231 results for Conference poster

  • Space-Time Multi-Resolution Banded Graph-Cut for Fast Segmentation. (Conference Poster)

    Vaudrey, Tobi; Gruber, Daniel; Wedel, Andreas; Klappstein, Jens (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Conference Details: 30th Annual Symposium of the German Association for Pattern Recognition DAGM Munich, Germany, June 2008. http://www.dagm2008.org/ Applying real-time segmentation is a major issue when processing every frame of image sequences. In this paper, we propose a modi cation of the well known graph-cut algorithm to improve speed for discrete segmentation. Our algorithm yields real-time segmentation, using graph-cut, by performing a single cut on an image with regions of di erent resolutions, combining space-time pyramids and narrow bands. This is especially suitable for image sequences, as segment borders in one image are re ned in the next image. The fast computation time allows one to use information contained in every image frame of an input image stream at 20 Hz, on a standard PC. The algorithm is applied to traf- c scenes, using a monocular camera installed in a moving vehicle. Our results show the segmentation of moving objects with similar results to standard graph-cut, but with improved speed.

    View record details
  • Goal: Real-Time Segmentation via Graph Cut Goal: Real-Time Segmentation via Graph Cut

    Vaudrey, Tobi; Wedel, Andreas; Rabe, Clemens; Klappstein, Jens; Klette, Reinhard (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Conference Details: 2008 23rd International Conference Image and Vision Computing New Zealand. IVCNZ 08. Lincoln University, Christchurch, 26-28 November 2008. http://www.lvl.co.nz/ivcnz2008/ The detection of moving objects is a crucial part of driver assistance systems. This paper tackles this issue using computer vision. Two approaches are investigated, monocular and stereoscopic. The base principals and implementational issues are discussed and detailed, high- lighting areas of concern. In both cases, the detection is based on motion analysis of individually tracked image points (optical ow). The monoc- ular approach relies solely on the optical ow, where as the stereoscopic approach also takes stereo depth information into account. In both ap- proaches the motion analysis provides a motion metric which corresponds to the likelihood that the tracked point is moving. Based on this metric the points are segmented into objects by employing the globally op- timal graph cut algorithm. These approaches are then compared and contrasted using real-world vehicle image sequences.

    View record details
  • Doped Diamond-Like Carbon (DLC) coated surfaces to reduce fouling from milk

    Patel, Jaiminkumar; Bansal, B; Jones, MI; Hyland, M (2010-11-09)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    In the dairy industry, fouling of processing surfaces is a common and unresolved problem. Surface modification, for example through the application of a surface coating, can alter the surface properties of a material, and may be a potential way to reduce fouling. Typical dairy plant stainless steel surfaces were modified by the deposition of doped Diamond-Like Carbon (DLC) films with varying concentration of doped elements. These modified surfaces were studied for their fouling behavior with milk at both laboratory and pilot scale. None of the doped DLC modified surfaces investigated in the study presented benefits in fouling reduction as compared to unmodified surface.

    View record details
  • Three-Dimensional Structural Characterization of Tissue Engineered and Native Ovine Pulmonary Valves

    Eckert, Chad; Gerneke, Dane; LeGrice, IJ; Gottlieb, David; Mayer, JE; Sacks, MS (2009-04)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    OBJECTIVES: Efforts in tissue-engineered heart valves (TEHV) have shown increasingly equivalent mechanical/structural properties compared to native valves, though a literature gap exists regarding detailed structural information. This work was performed to provide such data of implanted TEHV, the native pulmonary valve (PV), and pre-implant scaffold to better understand developing TEHV. METHODS: Dynamically-cultured in vivo samples (“pre-implant”) and ovine TEHV PV in vitro samples (“explant”) were produced based on previous techniques; ovine PVs were excised. Samples were stained with picrosirius red and resinmounted. Using extended-volume scanning laser confocal microscopy (EV-SLCM), 1.5 x 1.5 x 0.4 mm full-thickness samples were imaged at 1 pixel/μm in 1 μm Z-direction steps. Custom software was used to process and visualize samples. Collagen, cell nuclei, and scaffold volume fractions were quantified; scaffold fiber trajectory and length were tracked using custom software. RESULTS: In a scaffold representative volume (90 μm thick), 104 fibers were tracked with a mean fiber length of 137.94 μm 55.4 μm (Fig.1). A comparison between pre-implant and explant samples showed collagen volume fraction increasing from 76.6% to 85.9%, with nuclei and scaffold decreasing from 2.8% to 0.5% and from 5.9% to 0.8%, respectively. With the native collagen volume fraction measured at 70%, pre-implant and explant samples showed an increase in collagen. CONCLUSIONS: This work captured important differences between in vivo/in vitro TEHV constituents; it is the first known work to utilize EV-SLCM on TEHV. A comparison to the native valve showed structural differences that could impact longterm functionality and improve design.

