231 results for Conference poster

  • Radiofrequency ablation of osteoid osteoma - aiming for zero recurrence

    Doyle, Anthony; Graydon, A; French, JG; Hanlon, M (2016-04-30)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Over a 13 year period, a single radiologist (AJD) performed radiofrequency ablation (RFA)of osteoid osteoma in 32 patients. The lesions were located mostly in the lower extremities (femur N=15, tibia N=9) and spine (N=5). Lesion size varied from 4 to 18 mm, average 10 mm. Patient age ranged from 5 to 23 years, average 14 years. All but two had RFA as their primary treatment, with two treated after surgical excision had resulted in recurrence. CT guidance was used for all procedures, performed under general anaesthetic. A variety of different radiofrequency generators and probes were used. No complications occurred. None of the patients showed any signs of recurrence and none required further intervention. Although the followup period varied (and a few patients were lost to followup after a few weeks), most of the patients were followed for at least 12 months post procedure, with maximum followup seven years. We conclude that, with careful technique, the recurrence rate for RFA of osteoid osteoma can approach zero. Details of technique are discussed in the poster itself.

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  • Neonatal invasive pneumococcal disease in NewZealand in the era of conjugate pneumococcal vaccination 2009 - 2013

    Burton, C; Mount, V; Jackson, C; Heffernan, H; Best, Emma (2014-11-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Appropriate Antibiotics for Empyema at Starship Children’s Hospital

    Burton, C; Price, Neil; Best, Emma (2014-11-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Reducing the Risks of Long-Term Human Space Exploration by Simulating Missions in an Analog Environment on Mauna Loa

    Binsted, K; Hunter, JB; Caldwell, Bryan (2012-02)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Measuring the electrical impedance of mouse brain cortex

    Wilson, MT; Elbohouty, M; Lin, Oliver; Voss, LJ; Jones, K; Steyn-Ross, DA (2014)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    We report on an experimental method to measure conductivity of cortical tissue. We use a pair of 5mm diameter Ag/AgCl electrodes in a Perspex sandwich device that can be brought to a distance of 400 microns apart. The apparatus is brought to uniform temperature before use. Electrical impedance of a sample is measured across the frequency range 20 Hz-2.0 MHz with an Agilent 4980A four-point impedance monitor in a shielded room. The equipment has been used to measure the conductivity of mature mouse brain cortex in vitro. Slices 400 microns in thickness are prepared on a vibratome. Slices are bathed in artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF) to keep them alive. Slices are removed from the ACSF and sections of cortical tissue approximately 2 mm times 2 mm are cut with a razor blade. The sections are photographed through a calibrated microscope to allow identification of their cross-sectional areas. Excess ACSF is removed from the sample and the sections places between the electrodes. The impedance is measured across the frequency range and electrical conductivity calculated. Results show two regions of dispersion. A low frequency region is evident below approximately 10 kHz, and a high frequency dispersion above this. Results at the higher frequencies show a good fit to the Cole-Cole model of impedance of biological tissue; this model consists of resistive and non-linear capacitive elements. Physically, these elements are likely to arise due to membrane polarization and migration of ions both intra- and extra-cellularly.

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  • Diphthong trajectories in Māori

    King, J; Watson, Catherine; Maclagan, M; Keegan, Peter; Harlow, R (2014-12-03)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Sound change over time has been identified in monophthongs in Māori, the language of the indigenous people of NZ [1], with /u u:/ fronting, the mid vowels rising, so that /i~i:~e~e:/ can appear identical, and the quantitative distinctions between long and short monophthongs being reduced apart from /a~a:/ [1], [2]. The five most frequent diphthongs in Māori are /ai ae au ou ao/. Analysis has shown mergers between two pairs of these diphthongs, /ai~ae/ and /au~ou/ [3]. This study argued that only one of these mergers is due to the monophthong movements: we have shown that /e e:/ have risen [3], but the second target of /ae/ is falling. It was suggested that this merger is due to glide weakening of /ai/. The merger of /au/ and /ou/ is probably influenced by the fronting of /u u:/. The major distinction for /au ou/ is in the first target, but the fronting of T1 for both /au/ and /ou/ is highly correlated both to the fronting of T2, and the fronting of /u u:/ [3]. Diphthong analysis to date has only offered schematic formant trajectories with arrows from T1 to T2 indicating the movement [2], [3]. Here we present for the first time an analysis of the vowel mergers looking at the entire diphthong trajectories, for T1 and T2 for the male speakers. These plots reveal the course and timing of the diphthong movements.

