231 results for Conference poster

  • Moving From Hard Copy to Online Marking Made Easy

    Li, C; Sheridan, Donald (2015-06)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Significant efficiencies can be made in marking classes with large enrolment using a workflow that involves existing or inexpensive technologies. This poster describes how innovative processes saved time, money, improved educational outcomes and quality assurance.

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  • Role of Antioxidants and Polyphenols in the Stability of Sauvignon Blanc Aromas

    Herbst, M; Kilmartin, PA; Nicolau, L (2006-02)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Impact of grape harvesting on varietal thiols in Sauvignon blanc wines

    Allen, T; Herbst-Johnstone, Mandy; Girault, M; Butler, P; Logan, G; Jouanneau, S; Nicolau, L; Kilmartin, PA (2012-02-03)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Resources and strategies used in New Zealand community pharmacies to identify and assist patients with low literacy: An opportunity to improve health outcomes.

    Aspden, Trudi; Sheridan, JL; McKie, J (2011)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background: Patients with lower literacy generally have less knowledge of health services, poorer health outcomes[1] and are more likely to have difficulty understanding prescription medication warning labels[2]. Objectives: To determine how pharmacy staff identify patients with limited literacy skills, the strategies used for identification, the resources available to help patients with low literacy and opportunities for upskilling. Methodology: A questionnaire was adapted from one developed by Praska et al 2005 [3]. A random sample of 120 New Zealand pharmacies were sent information about the study. Those pharmacists willing to participate were interviewed by telephone. Results: The response rate was 64% (n=77). Almost 38% of respondents reported that they used measures to identify patients with low literacy, most often during patient counselling. The most common strategy used to optimise the health care of patients with low literacy was spending extra time explaining the information. Written information in the form of Self Care cards and information leaflets was the resource most commonly available. However, 4% of respondents had no resources available in their pharmacy.

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  • Prolonged Exposure to S-Adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) Perturbs Adipocyte Biology

    Ngo, Sherry; Roberts, R; Castro, L; Bhoothpoor, C; Gluckman, P; Sheppard, A (2011-06)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The influence of the regional distribution of reduced lung elastic recoil on FEV1

    Hedges, KL; Hoffman, EA; Tawhai, MH (2010)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Rationale: A link has been observed in several studies between the regional distribution of emphysema and the resulting magnitude of reduction in FEV1. The aim of this study is to examine how the loss of elastic recoil associated with emphysema that develops in localized regions of the lung results in the observed trends in FEV1 reduction.

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  • Educating for disaster: Determining the core elements of a disaster curriculum for social work in New Zealand

    Adamson, Carole (2012)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    In 2010 and 2011, Aotearoa New Zealand was hit by a number of major disasters involving loss of human life and severe disruption to social, ecological and economic wellbeing. The Pike River mine explosions were closely followed by a sequence of major earthquakes in Christchurch, seismic events that have permanently altered the lives of thousands of people in our third largest city, the closure of the central business district and the effective abandonment of whole residential areas. In early October 2011, the ship, Rena, grounded on a reef off the port of Tauranga and threatened a major oil spill throughout the Bay of Plenty, where local communities with spiritual and cultural connections to the land depend on sea food as well as thrive on tourism. The Council for Social Work Education Aotearoa New Zealand (CSWEANZ), representing all the Schools of Social Work in New Zealand, held a ‘Disaster Curriculum’ day in November 2011, at which social workers and Civil Defence leaders involved in the Christchurch earthquakes, the Rena Disaster, Fiji floods and the Boxing Day tsunami presented their narrative experience of disaster response and recovery. Workshops discussed and identified core elements that participants considered vital to a social work curriculum that would enable social work graduates in a range of community and cultural settings to respond in safe, creative and informed ways. We present our core ideas for a social work disaster curriculum and consider a wide range of educational content based on existing knowledge bases and new content within a disaster framework.

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  • Preclinical characterization of PWT33597, a dual inhibitor of PI3-kinase alpha and mTOR.

