231 results for Conference poster

  • Paternal depression during pregnancy and after childbirth: evidence from Growing Up in New Zealand

    Underwood, Lisa; Atatoa Carr, P; Berry, S; Grant, Cameron; Peterson, Elizabeth; Waldie, Karen; Morton, Susan (2016-07-06)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background: There is little evidence on depression among men whose partners are pregnant or have recently given birth. Methods: An ethnically and socioeconomically diverse sample of 3528 men living in New Zealand completed interviews during their partner's pregnancy and nine months after the birth of their child. Depression symptoms were measured using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) and the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). Rates of depression (defined as EPDS>12 and PHQ-9>9) and associations with a range of paternal and maternal characteristics were explored using logistic regression. Results: Antenatal paternal depression, which affected 2.3% of fathers, was associated with paternal perceived stress (OR=1.4, 95%CI 1.3 to 1.5) and fair to poor paternal health (OR=2, 95%CI 1.1 to 3.5) during their partner's pregnancy. Postnatal paternal depression affected 4.3% of fathers and was associated with paternal perceived stress in pregnancy (OR=1.12, 95%CI 1.1 to 1.2), relationship status at nine months after childbirth (OR=5.6, 95%CI 2 to 15.7), fair to poor paternal health at nine months (OR=3.3, 95%CI 2 to 5.1), employment status at nine months (OR=1.8, 95%CI 1.1 to 3.1) and a past history of depression (OR=2.8, 95%CI 1.7 to 4.7). Conclusions: Expectant fathers are at risk of depression if they feel stressed or are in poor health. In this study, rates of depression were higher during the postpartum period and were associated with adverse social and relationship factors. Identifying who is most at-risk of paternal depression and when will help inform interventions to help men and their families.

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  • Investigation into the racemic X-ray structure of the antimicrobial protein snakin-1

    Yeung, Ho; Yosaatmadja, Yuliana; Squire, Christopher; Harris, Paul; Baker, Edward; Brimble, Margaret (2015-10-22)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Gelation of oxidised cereal beta-glucan extracts

    Mohan, Anand (2014-02-21)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Cereal β-glucan, which occurs in plant cell walls, is the major component of soluble dietary fiber in oat and barley. Soluble fibers with a high solution viscosity, which is positively correlated to molecular weight (MW), lower the serum glucose and cholesterol levels. The relevant health claims on β-glucan as a functional food have been allowed by regulatory authorities, including the EFSA and the US FDA. In most processed-food systems, the native hydrolytic enzymes are inactivated, but oxidative degradation of this non-starch polysaccharide can, however, adversely affect the claimed health benefits. (Kivelä 2011). Although the physiological benefits are positively correlated with the viscosity of β-glucan, the relationship with its gelling capacity is not fully understood. The scope of the Master’s thesis included (1) the study of gelation characteristics of oxidised solutions of oat and barley β-glucan, and (2) correlating the results obtained by dynamic light scattering (DLS) microrheology with conventional rheology.

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  • Is keratoconus a case of matrix remodelling gone crazy?

    Brookes, Nigel; Loh, IP; Clover, GM; Poole, CA; Sherwin, Trevor (2002)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Forbidden crystals: Penrose tiling with molecules

    Nam, SJ; Waterhouse, GIN; Ware, David; Brothers, Penelope (2015-02-08)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Since the first discovery of quasicrystals by mathematicians in the 1960s, quasicrystalline patterns which possess unusual symmetric orders have become an issue among mathematicians. Observation of 5-fold crystal symmetry in metal alloys in 1984 has attracted other scientists. Penrose tiling is the simplest quasicrystal comprised of only pentagon motifs. Although quasicrystals have been observed in alloys and soft matter states (polymers, colloids), no one has yet successfully generated full molecular quasicrystals. Only small pieces of molecular Penrose tiling have been reported. We are working on this challenge by using molecules with 5-fold symmetry as molecular ‘tiles’ to create 2-dimensional molecular Penrose tilings. Alignment of the tiles is the key to creating the quasicrystalline pattern. Possible candidates as tiles which must be synthetically accessible are croconate and its derivatives, macrocycles such as campestarene and supramolecules such as cucurbituril. The techniques of coordination and supramolecular chemistry will direct the ordering of the tiles. After deposition of the synthesised tiles on substrates, surface imaging (STM and AFM) and analytical techniques (XPS, LEED, GI-SAXS) will be used to investigate the resulting films.

