428 results for Conference poster

  • Presence in Video-mediated Communication: Does being there help to come together?

    Hauber, J.; Regenbrecht, H.; Billinghurst, M.; Teoh, H. (2006)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Clinical Data Validation of an improved, physiologically relevant Critical Care Glycaemic Control Model

    Pretty, C.G.; Parente, J.; Razak, N.; Lin, J.; LeCompte, A.J.; Shaw, G.M.; Hann, C.E.; Chase, J.G. (2008)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    Introduction: Stress induced hyperglycaemia is prevalent in critical care. Tight glycaemic control is associated with significantly improved clinical outcomes. Providing tight control is difficult due to evolving patient condition and drug therapies. Model-based/derived methods (e.g. SPRINT) have shown significant mortality reductions. This research validates an improved metabolic control model and its parameters based on predictive capability for use in real-time glycaemic control.

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  • The Effectiveness of Traffic Calming Pinch-Points

    Chai, C.; Nicholson, A.; Koorey, Glen (2011)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    Research investigated the effect of roadway widths for street narrowings or "pinch-points" in Christchurch, with a particular focus on speed and yielding behaviour. A 6m wide 2-way pinch-point was found to be not effective in slowing most private vehicles down. Drivers travelled at a similar speed whether they were crossing the pinch-point by themselves or with opposing traffic approaching. Approximately 40% of drivers reduced their vehicle speed when negotiating a 5m wide 2-way pinch-point. Around 20% of drivers avoided traversing with oncoming traffic and opted to wait until it was clear before proceeding. Male drivers also tended to travel faster through the narrowing when compared to female drivers. For a 4.5m wide 1-way pinch-point where motor vehicles and cyclists approached them simultaneously, one of them gave way and waited nearly60% of the time. Around 35% of the time cyclists and motorists shared the narrowing and 8% of the cyclists (mostly younger children) avoided the narrowing, using a bypass instead. It is recommended that further research be conducted: 1. at more sites with different road widths and environment; 2. with heavy vehicle movements on these pinch-points; 3. to understand whether a longer pinch-point will alter driver behaviour.

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  • Public Perception of Earthquake Risks & Retrofitting of Heritage Buildings

    Yakubu, I.E.; Egbelakin, T.; Park, K.; Phipps, R. (2016)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    This study aims to examine the public perception of earthquake risks and retrofitting of heritage buildings in New Zealand. In doing so, the study will seek: a. To examine the perception of the public concerning their earthquake safety in heritage buildings; b. To determine the level of value that the public attach to heritage buildings; c. To ascertain public preparedness in accepting a lower level of earthquake safety in order to retain heritage buildings; d. To examine how the public perception on earthquake occurrences, cultural values, and heritage preservation impact the degree of adoption of a nationally consistent approach that will address the risks posed by earthquakes and retrofitting of heritage buildings; e. To identify other attributes besides heritage where the public is prepared to accept a greater earthquake risk.

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  • Horizontal-Vertical Coupling of a Building Frame System in Shake Table Testing to 3D Motions

    Guzman-Pujols, Jean; Ryan, Keri (2016)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    A large-scale, shake-table test program was conducted with a goal to promote rapid spread of base isolation systems in Japan and the U.S. A small steel frame building with and without base isolation was subjected to 2D and 3D shaking at E-Defense. Coupling of the horizontal and vertical response as well as high intensity slab vibration contributed to nonstructural damage in the building. Strong coupling in a configuration with triple pendulum bearings (TPB) was shown to result from the friction mechanism in the bearings. However, the source of coupling in a configuration with a hybrid isolation system (lead rubber bearings or LRB and cross-linear rolling bearings) and the fixed-base building configuration has not yet been explained.

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  • Hearing aid usage in different listening environments

    Eddie, S.; Lin, E. (2006)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    Abstract 0166/Poster Board 314

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  • Diagnosis using a minimal cardiac model including reflex actions

    Hann, C.E.; Chase, J.G.; Andreassen, S.; Smith, B.W.; Shaw, G.M. (2005)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    Heart disease is difficult to diagnose due to often confusing clinical a data. A minimal cardiac model has been developed that captures the major dynamics of the cardiovascular system (CVS). To assist medical staff in diagnosis and treatment, a fast accurate patient-specific parameter identification method, which can account for time varying disease state and the body’s natural reflex response, is required.