    Matthews, DJ; O’Farrell, M; James, J; Giddens, Anna; Rewcastle, Gordon; Denny, William (2011-04-05)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    4485: Phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) is an important mediator of tumor cell growth, survival and proliferation. In particular, PI3K alpha is important for signaling downstream of receptor tyrosine kinases and is also frequently amplified or mutationally activated in tumors, suggesting that selective inhibitors of this isoform may have therapeutic utility in the treatment of cancer. Downstream of PI3K, the mTOR kinase also plays a critical role in cellular growth and metabolism, and inhibitors of mTOR have demonstrated clinical benefit in several tumor types. We report here the discovery and characterization of PWT33597, a dual inhibitor of PI3K alpha and mTOR. PWT33597 inhibits PI3K alpha and mTOR in biochemical assays with IC50 values of 19 and 14 nM respectively, and is approximately 10-fold selective with respect to PI3K gamma and PI3K delta. Profiling of PWT33597 against 442 protein kinases (Ambit Kinomescan) revealed little or no cross-reactivity with either serine/threonine or tyrosine kinases, and there was little cross-reactivity with an additional panel of 64 pharmacologically relevant targets. In NCI-H460 and HCT116 tumor cells with mutationally activated PI3K alpha, PWT33597 inhibits phosphorylation of PI3K and mTOR pathway proteins with cellular IC50 values similar to its biochemical IC50 values. PWT33597 has good pharmacokinetic properties in multiple preclinical species, is not extensively metabolized in vivo and shows little potential for interaction with cytochrome P450 enzymes. Following a single oral dose in vivo, PWT33597 shows durable inhibition of PI3K and mTOR pathway signaling in xenograft tumors. High compound distribution into tumors and potent anti-tumor activity has been observed in multiple tumor xenograft models with activated PI3K/mTOR pathways. Also, administration of PWT33597 in mice is associated with transient increases in plasma insulin, consistent with an effect on PI3K/AKT signaling. A robust PK/PD relationship has been defined, which will guide interpretation of the planned phase I clinical study. IND-enabling studies with PWT33597 are currently in progress.

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  • Using Sampling to Dynamically Reconfigure Problem-Solvers

    Franco, S; Barley, Michael (2008-07-13)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The time it takes a program to solve a particular problem depends heavily upon the choice of problem solving method, the data representation, heuristics etc. The specific choices can have a dramatic impact on performance. This research aims to produce a formula based on these design decisions and problem characteristics which predicts how long the problem will run until a solution is found. As means to this end we are working on a prototype problem solving method which dynamically adapts its search configuration in order to speed up finding a solution.

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  • PUKUmahi!: Kia whai te huarahi tika. NETwork! Roadmap for safe travel: Ensuring health benefits flow on to Māori

    Henare, Kimiora; Parker, K; Print, Cristin; Findlay, Michael; Lawrence, Benjamin (2015-11-02)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Neuroendocrine tumours (NET) are complex and variable, making it very difficult for clinicians to determine the best course of treatment. The NETwork project seeks to better understand the epidemiological impact of NETs in New Zealand, and to better characterise the disease to help inform oncologists how to treat it. The estimated incidence rate of patients with NETs in New Zealand is approximately 200 patients per year, however the impact among Māori is not yet known. Māori are disproportionately burdened by cancers of the lungs, stomach, and pancreas, so it is tempting to speculate that NET incidence among Māori could also be high. It is essential that Māori are involved in the study in order to get an accurate indication of the impact of this cancer in New Zealand, what genes are driving the cancers, and how each can be treated. The multi-faceted NETwork project combines epidemiological analysis and deep genome sequencing of retrospective and prospective NET tissues. Under the guidelines set out in Te Ara Tika, the design of this research project is mainstream, but is likely to involve Māori participants and have direct relevance to Māori. Despite being neither Māori-centred nor Kaupapa Māori in our approach, the NETwork team are dedicated to honouring the Treaty of Waitangi principles of partnership, participation, and protection. Mindful of the past transgressions involving the use of tissues and genetic information obtained from indigenous populations here in New Zealand and overseas, the NETwork group are keen not to repeat these errors themselves, nor facilitate the opportunity for others to do so. Following ongoing consultation with Te Mata Ira, Maui Hudson, Dr Helen Wihongi, and Associate Professor Papaarangi Reid, we have established a ‘roadmap for safe travel’ to guide all aspects of the multi-faceted project. The framework has three key principles (kawa) underpinning its Governance structure, and three core cultural protocols (tikanga) to be incorporated into the implementation strategies. Adhering to these kawa and tikanga should facilitate the establishment and maintenance of relationships with key stakeholders; a vital aspect to the project. The roadmap for safe travel is still in its early stages of development, and consultation is ongoing. Nevertheless, the NETwork team have a strong platform from which to further develop their project. Although the presented framework is specific to the NETwork project, it could easily be adjusted and utilised for other clinical and biomedical projects.