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  • Radiofrequency ablation of osteoid osteoma - aiming for zero recurrence

    Doyle, Anthony; Graydon, A; French, JG; Hanlon, M (2016-04-30)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Over a 13 year period, a single radiologist (AJD) performed radiofrequency ablation (RFA)of osteoid osteoma in 32 patients. The lesions were located mostly in the lower extremities (femur N=15, tibia N=9) and spine (N=5). Lesion size varied from 4 to 18 mm, average 10 mm. Patient age ranged from 5 to 23 years, average 14 years. All but two had RFA as their primary treatment, with two treated after surgical excision had resulted in recurrence. CT guidance was used for all procedures, performed under general anaesthetic. A variety of different radiofrequency generators and probes were used. No complications occurred. None of the patients showed any signs of recurrence and none required further intervention. Although the followup period varied (and a few patients were lost to followup after a few weeks), most of the patients were followed for at least 12 months post procedure, with maximum followup seven years. We conclude that, with careful technique, the recurrence rate for RFA of osteoid osteoma can approach zero. Details of technique are discussed in the poster itself.

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  • Can we minimize androgen deprivation therapy-related quality of life effects in Māori & Pacific prostate cancer survivors using a genetic stratification?

    Karunasinghe, N; Zhu, Y; Han, Dug; Lange, K; Wang, A; Zhu, Shuotun; Masters, J; Goudie, M; Keogh, J; Benjamin, B; Holmes, M; Ferguson, Lynnette (2015-11-15)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    BACKGROUND: Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is an effective palliation treatment for men with advanced prostate cancer (PC). This is a common treatment received by the majority of PC survivors among New Zealand (NZ) Maori men due to their late presentation of the disease. However, ADT have well documented side effects that could alter the patient’s quality of life (QoL). ADT involves suppression of androgens produced either by the testes or the adrenal gland or both. Adrenal androgen production involves conversion of androstenedione to testosterone by the aldo-keto reductase 1C3 (AKR1C3) enzyme. We have previously reported that the AKR1C3 rs12529 G allele is associated with a lower prostate specific antigen (PSA) level, which is a downstream product of androgens binding to the androgen receptor. The AKR1C3 rs12529 G allele frequency is 14.2% higher among Māori, Pacific and East Asian men compared to Caucasians in our study cohort. Therefore, the current assessment is to evaluate whether genetic stratification with the AKR1C3 rs12529 polymorphism could support decision making on ADT to minimize QoL effects. METHODS: A patient cohort with confirmed clinical diagnoses of PC was recruited with written consent from 2006-2014 to Urology studies carried out at the Auckland Cancer Society Research Centre, University of Auckland, NZ. Recruitment was carried out at hospitals managed under three District Health Boards of Auckland, and private Urology clinics from Waikato District, in NZ. From May 2013, patients were invited to complete a questionnaire that contained options for selecting PC treatment type/s received and a QoL survey. The primary outcomes were the percentage scores under each QoL subscale assessed using the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer quality of life questionnaires (EORTC QLQ-C30 and PR25). Genotyping of these men for the AKR1C3 rs12529 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was carried out using the Sequenom MassArray and iPlex system or the Applied Biosystem’s Taqman SNP genotyping procedure. Age at diagnosis, Gleason score and alcohol consumption were confounding variables between ADT and no ADT groups, and were corrected for subsequent analysis. Analysis of QoL scores were carried out against ADT duration or in association with the AKR1C3 rs12529 SNP using the Generalised Linear Model. P-values <0.02]. This increase among the rs12529 GG genotype (9.7) is therefore, equivalent to 59% of the mean hormone treatment-related symptom score of 16.5 (SD16.6) recorded in this study. INTERPRETATION: As 85.3% ADT recipients have used AA the current study is best interpreted as QoL effects of AAs. This study suggests a possibility for those stratified with the AKR1C3 rs12529 G allele to receive intermittent AA treatment to minimize QoL effects. If larger prospective studies can confirm these findings, PC survivors particularly those of Maori and Pacific ethnic groups may greatly benefit through optimal ADT options not only for their survival benefits, but also to better maintain their QoL.