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  • Model-based therapeutics for the Cardiovascular System - a Clinical Focus

    Hann, C.E.; Chase, J.G.; Desaive, T.; Lambermont, B.; Ghuysen, A.; Kolh, P.; Shaw, G.M. (2009)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    6-pages (invited)

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  • Ground motion selection for seismic response analysis

    Bradley, B.A. (2010)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    Poster 47

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  • Maximum Entropy modeling of invasive plants in the forests of Cumberland Plateau and Mountain Region

    Lemke, D.; Hulme, P.; Brown, J.A.; Tadesse, W. (2010)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    This research explores the integration of GIS and remote sensing with statistical analysis to assist in species distribution modeling of invasive species. It is applicable to both native and non-native species and has the ability to assist land managers in identifying both areas of importance and areas of threat.

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  • Landing size of harvesting operations in New Zealand

    Visser, R.; Spinelli, R.; Magagnotti, N. (2010)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    Landings are an integral part of modern whole-tree harvesting operations in New Zealand. A representative sample of 142 landings was measured using GPS, whereby nine were recently constructed and unused, 34 were live and the remaining 99 were older and closed out. The average landing size was 3900 m², with a range from 1370 to 12540m². On average, the number of log-sorts cut was 11, the landings were in use for 4 weeks, estimated daily production was 287 m³/day, 37% were manual processing (63% mechanised), 81% were grapple loader (19% front-end loader). A regression equation to model landing size indicates that number of log sorts and production levels are the two main driving factors. Landings do tend to ‘grow’ over time, with used landings on average being 560m² larger than live ones, which in turn were 280m² larger than recently constructed (unused) landings. Most recently constructed landings were larger than the company design; whereby either 40mx60m or 40mx80m were common specifications. A comparable study in 1987 showed the average landing to be just over 1900m², indicating landing size has nearly doubled in the last 20 years. Landings serviced by front-end loaders were slightly larger than those serviced by grapple, but this is compounded by front-end loaders being more commonly used in high production systems. Analyses of the schematic drawings for the live landings indicate that as landing size grows, there is a preference for using multiple rows to manage log inventory on the landing. Smaller landings typically prefer to stack around the edge of the landings.

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  • In Vivo Effects of Reduced-Sodium Perilymph Perfusion on Hair Cell and Neural Potentials

    O'Beirne, G.A.; Patuzzi, R.B. (2007)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    To determine the functional significance of the sodium-transport mechanisms of the outer hair cells (OHCs) in vivo, the effect of reduced perilymphatic sodium on cochlear potentials was investigated in the guinea pig by perfusion of scala tympani with a modified artificial perilymph. The Na+ concentration of the artificial perilymph was reduced by almost 95% (from 150 mM to 8 mM) by substitution with choline, and resulted in an estimated 80% reduction in perilymphatic Na+ on perfusion through scala tympani. OHC function was assessed using Boltzmann analysis of the low-frequency cochlear microphonic (CM) and measurement of the high-frequency summating potential (SP) recorded at the round window. Compound action potential (CAP) thresholds and waveforms were monitored at multiple frequencies and the amplitude of the spectrum of the neural noise (SNN) in silence was measured as an indicator of spontaneous neural activity.

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  • Effectiveness of visual biofeedback in speech training of children with hearing impairment

    Reid, E.; Lin, E. (2006)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    Abstract 1951/Poster Board 265

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  • Highly correlated model-based testing of insulin sensitivity – initial results for a proposed low-intensity test

    Lotz, T.; Chase, J.G.; McAuley, K.A.; Shaw, G.M.; Wong, X-W.; Lin, J.; LeCompte, A.; Hann, C.E.; Mann, J.I. (2006)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Identifying music documents in a collection of images

