231 results for Conference poster

  • Applying threshold concepts to unlock the ‘hidden’ core of a multifaceted health sciences curriculum

    Petersen, L; Egan, John; Barrow, Mark (2015-07-07)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Title: Applying threshold concepts to unlock the ‘hidden’ core of a multifaceted health sciences curriculum Background/context: In 2014, a curriculum implementation plan was developed to comprehensively map the existing Bachelor of Health Sciences (BHSc) curriculum so as to inform a cohesive workforce-related vision for the future. However, prior to mapping the curriculum, staff first needed to agree upon what the future-focused set of graduate capabilities across their diverse programme should be. To do so, we applied Meyer and Land’s (2003) notion of threshold concepts to enable us to unpack and clarify what felt like a complex, and at times hidden, core curriculum. Research/evaluation method: The existing BHSc programme was analysed using the frame of threshold concepts through a series of staff and student focus group sessions. This led to a refining of six central threshold concepts for the degree. This in turn informed the revision of a set of programme-wide graduate capabilities. Pre-review course outlines (n=24) and assessments (n=104) were analysed using thematic coding in NVivo and then mapped against the proposed graduate capabilities and thresholds for the revised BHSc. Lecturers validated these data using co-constructed matrices to explore coverage of these thesholds across the programme. At the end of 2014, teaching staff involved in the curriculum project (n=14) completed an evaluation analysing their perception of the effects of applying threshold concepts to their own development, and to their BHSc programme knowledge development. Outcomes: Evaluation results indicate that staff now report a greater common sense of purpose, increased collegiality and a more clarified overarching vision for the BHSc programme (which encompasses at least six distinct pathways of learning within the health sciences). By applying the frame of threshold concepts to the programme curriculum, many staff reported surprise that ‘taken for granted’ competencies such as academic, information and professional literacies were not actually being systematically built upon across the three years of the BHSc. This has been the springboard to a programme-wide redevelopment of the BHSc core courses assisted by external health sector representatives. Additionally, two new complementary ‘capstone’ courses have been planned for stage three of the programme which will more purposefully address real-world, essential graduate capabilities. How the conference sub-themes are addressed (200 words): This poster focuses centrally on conference theme one by exploring how threshold concepts can assist the process of establishing what capabilities are required of (BHSc) graduates and how we can ensure these are responsive to (health) sector needs. It highlights examples from practice in the Bachelor of Health Sciences programme. We first show how an overarching programme purpose was reframed in conjunction with external sector input by utilising Meyer & Land’s notion of threshold concepts. Next we illustrate examples of effective tools and processes (co-constructed matrices) that were applied by academic staff to shed light on gaps and overlaps in existing core course content and assessment tasks. Related to this we address questions from conference theme three concerned with how we can assess, embed and evaluate these graduate capabilities once we have mapped them across our courses. Examples also illustrate the processes utilised in designing stage three ‘capstone’ courses to embed and assess these graduate capabilities.

    View record details
  • Protein-Based Identification of Epithelial Cell Types in Forensic Samples

    Simons, Joanne; Vintiner, SK (2007-09-04)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Although the value of DNA profiles found at a crime scene is indisputable, there is increasing importance in identifying the cellular source of the DNA as well as the identity of the person to whom the profile belongs. Knowledge regarding the cellular source from which the DNA profile originates increases the evidential value of the sample. Our research involves investigation of protein candidates in order to find an epithelial cell type-specific protein that will enable differentiation of vaginal, buccal and skin cells in forensic samples. We have used several methods including histochemical stains, western analysis and immunohistochemistry to investigate candidate proteins known to be present in various types of epithelial cells. Our most current results from these studies will be presented here.

    View record details
  • Investigations At Hi-SEAS into Team Function and Performance on Long Duration Exploration Missions