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  • The role of conspicuity in bicycle crashes involving a motor vehicle

    Tin Tin, Sandar; Woodward, Alistair; Ameratunga, Shanthi (2014-10-30)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • What is known about the experience of CPAP for OSA from the users’ perspective? A systematic integrative literature review

    Ward, Kim; Gott, M (2013-10-29)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Introduction: The estimated economic, social and personal cost of untreated obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is high. Night time continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is a recommended, cost effective and popular treatment. The predicted global increase in obesity will lead to increasing prevalence of OSA. Exploring management of CPAP from the user perspective is crucial to successful administration of this therapy. The objective was synthesis of the international evidence base regarding users’ experience of night time continuous positive airway pressure therapy for obstructive sleep apnoea. Materials and methods: A systematic integrative literature review was conducted and quality assessment criteria applied. Results: From 538 identified papers, 22 met inclusion criteria. Thematic analysis identified four themes: (1) evidence regarding experience of CPAP and issues of research design; (2) CPAP influenced by users’ views and beliefs; (3) CPAP investigated using a language of difficulty; and (4) spouse and family impact on CPAP use. Overall, research relating to user experience of CPAP is limited. Understanding is incomplete because of problems of study design, for example the use of pre-determined checklists and survey questions. The problem oriented terminology adopted by most studies is also likely to set up the expectation that users will encounter difficulties with CPAP. There is evidence that personality and attitude impact expectations about CPAP prior to and during use, whilst engagement of spouse, family and colleagues also influence experience. Conclusion: This comprehensive integrative review identified limited evidence about experiencing CPAP from the users’ perspective. Current research is constrained by researchers’ concern with non-compliance. Typically experiences of CPAP are not defined by the user, but from an ‘expert’ healthcare perspective, using language that defines CPAP as problematic. Family and social support is a significant, but underexplored, element of experiencing CPAP and warrants further investigation. Research that more comprehensively involves CPAP users is required to determine how patients manage this therapy successfully.

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  • Pharmacy students: Personality Types, Professionalism and Decision Making

    Jensen, Maree; Ram, Sanyogita; Dhana, A; Ali, R; Goh, S; Sherif, B; Kwon, S; Elsedfy, Y; Russell, Bruce (2014-06-02)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Facebook© use has become increasingly popular for pharmacy students. Recent debate about the ethical and professional principles pharmacy students possess when social networking online prompted this study. We aimed to identify links between personality types within the University of Auckland (UoA) pharmacy cohort, their activity on Facebook©, and their professional decision making skills.

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  • What influences the association between previous and future crashes among cyclists.

    Tin Tin, Sandar; Woodward, Alistair; Ameratunga, Shanthi (2014-10-09)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Comparison and refinement of hip joint centre prediction methods on a large contemporary population

    Zhang, Ju; Hislop-Jambrich, J; Besier, T (2014)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The location of the hip joint centre (HJC) is critical for accurate lower limb kinematics. A number of methods allow the HJC to be predicted from the locations of bony pelvic landmarks. However, widely used predictions methods are often developed on small populations, or have inappropriate parameters when considering different populations. We compare the accuracy of prediction methods by Tylkowski[1], Bell[2], and Seidel[3], and update their parameters using a large urban population. 3-D models of the pelvis were automatically segmented from 159 (86 male, 73 female) post-mortem CT scans collected at the Victorian Insitute of Forensic Medicine. The dataset reflects a contemporary western urban adult population from the state of Victoria, Australia. Bony landmarks (ASIS, PSIS, symphysis pubis) were defined on an atlas model and propagated to correspondent positions on each subject-specific model. The three published methods above were used to predict HJC locations first using their published parameters, then using parameters fitted to the current dataset. Ground truth HJC locations were calculated as the centre of a sphere fitted to the acetabular regions of each model. Using published parameters, mean errors in millimetres for the Tylkowski, Bell, and Seidel methods were, respectively, 23 (4.9), 26 (4.1), and 18 (3.9). After fitting parameters to the current dataset, corresponding mean errors were 13 (5.5), 7.3(4.0), and 5.7 (3.3). Published parameter errors were similar to published errors for the Tylkowski and Bell methods, and more than twice that published for the Seidel method. After fitting parameters, errors for all methods were significantly lower than those previously published. These results highlight the need to validate and recalibrate joint centre prediction methods on large and population-specific datasets.

