15 results for Conference poster, 2016

  • Are doctoral theses changing over time?

    Brailsford, Ian; Sowden, Elizabeth; Orioli Figueira, Brigida (2016-04-22)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    This poster presents longitudinal data on the length and chapter composition of 800 doctoral theses deposited at the University of Auckland between 2008 and 2015. Over this period, the doctoral statute has been amended to allow for more flexibility in the format of a thesis submitted for examination, such as the inclusion of creative practice and peer-reviewed publications. In addition, the funding mechanisms for doctorates in New Zealand have put a premium on candidates completing in a timely fashion. Given these two contexts we speculated that the length of an average doctoral thesis would be declining over time. One hundred doctoral theses – overwhelmingly PhD theses with a smattering of name doctorates –deposited in the University Library from each calendar year were randomly selected to assess: the number of pages; chapter composition; and inclusion of published papers within the thesis. These data were then correlated against academic faculty to tease out variations across the disciplines. Overall, our findings indicate that the doctoral thesis has remained relatively stable in length and chapter structure.

    View record details
  • Pride and Prejudice: Social Workers’ Experiences of the Profession

    Staniforth, Barbara; Beddoe, L (2016-06-28)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    View record details
  • Diagnostic Utility of a Next Generation Sequencing Retinal Panel in a Māori and Polynesian population with Inherited Retinal Disease

    Vincent, Andrea; Coysh, A; van Bysterveldt, K; Oliver, Verity; Black, G (2016-05-03)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    View record details
  • Radiofrequency ablation of osteoid osteoma - aiming for zero recurrence

    Doyle, Anthony; Graydon, A; French, JG; Hanlon, M (2016-04-30)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Over a 13 year period, a single radiologist (AJD) performed radiofrequency ablation (RFA)of osteoid osteoma in 32 patients. The lesions were located mostly in the lower extremities (femur N=15, tibia N=9) and spine (N=5). Lesion size varied from 4 to 18 mm, average 10 mm. Patient age ranged from 5 to 23 years, average 14 years. All but two had RFA as their primary treatment, with two treated after surgical excision had resulted in recurrence. CT guidance was used for all procedures, performed under general anaesthetic. A variety of different radiofrequency generators and probes were used. No complications occurred. None of the patients showed any signs of recurrence and none required further intervention. Although the followup period varied (and a few patients were lost to followup after a few weeks), most of the patients were followed for at least 12 months post procedure, with maximum followup seven years. We conclude that, with careful technique, the recurrence rate for RFA of osteoid osteoma can approach zero. Details of technique are discussed in the poster itself.

    View record details
  • What should be stored in Biobanks? Using computational modelling to unravel genotype to phenotype linkage

    Cooling, Michael; Atalag, Koray (2016-10-31)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    View record details
  • An optimal sampling schedule for neonates, infants & children receiving cefazolin +/- vancomycin for cardiopulmonary bypass

    Sturge, Jacqueline; Anderson, Brian; Holford, Nicholas (2016-08-22)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background: Dosing of prophylactic antibiotics in children during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) remains poorly defined. Pharmacokinetic (PK) studies can be improved using optimal design when sampling is limited, or multiple factors influence PK. We aimed to optimize a sampling schedule designed to determine cefazolin and vancomycin PK in children undergoing CPB. Methods: A one compartment distribution model for vancomycin and a three compartment distribution model for cefazolin was used with theory based allometric scaling and maturation to describe first-order elimination clearance. The CPB circuit was represented by an additional compartment. We assumed 60 subjects received cefazolin 50 mg.kg-1, with 50 of these subjects undergoing a procedure with CPB. We assumed 15 subjects also received 15 mg.kg-1 vancomycin. Optimal times for up to 8 samples per patient were estimated, ignoring CPB effects, using WinPOPT (University of Otago, New Zealand). Optimal sampling times for determination of CPB related changes were considered separately. Designs were selected based on relative standard errors (RSEs) for model parameters and comparison of criterions summarizing design efficiency. Results: Sample times were 0.001, 0.001, 0.108, 0.36, 1.05, 1.85 h following the first dose, and 0.36 and 2.5 h after the second dose, for With CPB subjects. Sample times were 0.127, 0.43, 0.43, 1.3, 3.18, 6, 6 h after the first dose and 6 h after the second dose, for Without CPB subjects. Five samples, taken directly from the CPB circuit, were required to adequately capture CPB related changes in CPB V and CL. RSE estimates of cefazolin, vancomycin and CPB circuit parameters for the final design were ≤ 30%, with the exception of one of the cefazolin volumes (V2) for which RSEs were 49%. Conclusion: The sampling schedule may be used in the planning of a clinical study of children receiving cefazolin and vancomycin during CPB.

    View record details
  • Considering clinical protocols and guidelines: what lessons for IPE?