    Binsted, KA; Basner, M; Bedwell, W; Caldwell, Bryan; Chang, D; Hunter, J; Kozlowski, S; Nasrini, J; Roma, P; Santoro, J; Seibert, M; Shiro, B; Wu, P (2016-02-09)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    HI-SEAS HI-SEAS (Hawaii Space Exploration Analog and Simulation, www.hi-seas.org) is a habitat on an isolated Mars-like site on the Mauna Loa side of the saddle area on the Big Island of Hawaii at approximately 8200 feet above sea level. HI-SEAS is unique, in addition to its setting in a distinctive analog environment, as: - we select the crew to meet our research needs (in contrast, at serendipitous analogs, such as Antarctic stations, crew selection criteria are not controlled by researchers); - the conditions (habitat, mission, communications, etc.) are explicitly designed to be similar to those of a planetary exploration mission; - the site is accessible year round, allowing longer-duration isolated and confined environment studies than at other locations; - the Mars-like environment offers the potential for analog tasks, such as geological field work by human explorers and/or robots. The ability to select crew members to meet research needs and isolate them in a managed simulation performing under specific mission profiles makes HI-SEAS ideal for detailed studies in space-flight crew dynamics, behaviors, roles and performance, especially for long-duration missions. MISSIONS TO DATE As of February 2016, there have been three missions completed at HI-SEAS, two of four months in length, and one of eight months. The fourth mission, which is twelve months long, is currently under way, and will end in August 2016. UPCOMING MISSIONS The next cycle of missions will see the research focus at HI-SEAS shift from crew cohesion and performance to crew composition. We expect the first of three eight-month missions to start in late 2016. CURRENT RESEARCH The current research projects being carried out at HI-SEAS focus on crew cohesion, function and performance. Preliminary results from each of these projects are being presented in detail by the co-authors separately at this meeting. This presentation will provide an overview of the research conducted to date, and the plans for the future. OPPORTUNISTIC RESEARCH In order to maximize research return, and to provide HI-SEAS crews with a realistic workload, we welcome proposals for opportunistic research to be carried out during HI-SEAS missions. Proposed projects must a) advance human space exploration by addressing NASA’s needs and requirements; b) require a long-duration analog for desired research outcomes; and c) not confound the primary research. If you are interested in submitting an opportunistic research proposal, please contact the first author.

    View record details
  • Characterisation of the Genetic Controls of Branching in Petunia

    Simons, Joanne; Templeton, KR; Plummer, K; Beveridge, CA; Snowden, KC (2005-10-12)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Branching is a fundamental process affecting plant form and is a source of much of the wide variety of plant architecture seen in nature. Our aim is to understand the function of genes involved in branching using petunia as a model system. This research involves the study of the decreased apical dominance (dad) mutants in petunia, which have increased basal branching compared with wild type. It also involves the investigation of genes known to affect branching in other plant species to discover their effects in petunia. One of these genes, MAX2, was identified from an increased branching mutant in Arabidopsis, and its effects in petunia are being investigated by misexpression of the petunia orthologue. Previous grafting experiments using the dad mutants in petunia have shown that a graft-transmissible signal is involved in causing the increased branching phenotype. Hormones are graft-transmissible chemicals and variation in their levels play important roles in the control of apical dominance, one of the most studied controls in lateral branching. Auxin and cytokinin levels in dad mutant and wild type plants were investigated, but the levels of these hormones were not consistent with them being the graft-transmissible signal modified by the DAD genes. In order to investigate the relationships between the DAD genes, the branching phenotypes of the single and double dad mutants were characterised and analysed. Grafting experiments to investigate the interactions between the DAD genes in controlling the branching signal were also undertaken. This work has revealed interactions between the DAD genes and provided evidence for the order of action of these genes.

    View record details
  • Investigation into the racemic X-ray structure of the antimicrobial protein snakin-1

    Yeung, Ho; Yosaatmadja, Yuliana; Squire, Christopher; Harris, Paul; Baker, Edward; Brimble, Margaret (2015-08-31)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Snakin-1 is a 63 residue antimicrobial protein originally isolated from potato (Solanum tuberosum).1 It is active against a number of bacterial and fungal phytopathogens such as Clavibacter michiganensis, Pseudomonas syringae and Fusarium solani. Snakin-1 is a member of the GASA (gibberellic acid stimulated in Arabidopsis)/snakin family and the mature protein consists of a GASA domain incorporating six intramolecular disulfide bonds.2 The amino acid sequences of these proteins do not correspond to any known structural motifs. GASA/snakin proteins are found in a variety of plant species and appear to be involved in a range of functions including cell elongation and cell division.2 Their expression profiles support these roles and are commonly linked to development.2 It has also been speculated that the 12 conserved cysteines in these proteins perform a role in redox regulation.2 We have recently completed the total chemical synthesis of native Snakin-1 and showed that its antimicrobial activity is comparable to that of the naturally occurring protein.3 In an attempt to understand how this small protein functions we have determined its threedimensional structure by X-ray crystallography using a quasi-racemic protein system.4 Phase information for structural determination was obtained by radiation-damage induced phasing.5 The structure of snakin-1 appears to be novel, different to known classes of cysteine-rich plant antimicrobial peptide. Its features include a large and distinctly electropositive loop that we speculate to be membrane targeting, and a two helix bundle which is a potential membrane-interacting feature able to disrupt the structural integrity of its target bacteria.