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  • Impact of conjugate pneumococcal vaccine on nasopharyngeal S.pneumoniae serotypes and antibiotic susceptibility over 7 years

    Best, Emma; Taylor, S; Tse, F; McBride, C; Stewart, Joanna; Lennon, Diana; Trenholme, A (2015-03-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Applying threshold concepts to unlock the ‘hidden’ core of a multifaceted health sciences curriculum

    Petersen, L; Egan, John; Barrow, Mark (2015-07-07)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Title: Applying threshold concepts to unlock the ‘hidden’ core of a multifaceted health sciences curriculum Background/context: In 2014, a curriculum implementation plan was developed to comprehensively map the existing Bachelor of Health Sciences (BHSc) curriculum so as to inform a cohesive workforce-related vision for the future. However, prior to mapping the curriculum, staff first needed to agree upon what the future-focused set of graduate capabilities across their diverse programme should be. To do so, we applied Meyer and Land’s (2003) notion of threshold concepts to enable us to unpack and clarify what felt like a complex, and at times hidden, core curriculum. Research/evaluation method: The existing BHSc programme was analysed using the frame of threshold concepts through a series of staff and student focus group sessions. This led to a refining of six central threshold concepts for the degree. This in turn informed the revision of a set of programme-wide graduate capabilities. Pre-review course outlines (n=24) and assessments (n=104) were analysed using thematic coding in NVivo and then mapped against the proposed graduate capabilities and thresholds for the revised BHSc. Lecturers validated these data using co-constructed matrices to explore coverage of these thesholds across the programme. At the end of 2014, teaching staff involved in the curriculum project (n=14) completed an evaluation analysing their perception of the effects of applying threshold concepts to their own development, and to their BHSc programme knowledge development. Outcomes: Evaluation results indicate that staff now report a greater common sense of purpose, increased collegiality and a more clarified overarching vision for the BHSc programme (which encompasses at least six distinct pathways of learning within the health sciences). By applying the frame of threshold concepts to the programme curriculum, many staff reported surprise that ‘taken for granted’ competencies such as academic, information and professional literacies were not actually being systematically built upon across the three years of the BHSc. This has been the springboard to a programme-wide redevelopment of the BHSc core courses assisted by external health sector representatives. Additionally, two new complementary ‘capstone’ courses have been planned for stage three of the programme which will more purposefully address real-world, essential graduate capabilities. How the conference sub-themes are addressed (200 words): This poster focuses centrally on conference theme one by exploring how threshold concepts can assist the process of establishing what capabilities are required of (BHSc) graduates and how we can ensure these are responsive to (health) sector needs. It highlights examples from practice in the Bachelor of Health Sciences programme. We first show how an overarching programme purpose was reframed in conjunction with external sector input by utilising Meyer & Land’s notion of threshold concepts. Next we illustrate examples of effective tools and processes (co-constructed matrices) that were applied by academic staff to shed light on gaps and overlaps in existing core course content and assessment tasks. Related to this we address questions from conference theme three concerned with how we can assess, embed and evaluate these graduate capabilities once we have mapped them across our courses. Examples also illustrate the processes utilised in designing stage three ‘capstone’ courses to embed and assess these graduate capabilities.

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  • Moving From Hard Copy to Online Marking Made Easy

    Li, C; Sheridan, Donald (2015-06)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Significant efficiencies can be made in marking classes with large enrolment using a workflow that involves existing or inexpensive technologies. This poster describes how innovative processes saved time, money, improved educational outcomes and quality assurance.