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  • Population Pharmacokinetics of Ethanol in Moderate and Heavy Drinkers

    Jiang, Y; Holford, Nicholas; Murry, DJ; Brown, TL; Milavetz, G (2015-10-07)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Objectives: To investigate the effect of sex, age, and previous drinking history on ethanol pharmacokinetic parameters with the implementation of a rate dependent extraction model [1], which takes into account the change in hepatic first-pass extraction along with absorption rate and a body composition model that accounts for fat free mass and fat mass [2]. Methods: 108 moderate or heavy drinkers were dosed orally on 2 occasions to achieve a peak blood ethanol concentration of 0.65 g/L or 1.15 g/L using a randomized, crossover design. A total of 6025 breath measurements were obtained and converted into blood alcohol concentration by applying a blood: breath ratio of 2100:1. NONMEM 7.3.0 was used for data analysis. A semi-mechanistic rate dependent extraction model with zero-order input followed by first order absorption was utilized with V allometrically scaled by normal fat mass, Vmax allometrically scaled by total body weight and portal vein blood flow allometrically scaled by fat free mass. The effects of sex and age (21–34, 38–51, or 55–68 years of age) on V, Vmax, and Km; and the effect of drinking status (moderate or heavy drinkers) on Vmax and Km were explored. The covariate effect was considered to be statistically significant if the 95 % non-parametric bootstrap confidence interval of the fractional difference did not include 1. Results: The 95 % bootstrap confidence interval of fractional differences between groups in age, sex and ethanol consumption history all contain 1, indicating none of those covariates have significant effects on any ethanol disposition parameters. Conclusions: Age and sex were not regarded as significant predictors for ethanol disposition parameters after accounting for body size and composition. The results indicated a 19 % higher Vmax and 15 % lower Km for heavy drinkers compared with moderate drinkers, but the difference was not statistically significant.

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  • Similar estimates of contrast sensitivity and acuity from psychophysics and automated analysis of optokinetic nystagmus

    Dakin, Steven; Turnbull, Philip (2016-05-14)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Although the contrast sensitivity function (CSF) is a particularly useful way of characterising functional vision, its psychophysical measurement relies on observers being able to make reliable perceptual reports. This can be challenging e.g. when testing children. Here we describe a system for measuring the CSF without observer-report using an automated analysis of optokinetic nystagmus (OKN), an oscillatory eye movement made in response to moving stimuli (here, spatial-frequency - SF - band-pass noise). We show that predicting perceived direction using the proportion of eye movements that are consistent with OKN in the stimulus direction allows us to make an unbiased estimate of contrast sensitivity across SF. We next compare CSFs of 25 observers derived using either OKN or perceptual report. Both approaches yield near-identical CSFs that capture subtle inter-observer variations in acuity (R=0.80, p< 0.0001) and contrast sensitivity (R=0.80, p< 0.0001) amongst observers with ostensibly normal vision. A trial-by-trial analysis reveals that, even when observers' perceptual report is at chance, there is a very high correlation between our OKN-derived measure and observers' perceptual report. This indicates that OKN and self-report are likely tapping into a common neural mechanism providing further support for the proposal that OKN is a valid alternative to the current gold standard measures of CSF based on perceptual report. We discuss how our approach can be paired with an efficient psychophysical method to derive rapid automated measures of the CSF and other measures of functional vision.