    Barrow, Mark; Gasquoine, S (2016-08-30)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background: Interprofessional collaboration is enhanced if professionals work across discursive boundaries. While interprofessional education interventions may encourage this the practice environment may militate against the implementation of understandings developed in educational settings. Summary of work: Interviews with doctors and nurses highlighted differences between each professions’ views of clinical protocols and guidelines. This prompted us to conduct a critical discourse analysis of a number of clinical guidelines and the systems which guide their development and approval. Summary of results: Our analysis shows a range of discourses at work within clinical protocols régimes. Development and approval systems are dominated by collectivist discourses emphasising communication and collaboration within rigid bureaucratic systems. The protocols exemplify a neo-liberal discourse where people who are the objects of care are positioned as clients or consumers amenable to standardised aliquots of diagnosis and care, the level of which can be justified on the basis of scoring systems and claims related to a ‘scientific’ evidence base. The régimes also suggests (perhaps falsely) flattened hierarchical structures, a democratising discourse where all professional voices are equal in the provision of care. Discussion: A nursing identity relies on experience, holistic views of patients and collective approaches to practice. The medical identity is based on craft-based development of expertise associated with generating distinctive and sometime idiosyncratic responses to a patient’s needs. Each comes to protocols with different ‘agenda’. Conclusions: The collectivist discourse of protocol development does not seem to carry through to their utilisation. Protocols appear to act as objects that reinforce discursive boundaries between the groups. Take-home messages: Educators need to consider the effect of protocols on practice and account for this in the design of educational interventions. Understanding the discursive roll of protocols might help educators design more robust IPE programmes.

    View record details
  • Similar estimates of contrast sensitivity and acuity from psychophysics and automated analysis of optokinetic nystagmus

    Dakin, Steven; Turnbull, Philip (2016-05-14)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Although the contrast sensitivity function (CSF) is a particularly useful way of characterising functional vision, its psychophysical measurement relies on observers being able to make reliable perceptual reports. This can be challenging e.g. when testing children. Here we describe a system for measuring the CSF without observer-report using an automated analysis of optokinetic nystagmus (OKN), an oscillatory eye movement made in response to moving stimuli (here, spatial-frequency - SF - band-pass noise). We show that predicting perceived direction using the proportion of eye movements that are consistent with OKN in the stimulus direction allows us to make an unbiased estimate of contrast sensitivity across SF. We next compare CSFs of 25 observers derived using either OKN or perceptual report. Both approaches yield near-identical CSFs that capture subtle inter-observer variations in acuity (R=0.80, p< 0.0001) and contrast sensitivity (R=0.80, p< 0.0001) amongst observers with ostensibly normal vision. A trial-by-trial analysis reveals that, even when observers' perceptual report is at chance, there is a very high correlation between our OKN-derived measure and observers' perceptual report. This indicates that OKN and self-report are likely tapping into a common neural mechanism providing further support for the proposal that OKN is a valid alternative to the current gold standard measures of CSF based on perceptual report. We discuss how our approach can be paired with an efficient psychophysical method to derive rapid automated measures of the CSF and other measures of functional vision.

    View record details
  • Phagocytosis by human brain pericytes: implications for Alzheimer’s disease

    Rustenhoven, Justin; Scotter, Emma; Smyth, L; Park, In; Curtis, Maurice; Faull, Richard; Graham, S; Dragunow, Michael (2016-06-15)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    View record details
  • Condicoes de saude dos menores de 5 anos Pataxo, Minas Gerais, Brasil