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  • Loop closure and kinase selectivity in lung cancer

    Yosaatmadja, Yuliana; Squire, Christopher (2016-07-17)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Somatic mutations in tyrosine kinase receptors that causes aberrant signalling have been implicated in the development of lung cancer. Two such receptors, EGFR and FGFR kinases are directly involved in many cases of aggressive metastasis and drug resistance. The FGFR kinase family consists of four highly conserved receptor proteins (FGFR1 – FGFR4). FGFR pathways are the main cause of resistance to chemotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer patients, and 22% of them show over-expression of FGFR1. There are a number of small molecules in phase III clinical trials that target not only FGFR but also other kinases. A wide range of EGFR mutations are linked to lung cancer development in never-smokers or former smokers. The two most common mutations are exon 19 deletions and the point mutation L858R in exon 21. Many patients harbouring L858R acquire a secondary T790M mutation after treatment with gefitinib/erlotinib resulting in drug resistance. In the past few years AstraZeneca have developed drugs that target specific proteins, eg; AZD4547 (FGFR1 selective) and AZD9291 (selectivity for T790M/L858R EGFR). In an effort to design our own novel and selective inhibitors, we solved the structures of AZD4547 and AZD9291 in complex with FGFR and EGFR respectively. In both cases, the phosphate binding loop (P-loop) of the proteins forms an unusual “bent” structure wrapped closely around these inhibitors. We speculate that the ability of these compounds to induce P-loop closure is an important part of their respective selectivity mechanisms.

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  • Population Pharmacokinetics of Ethanol in Moderate and Heavy Drinkers

    Jiang, Y; Holford, Nicholas; Murry, DJ; Brown, TL; Milavetz, G (2015-10-07)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Objectives: To investigate the effect of sex, age, and previous drinking history on ethanol pharmacokinetic parameters with the implementation of a rate dependent extraction model [1], which takes into account the change in hepatic first-pass extraction along with absorption rate and a body composition model that accounts for fat free mass and fat mass [2]. Methods: 108 moderate or heavy drinkers were dosed orally on 2 occasions to achieve a peak blood ethanol concentration of 0.65 g/L or 1.15 g/L using a randomized, crossover design. A total of 6025 breath measurements were obtained and converted into blood alcohol concentration by applying a blood: breath ratio of 2100:1. NONMEM 7.3.0 was used for data analysis. A semi-mechanistic rate dependent extraction model with zero-order input followed by first order absorption was utilized with V allometrically scaled by normal fat mass, Vmax allometrically scaled by total body weight and portal vein blood flow allometrically scaled by fat free mass. The effects of sex and age (21–34, 38–51, or 55–68 years of age) on V, Vmax, and Km; and the effect of drinking status (moderate or heavy drinkers) on Vmax and Km were explored. The covariate effect was considered to be statistically significant if the 95 % non-parametric bootstrap confidence interval of the fractional difference did not include 1. Results: The 95 % bootstrap confidence interval of fractional differences between groups in age, sex and ethanol consumption history all contain 1, indicating none of those covariates have significant effects on any ethanol disposition parameters. Conclusions: Age and sex were not regarded as significant predictors for ethanol disposition parameters after accounting for body size and composition. The results indicated a 19 % higher Vmax and 15 % lower Km for heavy drinkers compared with moderate drinkers, but the difference was not statistically significant.

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  • Condicoes de saude dos menores de 5 anos Pataxo, Minas Gerais, Brasil