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  • Forbidden crystals: Penrose tiling with molecules

    Nam, SJ; Waterhouse, GIN; Ware, David; Brothers, Penelope (2015-02-08)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Since the first discovery of quasicrystals by mathematicians in the 1960s, quasicrystalline patterns which possess unusual symmetric orders have become an issue among mathematicians. Observation of 5-fold crystal symmetry in metal alloys in 1984 has attracted other scientists. Penrose tiling is the simplest quasicrystal comprised of only pentagon motifs. Although quasicrystals have been observed in alloys and soft matter states (polymers, colloids), no one has yet successfully generated full molecular quasicrystals. Only small pieces of molecular Penrose tiling have been reported. We are working on this challenge by using molecules with 5-fold symmetry as molecular ‘tiles’ to create 2-dimensional molecular Penrose tilings. Alignment of the tiles is the key to creating the quasicrystalline pattern. Possible candidates as tiles which must be synthetically accessible are croconate and its derivatives, macrocycles such as campestarene and supramolecules such as cucurbituril. The techniques of coordination and supramolecular chemistry will direct the ordering of the tiles. After deposition of the synthesised tiles on substrates, surface imaging (STM and AFM) and analytical techniques (XPS, LEED, GI-SAXS) will be used to investigate the resulting films.

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  • Characterisation of the Genetic Controls of Branching in Petunia

    Simons, Joanne; Templeton, KR; Plummer, K; Beveridge, CA; Snowden, KC (2005-10-12)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Branching is a fundamental process affecting plant form and is a source of much of the wide variety of plant architecture seen in nature. Our aim is to understand the function of genes involved in branching using petunia as a model system. This research involves the study of the decreased apical dominance (dad) mutants in petunia, which have increased basal branching compared with wild type. It also involves the investigation of genes known to affect branching in other plant species to discover their effects in petunia. One of these genes, MAX2, was identified from an increased branching mutant in Arabidopsis, and its effects in petunia are being investigated by misexpression of the petunia orthologue. Previous grafting experiments using the dad mutants in petunia have shown that a graft-transmissible signal is involved in causing the increased branching phenotype. Hormones are graft-transmissible chemicals and variation in their levels play important roles in the control of apical dominance, one of the most studied controls in lateral branching. Auxin and cytokinin levels in dad mutant and wild type plants were investigated, but the levels of these hormones were not consistent with them being the graft-transmissible signal modified by the DAD genes. In order to investigate the relationships between the DAD genes, the branching phenotypes of the single and double dad mutants were characterised and analysed. Grafting experiments to investigate the interactions between the DAD genes in controlling the branching signal were also undertaken. This work has revealed interactions between the DAD genes and provided evidence for the order of action of these genes.

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  • Investigation into the racemic X-ray structure of the antimicrobial protein snakin-1

    Yeung, Ho; Yosaatmadja, Yuliana; Squire, Christopher; Harris, Paul; Baker, Edward; Brimble, Margaret (2015-08-31)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Snakin-1 is a 63 residue antimicrobial protein originally isolated from potato (Solanum tuberosum).1 It is active against a number of bacterial and fungal phytopathogens such as Clavibacter michiganensis, Pseudomonas syringae and Fusarium solani. Snakin-1 is a member of the GASA (gibberellic acid stimulated in Arabidopsis)/snakin family and the mature protein consists of a GASA domain incorporating six intramolecular disulfide bonds.2 The amino acid sequences of these proteins do not correspond to any known structural motifs. GASA/snakin proteins are found in a variety of plant species and appear to be involved in a range of functions including cell elongation and cell division.2 Their expression profiles support these roles and are commonly linked to development.2 It has also been speculated that the 12 conserved cysteines in these proteins perform a role in redox regulation.2 We have recently completed the total chemical synthesis of native Snakin-1 and showed that its antimicrobial activity is comparable to that of the naturally occurring protein.3 In an attempt to understand how this small protein functions we have determined its threedimensional structure by X-ray crystallography using a quasi-racemic protein system.4 Phase information for structural determination was obtained by radiation-damage induced phasing.5 The structure of snakin-1 appears to be novel, different to known classes of cysteine-rich plant antimicrobial peptide. Its features include a large and distinctly electropositive loop that we speculate to be membrane targeting, and a two helix bundle which is a potential membrane-interacting feature able to disrupt the structural integrity of its target bacteria.