    View record details
  • Synthesis and mechanistic studies of PLA₂ inihibition by the marine alkaloid hyrtiosulawesine

    Liew, Lydia; Bourguet-Kondracki, M-L; Copp, Brent (2010-10-17)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The first isolation of hyrtiosulawesine (1) was from an Indonesian collection of the marine sponges Hyrtios erectus and H. reticulatus.1 The β-carboline alkaloid was subsequently re-isolated from a Red Sea collection of Hyrtios sp. and found to display anti-phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity with an IC50 value of 14 μM. Phospholipase A2 catalyses the hydrolysis of membrane phospholipids at the sn-2 position to generate arachidonic acids (AA).3,4 AA are precursors to a large family of compounds known as the eicosanoids associated with inflammatory reactions.4 PLA2 inhibition by hyrtiosulawesine would lead to a decrease in AA and proinflammatory eicosanoids, with anti-inflammatory effect.4 In an effort to understand the structural attributes of the natural product (1) that cause PLA2 inhibition, hyrtiosulawesine and a series of related model compounds (2, 3) will be synthesised and evaluated for biological activity. Biomimetic nucleophiles will be used to probe hyrtiosulawesine and related compounds in order to determine their reactivity and possible site of reaction. Bioactive members of the library of compounds will subsequently be subjected to reaction with bee venom phospholipase A2 to identify the presence of any covalent adducts. Further studies may be directed to discovering the nature and location of the covalent linkage within the enzyme active site. The latest results will be presented. References 1. Salmoun, M.; Devijver, C.; Daloze, D.; Braekman, J.-C.; Van Soest, R. W. M. J. Nat. Prod. 2002, 65, 1173-1176. 2. Sauleau, P.; Martin, M.-T.; Dau, M.-E. T. H.; Youssef, D. T. A.; Bourguet-Kondracki, M.-L. J. Nat. Prod. 2006, 69, 1676-1679. 3. Balsinde, J.; Balboa, M. A.; Insel, P. A.; Dennis, E. A. Annu. Rev. Pharmacol. Toxicol. 1999, 39, 175-189. 4. Parente, L. J. Rheumatol. 2001, 28, 2375-2382.

    View record details
  • Polyamine diamide orthidine F as a potent and selective antimalarial lead compound

    Liew, Lydia; Kaiser, M; Copp, B (2013)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    THE POLYAMINE DIAMIDE ORTHIDINE F AS A POTENT AND SELECTIVE ANTIMALARIAL LEAD COMPOUND Orthidine F (1) was isolated from an extract of the marine organism Aplidium orthium, found at Three Kings Islands, New Zealand.1 An initial screen of the natural product 1 against a panel of parasitic protozoa (Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, Trypanosoma cruzi, Leishmania donovani and Plasmodium falciparum K1 dual drug-resistant strain) identified selective inhibitory activity for T. brucei rhodesiense (IC50 78 μM) against T. cruzi, no detectable activity towards L. donovani and moderate activity against P. falciparum. Furthermore, the natural product was found to be non-toxic in the non-malignant L6 rat myoblast cell line, thus representing an attractive target as an antiparasitic drug. A preliminary structure-activity relationship (SAR) study identified analogues with a similar activity profile to the natural product. The analogues were found to exhibit moderate inhibitory activity against T. brucei rhodesiense (IC50 3.2–210 μM), more potent inhibitory activity against P. falciparum (IC50 0.0086–0.61 μM), and no significant activity against T. cruzi and L. donovani. The analogues also continued to display little or no cytotoxic effect in the L6 cell line, this combined with the potent IC50 values obtained for inhibition of P. falciparum afforded a series of analogues with impressive properties which warranted further studies. This led to a second series of analogues with the intention of improving its antimalarial activity. The analogues generated from this exercise exhibited potent in vitro activities (IC50 0.0086–0.61 μM) while retaining selectivity against P. falciparum. Three analogues were selected based on the in vitro data obtained and evaluated for in vivo activity in the Plasmodium berghei mouse model of malaria; which in this instance did not yield significant activity.