    View record details
  • Variations in Extemporaneous Ophthalmic Practices in New Zealand Hospitals

    Gargiulo, Derryn; Kairuz, Therese (2006-11-09)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    In New Zealand certain dosage forms are not readily available as a result of government policy on the funding of pharmaceuticals. Extemporaneous ophthalmic formulations are required for a variety of patients, and the challenge to demonstrate that such products are prepared in accordance with best practice. Extemporaneous compounding is considered an area of pharmaceutical activity that carries a high risk of error in terms of safety and quality. This can be increased by the number of aseptic manipulations.

    View record details
  • High throughput methods for the investigation of the human microbiome

    Lau, Kelvin; Berg, A; Ketley, J; Barer, M (2011-03-09)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Microorganisms can colonise many sites within the human host, including the skin, gastrointestinal tracts, oronasopharyngeal cavity and urogenital tract. Comprehensive studies of the human microbiome often need to encompass a large number of samples as a consequence of the variety of distinct sites that are colonised, and the significant variation in microbiota that can exist between individuals. For large sample sets, the cost of sequencing and the bioinformatics resources required to process sequence data can be prohibitive, and become limiting factors for the depth of the investigation. ....

    View record details
  • Design of a water soluble amethyrin macrocycle

    Albrett, Amelia; Brothers, Penelope; Aguilar, A; Lee, JT; Sessler, JL (2006-07)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    This JPP issue contains all abstracts accepted for presentation at the Fourth International Conference of Porphyrins and Phthalocyanines (ICPP-4) which was held in Rome, Italy, July 2-7, 2006 and coorganized by Drs Roberto Paolesse and Pietro Tagliatesta from the University of Rome “Tor Vergata”. The printed book of abstracts was given to all ICPP-4 attendees, being a necessary tool to follow the rich scientific program of the meeting, and should also prove useful to those readers of JPP who were not able to attend the biennial scientific meeting of the Society of Porphyrins and Phthalocyanines (SPP).

    View record details
  • Operational Decision Making for Aluminium Smelters

    Gao, Yashuang; Taylor, Mark; Chen, JJJ; Hautus, Michael (2008-11-26)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Many computer systems incorporating artificial intelligence have been introduced for use in industry to assist in making decisions and controlling processes. However, decision making in a complex industrial plant, such as an aluminium smelter, involves psychologically related factors such as intuitive reasonings, operator response characteristics, perception of risk, and implication of rewards. While a significant body of work does exist on decision science, research concerning human interaction with process control systems is still at the development stage. The work reported here aims to meet the needs of the process industry by incorporating human factors and decision making strategies into computer programs such as a supervisory control system for aluminium smelters. A case study on the control of the level of the liquid electrolyte was carried out to firstly facilitate an understanding of the variables, including human factors, on process control. It was found that the availability of crushed solidified electrolyte material had a significant impact on the level of the liquid electrolyte, while the implementation of a supervisory control system had a certain impact, management and leadership styles also had a significant influence.

    View record details
  • Context and relationship: defining resilience in health social workers

    Adamson, Carole; Beddoe, Elizabeth; Huggard, Peter (2011-11-05)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    A qualitative study of social workers in physical and mental health asked experienced social workers who self-defined as resilient to define the concept and to explore the elements of resiliency within their practice. Initial definition of resilience as a personal characteristic was developed into a strongly contextual and relational construct, the binding feature of which was self-awareness and the capacity to reflect. A strong feature of the social workers’ understanding of resilience was their focus on relationship with colleagues and the quality of professional social work practice with service users. Further reflexive and structural elements in their professional lives were identified, highlighting that resilience within health social workers is in dynamic relationship with the organisational context. A resilience framework derived from current literature and from the research is presented.

    View record details
  • Baby, Baby: Pregnant Again After Postnatal Depression

    Cowie, Susan (2008-09-10)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Depression following birth has wide ranging impacts on the woman, her new baby and her family. Studies indicate that treatment has been effective in shortening the duration of depression but does not prevent the increased risk of experiencing depression following another birth. This study explores in detail women’s and practitioners understandings of first time mother’s experiences of and recovery from depression and then focus on how the women prepare for and make sense of the experience of second time pregnancy and motherhood. It is hoped to develop strategies to reduce recurrence and impact of depression in women with young children. Results are presented of interviews with 25 women who had previously experienced post natal depression. Interviews were conducted 3-6 months before birth, focusing firstly on how the women make sense of their transition to first time motherhood and coping with/recovery from depression and secondly, on their expectations of second time birth and motherhood. The second interview, completed 3 months after birth, focused on their experience of the pregnancy, birth, and life with another child. Qualitative methodologies were employed. Of particular interest were the things that women described as helpful and unhelpful, their understanding of the help/treatment (e.g. Home help, CBT, support group, Arapax) they had gained and how this influenced their decisions and coping second time round. Preliminary analyses, particularly of time one data (collection complete), are reported and issues related to the study design and implementation are discussed.

    View record details
  • "But what about the theory?" Designing a social work curriculum around practice learning and reflection

    Adamson, Carole; Bellinger, A (2010-06-10)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Curriculum design in an academic context operates within a site of tension characterised by the need

    View record details