    Santos, AP; Leite, MS; Conde, WL; Franco, MCP; Castro, TG (2016-10-29)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Introdução: O quadro de saúde dos povos indígenas no Brasil é complexo e dinâmico, está relacionado ao processo histórico de mudanças econômicas, sociais e ambientais (Santos & Coimbra Jr., 2003). Altas prevalências de déficit estatural (25,7%) tem acometido as crianças indígenas brasileiras e diarreia e infecção respiratória aguda sao apontadas como as maiores causas de internação hospitalar notificada (Horta et al., 2013; Leite et al., 2013; Coimbra et al., 2013). Objetivo: Dentre os menores de 5 anos Pataxo de Minas Gerais: 1) descrever características de nascimento, situação vacinal, acompanhamento do pre-natal e do crescimento e desenvolvimento, perfil de morbidades e acessos aos serviços de saúde; 2) verificar associacoes entre estado nutricional e condicoes de saude observadas. Metodologia: Estudo epidemiológico de base populacional, natureza transversal, com dados coletados em 2011 entre os Pataxó de Minas Gerais. Foram avaliadas 34 crianças (< 5 anos) residentes em 5 aldeias do povo Pataxó, localizadas nos município de Carmésia, Itapecerica e Açucena. A avaliação da situação de saúde utilizou questionário estruturado baseado no Primeiro Inquérito Nacional de Saúde e Nutrição dos Povos Indígenas (Cardoso et al., 2009). A aferição das medidas antropométricas (peso, estatura/comprimento e circunferência da cintura) foi realizada de acordo com as recomendações da Organização Mundial da Saúde. O presente estudo foi aprovado pelo comitê de ética da Universidade Federal de São Paulo pela Comissão Nacional de Ética em Pesquisa. Foram calculadas freqüências de variáveis categóricas e médias (desvios-padrão) e medianas das variáveis contínuas. Para a identificação de diferenças entre as médias utilizou o teste t de Student, enquanto proporções foram comparadas pelo teste do qui-quadrado de Pearson, adotando-se P< 0,05. Utilizou-se o programa SPSS (17.0) para analise dos dados. Resultados: Entre os menores de 5 anos, 55,9% eram do sexo feminino e 44,1% tinham idade inferior a 24 meses. A maioria das crianças nasceu no hospital, e 82,4% das maes tiveram 6 ou mais consultas de pre-natal. Mais de 80% das mesmas estavam com o esquema vacinal em dia a época da pesquisa e havia tomado a megadose de vitamina A. Apenas 8,8% das crianças tinham o registro do acompanhamento do crescimento no último mês anterior a pesquisa. A prevalência de hospitalização nos últimos 12 meses foi de 23,5%, mas nenhuma internação foi devida a infecções respiratórias e apenas uma criança foi internada com diarreia. Ocorrência de diarreia na última semana foi relatada para 17,6% das crianças e tosse para 35,3%. Devido ao fato dos déficits estaturais e ponderais serem inexistentes nesta população e o excesso de peso ter acometido somente uma das crianças, não foi possível verificar a distribuição dos distúrbios nutricionais de acordo com as variáveis independentes, de forma a verificar-se possíveis associações. Conclusões: Comparado com a populacao de criancas indigenas brasileiras, alguns indicadores de saude entre os Pataxo tiveram melhor desempenho, como a baixa prevalência de internação hospitalar reportada para diarreia e IRAs, a alta cobertura vacinal e o percentual de gestantes que tiverm 6 ou mais consultas pre-natal. No entanto, melhorias na periodicidade de acompanhamento do crescimento e desenvolvimento sao necessarias.

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  • Similar estimates of contrast sensitivity and acuity from psychophysics and automated analysis of optokinetic nystagmus

    Dakin, Steven; Turnbull, Philip (2016-05-14)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Although the contrast sensitivity function (CSF) is a particularly useful way of characterising functional vision, its psychophysical measurement relies on observers being able to make reliable perceptual reports. This can be challenging e.g. when testing children. Here we describe a system for measuring the CSF without observer-report using an automated analysis of optokinetic nystagmus (OKN), an oscillatory eye movement made in response to moving stimuli (here, spatial-frequency - SF - band-pass noise). We show that predicting perceived direction using the proportion of eye movements that are consistent with OKN in the stimulus direction allows us to make an unbiased estimate of contrast sensitivity across SF. We next compare CSFs of 25 observers derived using either OKN or perceptual report. Both approaches yield near-identical CSFs that capture subtle inter-observer variations in acuity (R=0.80, p< 0.0001) and contrast sensitivity (R=0.80, p< 0.0001) amongst observers with ostensibly normal vision. A trial-by-trial analysis reveals that, even when observers' perceptual report is at chance, there is a very high correlation between our OKN-derived measure and observers' perceptual report. This indicates that OKN and self-report are likely tapping into a common neural mechanism providing further support for the proposal that OKN is a valid alternative to the current gold standard measures of CSF based on perceptual report. We discuss how our approach can be paired with an efficient psychophysical method to derive rapid automated measures of the CSF and other measures of functional vision.