    View record details
  • fMRI Measures of the Dorsal Visual Cortex Correlates with Behavioral Performance and Cortical Thickness

    Poppe, Tanya; Leung, Myra; Tottman, Anna; Harding, Jane; Bloomfield, Francis; Alsweiler, Jane; Thompson, Benjamin (2015)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    View record details
  • Kai Time in ECE Survey

    Gerritsen, Sarah; Morton, Susan; Wall, C (2014-06-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Kai Time in ECE is a one-off online survey collecting information about nutrition and physical activity practices and policies for 3-4 year olds in licensed Early Childhood Education (ECE) services in Auckland, Counties Manukau and Waikato. The survey results will be used in PhD research on the influence of childcare on preschool dietary patterns and body size.

    View record details
  • The potential of urban forests to mitigate atmospheric CO2 concentrations

    Weissert, Lena; Salmond, Jennifer; Schwendenmann, Luitgard (2013)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The urban population in New Zealand is expected to increase significantly over the next years. Urban areas are generally large sources of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. However, attempts to quantify atmospheric CO2 concentrations and fluxes have suggested that densily vegetated urban areas may absorb sufficient quantities of anthropogenic CO2 to act as a local sink. Consequently, urban greening programs now form an important part of many urban climate change mitigation policies globally as well as in New Zealand. However, knowledge about the direct contribution of urban vegetation on atmospheric CO2 concentrations is still limited and measurements scarce. This paper examines the methods used to date to estimate / measure carbon pools and CO2 fluxes from urban vegetation and soils (collectively known as urban forests) and aggregates currently available results. Results from the northern hemisphere show that carbon pools in urban forests were comparable to 3 – 60% of the annually released fossil fuel emissions, while photosynthetic uptake accounted for 0.3 – 2.6% of the total estimated emissions in urban areas. Whilst vegetation did not offset CO2 emissions on an annual basis in these scenarios, vegetative CO2 uptake resulted in significantly lower atmospheric CO2 concentrations in summer. However, the currently available results are related to a large degree of uncertainty due to the limitations of the applied methods, the limited number of urban areas studied and the temporal / spatial resolution of the fieldwork. This paper demonstrates that in order to effectively quantify and encorporate carbon fluxes from urban areas into annual CO2 budgets, future research needs to use a combination of methodologies and be aware of the scales of their studies. Thus, before investing in urban greening programs the potential of urban vegetation as a climate change mitigation measure needs to be further investigated, particularly for cities in the southern hemisphere.

    View record details
  • Reverse Mentoring: Benefits and Barriers

    Ross, M; Dunham, Annette (2015)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background: Current research suggests that the modern workforce is comprised of a substantial proportion of ageing employees, in addition to an influx of young, first-time workers. This diverse and multigenerational workforce provides organisations an interesting challenge, in retaining engaged and productive employees, and ensuring relevant training and development. One specific management practice is reverse mentoring. Reverse mentoring is a unique form of mentoring, whereby the traditional roles of mentor and mentee are reversed. It involves a junior employee (in age/status) mentoring a senior employee. The junior employee is able to share their recent generational learnings and perspective with a senior organisational member, who gains insight into recent trends and technologies. Whilst there appear to be many benefits from this relationship, including increased communication and understanding; leadership development; and upskilling in relevant trends, there may also be some barriers to the success of the relationship. Barriers may include a resistance to the shift in power hierarchy and challenges with changing the traditional learning pedagogy of older teacher and younger learner. Aim: Reverse mentoring is a reasonably modern concept, and as such, empirical research on this practice is relatively new. This research aims to explore any benefits and barriers experienced in a reverse mentoring relationship. Method: Participants in this study will be recruited from a Melbourne hospital, who currently run a formal reverse mentoring relationship program. Approximately 16 individuals (8 mentors and 8 mentees), will be invited to participate. The proposed study uses a qualitative method of data collection, through semi-structured interviews. Interviews will be recorded, and responses will be transcribed, with thematic analysis used to identify common themes. Thematic analysis allows the common themes and experiences of mentors and mentees, to tell an overall story of the data. Conclusion: The proposed study’s findings contribute to a currently small base of research on reverse mentoring. It is hoped that the research will help (i) inform future quantitative research on reverse mentoring and (ii) inform organisational strategies that will help employees engage in reverse mentoring relationships in ways that effectively support their training and development.

    View record details