    Bainbridge, D.; Bell, T. (2006)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    Digital libraries and search engines are now well-equipped to find images of documents based on queries. Many images of music scores are now available, often mixed up with textual documents and images. For example, using the Google “images” search feature, a search for “Beethoven” will return a number of scores and manuscripts as well as pictures of the composer. In this paper we report on an investigation into methods to mechanically determine if a particular document is indeed a score, so that the user can specify that only musical scores should be returned. The goal is to find a minimal set of features that can be used as a quick test that will be applied to large numbers of documents. A variety of filters were considered, and two promising ones (run-length ratios and Hough transform) were evaluated. We found that a method based around run-lengths in vertical scans (RL) that out-performs a comparable algorithm using the Hough transform (HT). On a test set of 1030 images, RL achieved recall and precision of 97.8% and 88.4% respectively while HT achieved 97.8% and 73.5%. In terms of processor time, RL was more than five times as fast as HT.

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  • Earthquakes, Trees, and the 'New Normal'

    Morgenroth, J. (2011)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Evaluating a Temporal Behaviour for Web Browsers' Back and Forward Buttons

    Cockburn, A.; McKenzie, B.; JasonSmith, M. (2002)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    This paper describes the evaluation of a ‘temporal’ alternative to the normal ‘stack-based’ behaviour of the Back and Forward buttons on web browsers. The main difference of the temporal scheme is that it maintains a complete list of previously visited pages. Results confirmed our prediction that the major limitation of the temporal system is in returning to parent pages. They also showed that the temporal scheme allowed many users to solve complex navigation tasks more efficiently than the stack system. Overall, the results are positive and indicate that the temporal scheme can be adapted to improve web navigation.

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  • Acoustic Analysis in Foreign Accent Syndrome: A Case Study

    Walker, J.; Lin, E. (2006)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    Abstract 1481/Poster Board 174

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  • The impact of breathiness on the intelligibility of speech

    Thompson, L.; Lin, E.; Robb, M.P. (2011)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    The aim of this study is to determine how deterioration of voice quality, such as breathiness, may impact on the intelligibility of speech. Acoustic analysis was conducted on sustained vowel phonation as well as discrete segments taken from recorded sentences, retrieved from a database of voice disordered speakers. Measures included: frequency of the first two formants (F1, F2), singing power ratio, the amplitude difference between the first two harmonics (H1-H2 amplitude difference), voice onset time, and energy ratio between consonant and vowel (CV ratio). A series of two-way (glottal closure x vowel) repeated measures Analysis of Variances conducted on these acoustic measures showed a significant glottal closure (complete vs. incomplete) or glottal closure by vowel interaction effect for the F2 frequency, H1-H2 amplitude difference, and singing power ratio. Based on findings in literature that reported a dominant first harmonic as a useful predictor of breathiness, the measure of H1-H2 amplitude difference was selected as a factor for investigation of the impact of voice quality on the perception of vowel intelligibility and clarity. Fixed-length vowel segments at five levels of H1-H2 amplitude difference were presented to 10 male and 10 female inexperienced listeners between the ages of 19 and 34 years. It was expected that the tokens with a dominant first harmonic, indicative of a more breathy voice, would be associated with a lower rate of correct vowel identification and a lower rate of being perceived as “clearer”. The finding of a change of the perceptual ratings as a function of the H1-H2 amplitude difference will demonstrate the effect of voice quality on vowel intelligibility.

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  • Simulation of site amplification effects at Heathcote Valley during the 2010-2011 Canterbury earthquakes

    Jeong, Seokho; Bradley, Brendon (2016)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    Heathcote Valley school strong motion station (HVSC) consistently recorded ground motions with higher intensities than nearby stations during the 2010-2011 Canterbury earthquakes. For example, as shown in Figure 1, for the 22 February 2011 Christchurch earthquake, peak ground acceleration at HVSC reached 1.4 g (horizontal) and 2 g (vertical), the largest ever recorded in New Zealand. Strong amplification of ground motions is expected at Heathcote Valley due to: 1) the high impedance contrast at the soil-rock interface, and 2) the interference of incident and surface waves within the valley. However, both conventional empirical ground motion prediction equations (GMPE) and the physics-based large scale ground motions simulations (with empirical site response) are ineffective in predicting such amplification due to their respective inherent limitations.

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