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  • Synthesis and mechanistic studies of PLA₂ inihibition by the marine alkaloid hyrtiosulawesine

    Liew, Lydia; Bourguet-Kondracki, M-L; Copp, Brent (2010-10-17)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The first isolation of hyrtiosulawesine (1) was from an Indonesian collection of the marine sponges Hyrtios erectus and H. reticulatus.1 The β-carboline alkaloid was subsequently re-isolated from a Red Sea collection of Hyrtios sp. and found to display anti-phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity with an IC50 value of 14 μM. Phospholipase A2 catalyses the hydrolysis of membrane phospholipids at the sn-2 position to generate arachidonic acids (AA).3,4 AA are precursors to a large family of compounds known as the eicosanoids associated with inflammatory reactions.4 PLA2 inhibition by hyrtiosulawesine would lead to a decrease in AA and proinflammatory eicosanoids, with anti-inflammatory effect.4 In an effort to understand the structural attributes of the natural product (1) that cause PLA2 inhibition, hyrtiosulawesine and a series of related model compounds (2, 3) will be synthesised and evaluated for biological activity. Biomimetic nucleophiles will be used to probe hyrtiosulawesine and related compounds in order to determine their reactivity and possible site of reaction. Bioactive members of the library of compounds will subsequently be subjected to reaction with bee venom phospholipase A2 to identify the presence of any covalent adducts. Further studies may be directed to discovering the nature and location of the covalent linkage within the enzyme active site. The latest results will be presented. References 1. Salmoun, M.; Devijver, C.; Daloze, D.; Braekman, J.-C.; Van Soest, R. W. M. J. Nat. Prod. 2002, 65, 1173-1176. 2. Sauleau, P.; Martin, M.-T.; Dau, M.-E. T. H.; Youssef, D. T. A.; Bourguet-Kondracki, M.-L. J. Nat. Prod. 2006, 69, 1676-1679. 3. Balsinde, J.; Balboa, M. A.; Insel, P. A.; Dennis, E. A. Annu. Rev. Pharmacol. Toxicol. 1999, 39, 175-189. 4. Parente, L. J. Rheumatol. 2001, 28, 2375-2382.

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  • Polyamine diamide orthidine F as a potent and selective antimalarial lead compound

    Liew, Lydia; Kaiser, M; Copp, B (2013)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    THE POLYAMINE DIAMIDE ORTHIDINE F AS A POTENT AND SELECTIVE ANTIMALARIAL LEAD COMPOUND Orthidine F (1) was isolated from an extract of the marine organism Aplidium orthium, found at Three Kings Islands, New Zealand.1 An initial screen of the natural product 1 against a panel of parasitic protozoa (Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, Trypanosoma cruzi, Leishmania donovani and Plasmodium falciparum K1 dual drug-resistant strain) identified selective inhibitory activity for T. brucei rhodesiense (IC50 78 μM) against T. cruzi, no detectable activity towards L. donovani and moderate activity against P. falciparum. Furthermore, the natural product was found to be non-toxic in the non-malignant L6 rat myoblast cell line, thus representing an attractive target as an antiparasitic drug. A preliminary structure-activity relationship (SAR) study identified analogues with a similar activity profile to the natural product. The analogues were found to exhibit moderate inhibitory activity against T. brucei rhodesiense (IC50 3.2–210 μM), more potent inhibitory activity against P. falciparum (IC50 0.0086–0.61 μM), and no significant activity against T. cruzi and L. donovani. The analogues also continued to display little or no cytotoxic effect in the L6 cell line, this combined with the potent IC50 values obtained for inhibition of P. falciparum afforded a series of analogues with impressive properties which warranted further studies. This led to a second series of analogues with the intention of improving its antimalarial activity. The analogues generated from this exercise exhibited potent in vitro activities (IC50 0.0086–0.61 μM) while retaining selectivity against P. falciparum. Three analogues were selected based on the in vitro data obtained and evaluated for in vivo activity in the Plasmodium berghei mouse model of malaria; which in this instance did not yield significant activity.

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  • Gorgeous Gallery: residential aged care in New Zealand, in pictures

    Broad, Joanna (2015)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Considering clinical protocols and guidelines: what lessons for IPE?