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  • Kai Time in ECE Survey

    Gerritsen, Sarah; Morton, Susan; Wall, C (2014-06-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Kai Time in ECE is a one-off online survey collecting information about nutrition and physical activity practices and policies for 3-4 year olds in licensed Early Childhood Education (ECE) services in Auckland, Counties Manukau and Waikato. The survey results will be used in PhD research on the influence of childcare on preschool dietary patterns and body size.

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  • Estado nutricional de los indígenas Pataxó de 5 aldeas de Minas Gerais, Brasil

    Castro, TG; Oliveira, SNLG; Mazzetti, CMS; Conde, WL; Leite, MS; Pimenta, AM (2012-11-13)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Introducción: En las últimas décadas los estudios brasileños sobre el estado nutricional no incluyeron la población indígena como un segmento de análisis, generando brechas de informaciones para el direccionamiento de políticas de alimentación y nutrición para el grupo. Objetivo: Evaluar el estado nutricional de los indígenas Pataxó de 5 aldeas de Minas Gerais. Metodología: Estudio transversal que evaluó 257 indígenas (87,4% del total) en 2011. El peso y la altura fueran evaluados conforme las orientaciones de la OMS. La circunferencia de la cintura (CC) fue tomada en el punto medio entre la cresta ilíaca y la última costilla. Las clasificaciones nutricionales fueron hechas a partir de los índices altura para edad (A/E), índice de masa corporal para edad (IMC/E), índice de masa corporal (IMC) y CC, utilizando las referencias de la OMS y de Lipschitz (para ancianos). Resultados: Fueron evaluados 70 niños (27,3%), 59 adolescentes (23,0%), 116 adultos (45,0%) y 12 ancianos (4,7 %). Ninguno de los niños presentó déficit para A/E, 1,4% presentaron bajo IMC/E y 2,9% peso elevado para IMC/E. Fue observado déficit de altura en 3,4% de los adolescentes y peso excesivo (IMC/E) en 8,5%. Altas prevalencias de sobrepeso/obesidad y valores elevados de CC fueron apuntados para adultos (56,0% y 56,8 %, respectivamente) y ancianos (25,0% y 75%, respectivamente). Conclusión: Se destacan el exceso de peso en la población de forma ascendente desde la niñez y la baja frecuencia de déficits nutricionales entre niños y adolescentes. Financiación: Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de Minas Gerais.

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  • Reverse Mentoring: Benefits and Barriers

    Ross, M; Dunham, Annette (2015)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background: Current research suggests that the modern workforce is comprised of a substantial proportion of ageing employees, in addition to an influx of young, first-time workers. This diverse and multigenerational workforce provides organisations an interesting challenge, in retaining engaged and productive employees, and ensuring relevant training and development. One specific management practice is reverse mentoring. Reverse mentoring is a unique form of mentoring, whereby the traditional roles of mentor and mentee are reversed. It involves a junior employee (in age/status) mentoring a senior employee. The junior employee is able to share their recent generational learnings and perspective with a senior organisational member, who gains insight into recent trends and technologies. Whilst there appear to be many benefits from this relationship, including increased communication and understanding; leadership development; and upskilling in relevant trends, there may also be some barriers to the success of the relationship. Barriers may include a resistance to the shift in power hierarchy and challenges with changing the traditional learning pedagogy of older teacher and younger learner. Aim: Reverse mentoring is a reasonably modern concept, and as such, empirical research on this practice is relatively new. This research aims to explore any benefits and barriers experienced in a reverse mentoring relationship. Method: Participants in this study will be recruited from a Melbourne hospital, who currently run a formal reverse mentoring relationship program. Approximately 16 individuals (8 mentors and 8 mentees), will be invited to participate. The proposed study uses a qualitative method of data collection, through semi-structured interviews. Interviews will be recorded, and responses will be transcribed, with thematic analysis used to identify common themes. Thematic analysis allows the common themes and experiences of mentors and mentees, to tell an overall story of the data. Conclusion: The proposed study’s findings contribute to a currently small base of research on reverse mentoring. It is hoped that the research will help (i) inform future quantitative research on reverse mentoring and (ii) inform organisational strategies that will help employees engage in reverse mentoring relationships in ways that effectively support their training and development.