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  • The STn-SNc hyperdirect pathway modulates dopaminergic neuron activity by inhibiting GABAergic inputs from the SNr via endocannabinoids

    Freestone, Peter; Wu, XH; de Guzman, G; Lipski, Janusz (2014-07-05)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The hyperdirect pathway of the basal ganglia circuitry terminates with a glutamatergic projection from the Subthalamic Nucleus (STN) to the Substantia Nigra pars compacta (SNc). We recently showed that glutamate released in the SNc drives endocannabinoid production in dopaminergic neurons, which in turn inhibits GABAergic transmission in that region. The present study investigated the potential role of STN glutamatergic projections of the hyperdirect pathway in this novel endocannabinoid modulatory mechanism. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were made from SNc dopaminergic neurons in horizontal brain slices (rat) containing STN, SNc and Substantia Nigra pars reticulata (SNr) regions. Either electrical (bi-polar electrode) or pharmacological (local carbachol application) stimulation of the STN was performed to evoke selective glutamate release from terminals in the SNc. GABAergic inputs to the SNc from the SNr were electrically stimulated to evoke inhibitory post-synaptic currents (eIPSCs). Single-pulse electrical stimulation of the STN caused transient (< 1 sec) attenuation of GABAergic eIPSCs amplitudes recorded from dopaminergic neurons (to 73% of control). The eIPSC attenuation was prevented by block of either cannabinoid CB1 receptors with rimonabant (3 µM) or metabotropic glutamate mGluR1 receptors with CPCCOEt (100 µM). Pharmacological activation of STN neurons by rapid local perfusion of muscarinic agonist carbachol (100 µM, 10 s) caused a similar attenuation of eIPSC amplitude. These findings show that glutamate release from STN terminals in the SNc modulates GABAergic transmission through endocannabinoid signalling – a previously undescribed function of the hyperdirect pathway.

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  • Paternal depression during pregnancy and after childbirth: evidence from Growing Up in New Zealand

    Underwood, Lisa; Atatoa Carr, P; Berry, S; Grant, Cameron; Peterson, Elizabeth; Waldie, Karen; Morton, Susan (2016-07-06)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background: There is little evidence on depression among men whose partners are pregnant or have recently given birth. Methods: An ethnically and socioeconomically diverse sample of 3528 men living in New Zealand completed interviews during their partner's pregnancy and nine months after the birth of their child. Depression symptoms were measured using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) and the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). Rates of depression (defined as EPDS>12 and PHQ-9>9) and associations with a range of paternal and maternal characteristics were explored using logistic regression. Results: Antenatal paternal depression, which affected 2.3% of fathers, was associated with paternal perceived stress (OR=1.4, 95%CI 1.3 to 1.5) and fair to poor paternal health (OR=2, 95%CI 1.1 to 3.5) during their partner's pregnancy. Postnatal paternal depression affected 4.3% of fathers and was associated with paternal perceived stress in pregnancy (OR=1.12, 95%CI 1.1 to 1.2), relationship status at nine months after childbirth (OR=5.6, 95%CI 2 to 15.7), fair to poor paternal health at nine months (OR=3.3, 95%CI 2 to 5.1), employment status at nine months (OR=1.8, 95%CI 1.1 to 3.1) and a past history of depression (OR=2.8, 95%CI 1.7 to 4.7). Conclusions: Expectant fathers are at risk of depression if they feel stressed or are in poor health. In this study, rates of depression were higher during the postpartum period and were associated with adverse social and relationship factors. Identifying who is most at-risk of paternal depression and when will help inform interventions to help men and their families.

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  • Household Characteristics of Children Under Two Years Admitted with Lower Respiratory Infection in South Auckland

    Vogel, A; Trenholme, A; Lennon, Diana; McBride, C; Stewart, Joanna; Best, Emma; Mason, H; Siatu'u, Teuila (2011-04-02)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Investigation into the racemic X-ray structure of the antimicrobial protein snakin-1

    Yeung, Ho; Yosaatmadja, Yuliana; Squire, Christopher; Harris, Paul; Baker, Edward; Brimble, Margaret (2015-10-22)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Is keratoconus a case of matrix remodelling gone crazy?

    Brookes, Nigel; Loh, IP; Clover, GM; Poole, CA; Sherwin, Trevor (2002)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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