    Santos, AP; Leite, MS; Conde, WL; Franco, MCP; Castro, TG (2016-10-29)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Introdução: O quadro de saúde dos povos indígenas no Brasil é complexo e dinâmico, está relacionado ao processo histórico de mudanças econômicas, sociais e ambientais (Santos & Coimbra Jr., 2003). Altas prevalências de déficit estatural (25,7%) tem acometido as crianças indígenas brasileiras e diarreia e infecção respiratória aguda sao apontadas como as maiores causas de internação hospitalar notificada (Horta et al., 2013; Leite et al., 2013; Coimbra et al., 2013). Objetivo: Dentre os menores de 5 anos Pataxo de Minas Gerais: 1) descrever características de nascimento, situação vacinal, acompanhamento do pre-natal e do crescimento e desenvolvimento, perfil de morbidades e acessos aos serviços de saúde; 2) verificar associacoes entre estado nutricional e condicoes de saude observadas. Metodologia: Estudo epidemiológico de base populacional, natureza transversal, com dados coletados em 2011 entre os Pataxó de Minas Gerais. Foram avaliadas 34 crianças (< 5 anos) residentes em 5 aldeias do povo Pataxó, localizadas nos município de Carmésia, Itapecerica e Açucena. A avaliação da situação de saúde utilizou questionário estruturado baseado no Primeiro Inquérito Nacional de Saúde e Nutrição dos Povos Indígenas (Cardoso et al., 2009). A aferição das medidas antropométricas (peso, estatura/comprimento e circunferência da cintura) foi realizada de acordo com as recomendações da Organização Mundial da Saúde. O presente estudo foi aprovado pelo comitê de ética da Universidade Federal de São Paulo pela Comissão Nacional de Ética em Pesquisa. Foram calculadas freqüências de variáveis categóricas e médias (desvios-padrão) e medianas das variáveis contínuas. Para a identificação de diferenças entre as médias utilizou o teste t de Student, enquanto proporções foram comparadas pelo teste do qui-quadrado de Pearson, adotando-se P< 0,05. Utilizou-se o programa SPSS (17.0) para analise dos dados. Resultados: Entre os menores de 5 anos, 55,9% eram do sexo feminino e 44,1% tinham idade inferior a 24 meses. A maioria das crianças nasceu no hospital, e 82,4% das maes tiveram 6 ou mais consultas de pre-natal. Mais de 80% das mesmas estavam com o esquema vacinal em dia a época da pesquisa e havia tomado a megadose de vitamina A. Apenas 8,8% das crianças tinham o registro do acompanhamento do crescimento no último mês anterior a pesquisa. A prevalência de hospitalização nos últimos 12 meses foi de 23,5%, mas nenhuma internação foi devida a infecções respiratórias e apenas uma criança foi internada com diarreia. Ocorrência de diarreia na última semana foi relatada para 17,6% das crianças e tosse para 35,3%. Devido ao fato dos déficits estaturais e ponderais serem inexistentes nesta população e o excesso de peso ter acometido somente uma das crianças, não foi possível verificar a distribuição dos distúrbios nutricionais de acordo com as variáveis independentes, de forma a verificar-se possíveis associações. Conclusões: Comparado com a populacao de criancas indigenas brasileiras, alguns indicadores de saude entre os Pataxo tiveram melhor desempenho, como a baixa prevalência de internação hospitalar reportada para diarreia e IRAs, a alta cobertura vacinal e o percentual de gestantes que tiverm 6 ou mais consultas pre-natal. No entanto, melhorias na periodicidade de acompanhamento do crescimento e desenvolvimento sao necessarias.

    View record details
  • Lower Limb Estimation from Sparse Landmarks using an Articulated Shape Model

    Zhang, Ju; Hislop-Jambrich, J; Besier, Thor (2016-02-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Rapid generation of lower limb musculoskeletal models is essential for patient-specific gait modeling. Motion-capture is a routine part of gait assessment but contains relatively sparse geometric information. We present an articulated statistical shape model of the lower limb that estimates realistic bone geometry, pose, and muscle attachment regions from seven commonly used motion-capture markers. Our method obtained a lower (p=0.02) surface error of 4.5 mm RMS compared to 8.5 mm RMS using standard isotropic scaling, and was more robust, converging in all 26 test cases compared to 20 for isotropic scaling.

    View record details
  • Paternal depression during pregnancy and after childbirth: evidence from Growing Up in New Zealand

    Underwood, Lisa; Atatoa Carr, P; Berry, S; Grant, Cameron; Peterson, Elizabeth; Waldie, Karen; Morton, Susan (2016-07-06)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background: There is little evidence on depression among men whose partners are pregnant or have recently given birth. Methods: An ethnically and socioeconomically diverse sample of 3528 men living in New Zealand completed interviews during their partner's pregnancy and nine months after the birth of their child. Depression symptoms were measured using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) and the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). Rates of depression (defined as EPDS>12 and PHQ-9>9) and associations with a range of paternal and maternal characteristics were explored using logistic regression. Results: Antenatal paternal depression, which affected 2.3% of fathers, was associated with paternal perceived stress (OR=1.4, 95%CI 1.3 to 1.5) and fair to poor paternal health (OR=2, 95%CI 1.1 to 3.5) during their partner's pregnancy. Postnatal paternal depression affected 4.3% of fathers and was associated with paternal perceived stress in pregnancy (OR=1.12, 95%CI 1.1 to 1.2), relationship status at nine months after childbirth (OR=5.6, 95%CI 2 to 15.7), fair to poor paternal health at nine months (OR=3.3, 95%CI 2 to 5.1), employment status at nine months (OR=1.8, 95%CI 1.1 to 3.1) and a past history of depression (OR=2.8, 95%CI 1.7 to 4.7). Conclusions: Expectant fathers are at risk of depression if they feel stressed or are in poor health. In this study, rates of depression were higher during the postpartum period and were associated with adverse social and relationship factors. Identifying who is most at-risk of paternal depression and when will help inform interventions to help men and their families.

    View record details
  • Who are Today's Dads?