    Barrow, Mark; Gasquoine, S (2016-08-30)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background: Interprofessional collaboration is enhanced if professionals work across discursive boundaries. While interprofessional education interventions may encourage this the practice environment may militate against the implementation of understandings developed in educational settings. Summary of work: Interviews with doctors and nurses highlighted differences between each professions’ views of clinical protocols and guidelines. This prompted us to conduct a critical discourse analysis of a number of clinical guidelines and the systems which guide their development and approval. Summary of results: Our analysis shows a range of discourses at work within clinical protocols régimes. Development and approval systems are dominated by collectivist discourses emphasising communication and collaboration within rigid bureaucratic systems. The protocols exemplify a neo-liberal discourse where people who are the objects of care are positioned as clients or consumers amenable to standardised aliquots of diagnosis and care, the level of which can be justified on the basis of scoring systems and claims related to a ‘scientific’ evidence base. The régimes also suggests (perhaps falsely) flattened hierarchical structures, a democratising discourse where all professional voices are equal in the provision of care. Discussion: A nursing identity relies on experience, holistic views of patients and collective approaches to practice. The medical identity is based on craft-based development of expertise associated with generating distinctive and sometime idiosyncratic responses to a patient’s needs. Each comes to protocols with different ‘agenda’. Conclusions: The collectivist discourse of protocol development does not seem to carry through to their utilisation. Protocols appear to act as objects that reinforce discursive boundaries between the groups. Take-home messages: Educators need to consider the effect of protocols on practice and account for this in the design of educational interventions. Understanding the discursive roll of protocols might help educators design more robust IPE programmes.

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  • Novel release method proves successful: The gum leaf skeletoniser parasitoid Cotesia urabae establishes in two new locations

    Gresham, BA; Withers, TM; Avila Olesen, Gonzalo; Berndt, LA (2014-08-12)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The Australian braconid wasp Cotesia urabae was first released in New Zealand in 2011, as a biological control agent for the gum leaf skeletoniser Uraba lugens (Lepidoptera: Nolidae). The larvae of this moth predominantly attack Eucalyptus spp. (Class: Symphyomyrtus) and, since its predicted future geographic range is extensive, there is concern it could become a serious pest of eucalypt plantations in New Zealand. Initial releases of C. urabae using adult parasitoids were made in Auckland at three separate sites between January and June 2011. Cotesia urabae established at each site and preliminary monitoring has revealed that the wasps have naturally dispersed to six other sites, ranging up to 6 km from an initial release site. In January 2012, C. urabae were released in Whangarei and Tauranga, trialling a novel method using parasitoid-attacked host larvae, rather than adult parasitoids. This method proved to be successful, with establishment now confirmed in both of these locations, and also provided greater flexibility. The two latest releases were made using the same method in Nelson (October 2013) and Napier (February 2014), but it is not yet known if the parasitoid has successfully established in these locations.

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  • Effect of contact lens induced retinal defocus on the thickness of the human choroid

    Chiang, Samuel; Backhouse, S; Phillips, John (2014-04-22)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to describe the amplitude and time-course of choroidal thickness changes induced by imposed hyperopic and myopic retinal defocus and to compare the responses in emmetropic and myopic subjects. METHODS Twelve Asian subjects (6 emmetropes and 6 myopes) aged between 18 and 34 years had OCT images of the choroid taken in both eyes at 5 min intervals while exposed to monocular defocus (random right or left eye) for 60 min; the fellow eye was kept optimally corrected (no defocus). Two different monocular defocus conditions (2 D hyperopic or 2 D myopic defocus) were tested on separate occasions. Thickness changes were measured as absolute changes in microns. RESULTS Prior to applying defocus, mean choroidal thickness in myopic eyes (mean ± SD, 256.30µm ± 41.24µm) was significantly less than in emmetropic eyes (mean ± SD, 423.09µm ± 60.69µm) (p<0.05) in 60 minutes. No significant difference was found between emmetropes and myopes in changes of choroidal thickness with the two types of defocus. CONCLUSIONS Small but significant choroidal thickness changes occurred when human eyes were exposed to both myopic and hyperopic monocular defocus. In each case these changes acted to move the retina towards the altered image plane, so as to reduce the degree of defocus. In this small sample we could detect no difference in responses of myopic eyes compared to emmetropic eyes.

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  • Searching for anomalous light curves in massive data sets

    Rattenbury, Nicholas (2014-01-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The photometric surveys currently under way by the MOA and OGLE collaborations have produced and are extending databases of millions of stellar light curves. These databases have allowed investigations into diverse astrophysical fields including variable stars, proper motion studies and Galactic structure. Odd, or otherwise curious events have been discovered in the databases. We consider here one such event and propose methods for discovering more like it in the microlensing databases. A further aim of this initial work is to set out the prospects of the classification scheme for identifying time series that are maximally discordant - i.e. those that do not look like any other time series in the data set, and which therefore, may be of particular interest.

