduction is recovered following cyclic loading as heat is dissipated and the lead hardens again. The devices are shown to be only weakly velocity dependent, an advantage in that they do not deliver large forces to the connecting elements and surrounding structure if larger than expected response velocities occur. This high-speed testing is an important step towards uptake as it provides important information to designers.

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  • Human response to earthquake shaking: Analysis of video footage of the 2010-2011 Christchurch earthquake sequence

    Lambie, E.; Wilson, T.; Johnston, D.; Jensen, S.; Brogt, E. (2013)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Data management plans: what are they and how libraries can help.

    Angelo, Anton; Lund, Peter. (2013)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    Formal data management plans (DMPs) are becoming required for projects funded through UK and EU sources. Data sets are increasingly being expected to accompany papers in order to encourage re-analysis and scholarly transparency, and DMPs outline expectations of how datasets will be presented as final research outputs. Considerations for a DMP include : format, privacy, licensing and re-use restrictions, archiving, persistent identification and compliance to funder’s and institutional policies. Support for researchers creating DMPs can come from collaboration between University librarians, research support offices and ICT departments to create services that fit research needs. Some Universities (Duke University, M.I.T., Edinburgh, Oxford) now have data librarians to support this work. At University of Canterbury we are investigating how UC Library can support researchers in development of DMPs. Up-skilling and advocacy will be required in order for Libraries to provide Library Guides, training and advice. Promotion in the research community will be crucial.

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  • Impacts of Hydrological Alterations to the Tonle Sap Ecosystem of the Mekong River Basin

    Arias, M.E.; Cochrane, T.A. (2013)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    • The Tonle Sap is the largest wetland and fishery in the Mekong but it is expected to be affected by hydropower and climate change • Landscape-scale spatial distribution of habitats were found to be largely driven by flood duration patterns. • The flood-pulse hydrology could explain most of the underlying variability in soil and vegetation field-scale characteristics. • Hydropower could cause distinct seasonal changes, while climate change could increase inter-annual uncertainty. • Fauna species richness was found to be greatest in natural habitats likely to experience the most significant disruptions

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  • Wind power in New Zealand Renewable energy resource dynamics in a hydro-based power system

    Suomalainen, Anna-Kristiina; Pritchard, G; Sharp, Basil; Yuan, Z; Zakeri, G (2013-12-02)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Monitoring the health of New Zealand???s young people: A decade of surveillance research

    Clark, TC; Fleming, T; Bullen, P; Crengle, S; Denny, S; Dyson, B; Peiris John, R; Robinson, E; Rossen, F; Sheridan, J; Teevale, T; Utter, J; Fortune, S; Lewycka, S (2013)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Detection of tissue- and sex-specific gene expression in Bos taurus using high depth RNA sequencing

    Lopdell, Thomas; Littlejohn, M (2013-08-13)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The development of online learning environments (OLEs) at The University of Auckland Library: collaboration, integration and usability testing

    Zdravkovic, Neda (2013-04-09)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    In order to meet the learning needs of a large number of in-house, flexible learning and distance-learning students from a variety of disciplines, The University of Auckland Library has enhanced the provision of information and academic literacy instruction through the design of online learning environments. Learning Services Librarians, learning designers and subject librarians from The University of Auckland Library have collaborated with faculty, Centre for Academic Development staff, graphic design professionals and web developers to design online courses and tutorials, such as: ??? Academic Integrity - stand-alone online academic integrity course, compulsory for all new students at the University of Auckland from Semester I 2013; ??? COMLAW 101: New Zealand???s Legal Framework - curriculum- integrated information literacy online tutorial designed for COMLAW 101: Law in a Business Environment academic course with 2000 students each year; ??? POPLHLTH 701: Research Methods in Health - curriculum- integrated online information literacy learning environment for postgraduate students completing the POPLHLTH 701: Research Methods in Health course and compulsory assessment activity bearing 15% course mark; ??? FTVMS 100: Assignment Research Path ??? curriculum-integrated information literacy online tutorial and compulsory assessment activity (10% course mark) designed for FTVMS 100: Media studies first year undergraduate course with 1000 students each year; ??? Understanding Your Reading List - generic information literacy online tutorial designed for all first year undergraduate students. The focus of the paper will be on the development framework of online courses, curriculum-integrated and generic tutorials and the analysis of different stages of each project, their collaborative nature and usability testing practices applied (user observation, focus group interviews, surveys) and outcomes. It will introduce CourseBuilder as a web-based tool for the design of online learning environments and activities, its features, functionalities and published outputs. CourseBuilder, developed by the University of Auckland???s Centre for Academic Development, is an authoring tool that provides customisable templates to develop online interactive activities (eg, case studies, reflections and quizzes), import text, insert media, monitor student responses and more. Finally the paper will describe issues and challenges during each development stage, as well as benefits and limitations of using an online learning environment development system.

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  • The Effect of Glycosylation on the Potency of Pramlintide, An Anti-Diabetic Drug

    Fletcher, Madeleine; Kowalczyk, Renata; Fairbanks, A; Brimble, Margaret; Hay, DL (2013-12-18)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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