    Underwood, Lisa; Atatoa Carr, P; Berry, S; Grant, Cameron; Kingi, TK; Pryor, J; Nicholson, J; Verbiest, Marjolein; Morton, Susan (2016-07-06)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Dads play a crucial role in the lives of children. Who Are Today’s Dads? is a University of Auckland project related to the Growing Up in New Zealand study. We want to find out how dads shape their children’s early development, health and wellbeing. The “dads” of more than 5,000 6 year olds were invited to take part in an online questionnaire. We are interested in all “dads” not just those who are the biological fathers of their children but also step-dads, foster and/or adoptive parents, co-mums and other family members who fulfil a dad role. Another important focus of the study is the extent to which New Zealand children experience changes in “dads”. We will explore the diversity of individuals who are father figures to contemporary New Zealand children with a focus on their work, parent–child relationship and how engaged dads are with their Growing Up in New Zealand child. Our aim is to determine how current and future policy can be developed to enhance the role that modern “dads” can play to contribute positively to children’s early development.

    View record details
  • Loop closure and kinase selectivity in lung cancer

    Yosaatmadja, Yuliana; Squire, Christopher (2016-07-17)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Somatic mutations in tyrosine kinase receptors that causes aberrant signalling have been implicated in the development of lung cancer. Two such receptors, EGFR and FGFR kinases are directly involved in many cases of aggressive metastasis and drug resistance. The FGFR kinase family consists of four highly conserved receptor proteins (FGFR1 – FGFR4). FGFR pathways are the main cause of resistance to chemotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer patients, and 22% of them show over-expression of FGFR1. There are a number of small molecules in phase III clinical trials that target not only FGFR but also other kinases. A wide range of EGFR mutations are linked to lung cancer development in never-smokers or former smokers. The two most common mutations are exon 19 deletions and the point mutation L858R in exon 21. Many patients harbouring L858R acquire a secondary T790M mutation after treatment with gefitinib/erlotinib resulting in drug resistance. In the past few years AstraZeneca have developed drugs that target specific proteins, eg; AZD4547 (FGFR1 selective) and AZD9291 (selectivity for T790M/L858R EGFR). In an effort to design our own novel and selective inhibitors, we solved the structures of AZD4547 and AZD9291 in complex with FGFR and EGFR respectively. In both cases, the phosphate binding loop (P-loop) of the proteins forms an unusual “bent” structure wrapped closely around these inhibitors. We speculate that the ability of these compounds to induce P-loop closure is an important part of their respective selectivity mechanisms.

    View record details
  • Investigations At Hi-SEAS into Team Function and Performance on Long Duration Exploration Missions

    Binsted, KA; Basner, M; Bedwell, W; Caldwell, Bryan; Chang, D; Hunter, J; Kozlowski, S; Nasrini, J; Roma, P; Santoro, J; Seibert, M; Shiro, B; Wu, P (2016-02-09)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    HI-SEAS HI-SEAS (Hawaii Space Exploration Analog and Simulation, www.hi-seas.org) is a habitat on an isolated Mars-like site on the Mauna Loa side of the saddle area on the Big Island of Hawaii at approximately 8200 feet above sea level. HI-SEAS is unique, in addition to its setting in a distinctive analog environment, as: - we select the crew to meet our research needs (in contrast, at serendipitous analogs, such as Antarctic stations, crew selection criteria are not controlled by researchers); - the conditions (habitat, mission, communications, etc.) are explicitly designed to be similar to those of a planetary exploration mission; - the site is accessible year round, allowing longer-duration isolated and confined environment studies than at other locations; - the Mars-like environment offers the potential for analog tasks, such as geological field work by human explorers and/or robots. The ability to select crew members to meet research needs and isolate them in a managed simulation performing under specific mission profiles makes HI-SEAS ideal for detailed studies in space-flight crew dynamics, behaviors, roles and performance, especially for long-duration missions. MISSIONS TO DATE As of February 2016, there have been three missions completed at HI-SEAS, two of four months in length, and one of eight months. The fourth mission, which is twelve months long, is currently under way, and will end in August 2016. UPCOMING MISSIONS The next cycle of missions will see the research focus at HI-SEAS shift from crew cohesion and performance to crew composition. We expect the first of three eight-month missions to start in late 2016. CURRENT RESEARCH The current research projects being carried out at HI-SEAS focus on crew cohesion, function and performance. Preliminary results from each of these projects are being presented in detail by the co-authors separately at this meeting. This presentation will provide an overview of the research conducted to date, and the plans for the future. OPPORTUNISTIC RESEARCH In order to maximize research return, and to provide HI-SEAS crews with a realistic workload, we welcome proposals for opportunistic research to be carried out during HI-SEAS missions. Proposed projects must a) advance human space exploration by addressing NASA’s needs and requirements; b) require a long-duration analog for desired research outcomes; and c) not confound the primary research. If you are interested in submitting an opportunistic research proposal, please contact the first author.

    View record details