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  • What is known about the experience of CPAP for OSA from the users’ perspective? A systematic integrative literature review

    Ward, Kim; Gott, M (2013-10-29)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Introduction: The estimated economic, social and personal cost of untreated obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is high. Night time continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is a recommended, cost effective and popular treatment. The predicted global increase in obesity will lead to increasing prevalence of OSA. Exploring management of CPAP from the user perspective is crucial to successful administration of this therapy. The objective was synthesis of the international evidence base regarding users’ experience of night time continuous positive airway pressure therapy for obstructive sleep apnoea. Materials and methods: A systematic integrative literature review was conducted and quality assessment criteria applied. Results: From 538 identified papers, 22 met inclusion criteria. Thematic analysis identified four themes: (1) evidence regarding experience of CPAP and issues of research design; (2) CPAP influenced by users’ views and beliefs; (3) CPAP investigated using a language of difficulty; and (4) spouse and family impact on CPAP use. Overall, research relating to user experience of CPAP is limited. Understanding is incomplete because of problems of study design, for example the use of pre-determined checklists and survey questions. The problem oriented terminology adopted by most studies is also likely to set up the expectation that users will encounter difficulties with CPAP. There is evidence that personality and attitude impact expectations about CPAP prior to and during use, whilst engagement of spouse, family and colleagues also influence experience. Conclusion: This comprehensive integrative review identified limited evidence about experiencing CPAP from the users’ perspective. Current research is constrained by researchers’ concern with non-compliance. Typically experiences of CPAP are not defined by the user, but from an ‘expert’ healthcare perspective, using language that defines CPAP as problematic. Family and social support is a significant, but underexplored, element of experiencing CPAP and warrants further investigation. Research that more comprehensively involves CPAP users is required to determine how patients manage this therapy successfully.

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  • PUKUmahi!: Kia whai te huarahi tika. NETwork! Roadmap for safe travel: Ensuring health benefits flow on to Māori

    Henare, Kimiora; Parker, K; Print, Cristin; Findlay, Michael; Lawrence, Benjamin (2015-11-02)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Neuroendocrine tumours (NET) are complex and variable, making it very difficult for clinicians to determine the best course of treatment. The NETwork project seeks to better understand the epidemiological impact of NETs in New Zealand, and to better characterise the disease to help inform oncologists how to treat it. The estimated incidence rate of patients with NETs in New Zealand is approximately 200 patients per year, however the impact among Māori is not yet known. Māori are disproportionately burdened by cancers of the lungs, stomach, and pancreas, so it is tempting to speculate that NET incidence among Māori could also be high. It is essential that Māori are involved in the study in order to get an accurate indication of the impact of this cancer in New Zealand, what genes are driving the cancers, and how each can be treated. The multi-faceted NETwork project combines epidemiological analysis and deep genome sequencing of retrospective and prospective NET tissues. Under the guidelines set out in Te Ara Tika, the design of this research project is mainstream, but is likely to involve Māori participants and have direct relevance to Māori. Despite being neither Māori-centred nor Kaupapa Māori in our approach, the NETwork team are dedicated to honouring the Treaty of Waitangi principles of partnership, participation, and protection. Mindful of the past transgressions involving the use of tissues and genetic information obtained from indigenous populations here in New Zealand and overseas, the NETwork group are keen not to repeat these errors themselves, nor facilitate the opportunity for others to do so. Following ongoing consultation with Te Mata Ira, Maui Hudson, Dr Helen Wihongi, and Associate Professor Papaarangi Reid, we have established a ‘roadmap for safe travel’ to guide all aspects of the multi-faceted project. The framework has three key principles (kawa) underpinning its Governance structure, and three core cultural protocols (tikanga) to be incorporated into the implementation strategies. Adhering to these kawa and tikanga should facilitate the establishment and maintenance of relationships with key stakeholders; a vital aspect to the project. The roadmap for safe travel is still in its early stages of development, and consultation is ongoing. Nevertheless, the NETwork team have a strong platform from which to further develop their project. Although the presented framework is specific to the NETwork project, it could easily be adjusted and utilised for other clinical and biomedical projects.

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