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  • CO2 Fluxes and Concentrations in a Residential Area in the Southern Hemisphere

    Weissert, Lena; Salmond, Jennifer; Turnbull, JC; Schwendenmann, Luitgard (2014-12-15)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    While cities are generally major sources of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, recent research has shown that parts of urban areas may also act as CO2 sinks due to CO2 uptake by vegetation. However, currently available results are related to a large degree of uncertainty due to the limitations of the applied methods and the limited number of studies available from urban areas, particularly from the southern hemisphere. In this study, we explore the potential of eddy covariance and tracer measurements (13C and 14C isotopes of CO2) to quantify and partition CO2 fluxes and concentrations in a residential urban area in Auckland, New Zealand. Based on preliminary results from autumn and winter (March to July 2014) the residential area is a small source of CO2 (0.11 mol CO2 m-2 day-1). CO2 fluxes and concentrations follow a distinct diurnal cycle with a morning peak between 7:00 and 9:00 (max: 0.25 mol CO2 m-2 day-1/412 ppm) and midday low with negative CO2 fluxes (min: -0.17 mol CO2 m-2 day-1/392 ppm) between 10:00 and 15:00 local time, likely due to photosynthetic CO2 uptake by local vegetation. Soil CO2 efflux may explain that CO2 concentrations increase and remain high (401 ppm) throughout the night. Mean diurnal winter delta13C values are in anti-phase with CO2 concentrations and vary between -9.0 - -9.70/00. The depletion of delta13C compared to clean atmospheric air (-8.20/00) is likely a result of local CO2 sources dominated by gasoline combustion (appr. 60%) during daytime. A sector analysis (based on prevailing wind) of CO2 fluxes and concentrations indicates lower CO2 fluxes and concentrations from the vegetation-dominated sector, further demonstrating the influence of vegetation on local CO2 concentrations. These results provide an insight into the temporal and spatial variability CO2 fluxes/concentrations and potential CO2 sinks and sources from a city in the southern hemisphere and add valuable information to the global database of urban CO2 fluxes.

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  • Development of an organisational memory scale

    Dunham, Annette (2007-12-06)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    In many countries, people are retiring earlier than ever before and the retirement of the baby boom generation over the next two decades further intensifies the impact of this trend. Accompanying this development, are fears about the potential loss of organisational knowledge or memory which may equate to the loss of the organisation’s competitive advantage. Organisations, while recognizing that older workers often possess valuable “organisational memory” seem to also assume these same workers will readily divest themselves of their knowledge. Encouraging experienced workers to act as a mentor to younger or less experienced workers, is often mentioned in the management and related literature as a way of capturing and retaining valuable organisational knowledge. However, employees (including older workers) in the possession of considerable organisational memory, may, or may not be willing to divulge their knowledge to others, for a number of reasons. This poster presents initial results from the first of a series of studies designed to examine the relationship between organisational memory in the individual and propensity to mentor. It outlines the development and exploratory factor analysis of an “Organisational Memory” scale that taps the individual’s own resources in terms of organisational knowledge and expertise. Subsequent studies in the proposed research aim to help organisations more effectively target potential mentors for the purposes of retaining organisational knowledge, while also identifying the relevant costs and benefits of mentoring perceived by those individuals. By doing so it is hoped organisations will have a clearer understanding of how they can minimize costs while emphasising the benefits of such a relationship for the potential mentor. In contrast to the “development outcomes” focus of much of the mentoring literature, these studies give attention to the “knowledge sharing role of mentoring, while also touching on developmental outcomes, in this case, for the mentor

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  • Gorgeous Gallery: residential aged care in New Zealand, in pictures

    Broad, Joanna (2015)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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