231 results for Conference poster

  • Who are Today's Dads?

    Underwood, Lisa; Atatoa Carr, P; Berry, S; Grant, Cameron; Morton, Susan (2015-12-14)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Wind power in New Zealand Renewable energy resource dynamics in a hydro-based power system

    Suomalainen, Anna-Kristiina; Pritchard, G; Sharp, Basil; Yuan, Z; Zakeri, G (2013-12-02)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Educating for disaster: Determining the core elements of a disaster curriculum for social work in New Zealand

    Adamson, Carole (2012)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    In 2010 and 2011, Aotearoa New Zealand was hit by a number of major disasters involving loss of human life and severe disruption to social, ecological and economic wellbeing. The Pike River mine explosions were closely followed by a sequence of major earthquakes in Christchurch, seismic events that have permanently altered the lives of thousands of people in our third largest city, the closure of the central business district and the effective abandonment of whole residential areas. In early October 2011, the ship, Rena, grounded on a reef off the port of Tauranga and threatened a major oil spill throughout the Bay of Plenty, where local communities with spiritual and cultural connections to the land depend on sea food as well as thrive on tourism. The Council for Social Work Education Aotearoa New Zealand (CSWEANZ), representing all the Schools of Social Work in New Zealand, held a ‘Disaster Curriculum’ day in November 2011, at which social workers and Civil Defence leaders involved in the Christchurch earthquakes, the Rena Disaster, Fiji floods and the Boxing Day tsunami presented their narrative experience of disaster response and recovery. Workshops discussed and identified core elements that participants considered vital to a social work curriculum that would enable social work graduates in a range of community and cultural settings to respond in safe, creative and informed ways. We present our core ideas for a social work disaster curriculum and consider a wide range of educational content based on existing knowledge bases and new content within a disaster framework.

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  • Cardiac response to weak electrical shocks challenges the functional syncytium paradigm

    Caldwell, Bryan; Trew, Mark; Pertsov, AM (2015-04-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Annotation of Clinical Datasets Using openEHR Archetypes

    Zivaljevic, Aleksandar; Atalag, Koray; de Bono, B; Hunter, Peter (2015-02-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Clever Crosswalking - what do you take from one system to another?

    Zhao, Yanan; Shepherd, Kim; Hayes, Sharron; Schweer, A (2013)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The poster looked at a metadata crosswalk implemented between a DSpace repository and a Research Management System (RMS) at the University of Auckland (UoA). The crosswalk facilitated the exposure of publication metadata from the internal RMS to the DSpace repository with the least amount of work and highest amount of accuracy.

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  • Cortisol response to Synacthen stimulation is attenuated following abusive head trauma

    Heather, N; Derraik, J; Brennan, C; Hofman, Paul; Jefferies, C; Cutfield, W (2012-06-23)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • First born children have reduced insulin sensitivity, higher blood pressure and taller stature than later born children

    Savage, T; Ayyavoo, A; Mouat, F; Miles, H; Hofman, Paul; Cutfield, WS (2012-07-31)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The Effects of a Vitamin D, Omega 3, Co-enzyme Q10, Zeaxanthin, Lutein and Astaxanthin Supplement (Lester’s Oil) on Healthy People: Preliminary Results.

    Laing, Bobbi; Ellett, S; Marlow, G; Han, Dug; Jesuthasan, A; Ferguson, Lynnette (2014-08-25)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background: Diet is a key component in the disease susceptibility of individuals. Reducing inflammation especially in people with inflammatory disorders is thought to decrease disease susceptibility. The aim of this trial was to investigate the effects of a dietary supplement which contains Vitamin D, Omega 3, Co-enzyme Q10, Zeaxanthin, Lutein and Astaxanthion inflammatory markers in healthy people. Methods: The cross over trial was double blinded, randomised and placebo controlled. The study population (n = 30) was recruited from Auckland, New Zealand. The intervention or placebo was for 28 days, followed by a washout of 28 days followed by the placebo or intervention for 28 days. In this preliminary analysis blood samples were measured for C-Reactive protein (CRP), HDL, LDL, Triglycerides and cholesterol levels. A quality of life questionnaire, height and weight were also assessed. Results: Analysis of these measures found significant differences between the intervention and placebo groups for CRP (p < 0.0288) HDL (p < 0.0019) and triglycerides (p < 0.0091). Conclusion: In this preliminary analysis the supplement was shown to be effective in reducing key inflammatory markers in healthy people.

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  • Retrospective case-series from a Myopia Control Clinic

    Turnbull, Philip; Phillips, John (2015-10-09)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background: The prevalence of myopia continues to grow, and there are now a number of optical treatment options available to clinicians. However real world clinical data on their effectiveness is sparse. To promote anti-myopia treatments, a specialist Myopia Control Clinic (MCC) opened as a referral clinic at The University of Auckland, New Zealand in 2010, and this is the first comprehensive audit of the clinical outcomes. Case Series: We present a retrospective case series of 110 patients (aged 4 – 33 years, mean: 12.13 ± 4.58 years, 57% female) who attended the MCC between 2010 and 2014. Of these, 56 underwent orthokeratology (OK), 32 wore dual focus soft contact lenses (DFCL), and 22 received advice only. Baseline myopia, vitreous and axial eye length, previous myopia progression, age, number of myopic parents, and gender were not different between OK and DFCL groups at baseline. However, the advice group were older (p = 0.037) and had less previous myopic progression (p = 0.001). Mean follow-up time was 1.30 ± 0.88 and 1.33 ± 0.80 years in OK and SCL groups respectively (p = 0.989). There was a significant reduction in the annualised myopia progression in both treatment groups (OK: -1.17 ± 0.55 to -0.09 ± 017D/yr, p < 0.001, DFCL: -1.15 ± 0.46 to -0.10 ± 0.23D/yr, p < 0.001). There was no difference between OK and DFCL treatment efficacy (p = 0.763), nor in axial or vitreous chamber length changes following treatment (p = 0.184). Only one adverse event was reported over the 4 year period. Conclusions: Contact lenses, whether OK or DFCL, are an effective strategy for targeting myopia progression in children. As there was no difference in the efficacy of the two methods, there are very few barriers in terms of upskilling, chair time, or capital expenditure, for any practitioner to be actively promoting myopia control treatments to at risk groups.

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  • Neonatal invasive pneumococcal disease in NewZealand in the era of conjugate pneumococcal vaccination 2009 - 2013

    Burton, C; Mount, V; Jackson, C; Heffernan, H; Best, Emma (2014-11-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Appropriate Antibiotics for Empyema at Starship Children’s Hospital

    Burton, C; Price, Neil; Best, Emma (2014-11-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Impact of conjugate pneumococcal vaccine on nasopharyngeal S.pneumoniae serotypes and antibiotic susceptibility over 7 years

    Best, Emma; Taylor, S; Tse, F; McBride, C; Stewart, Joanna; Lennon, Diana; Trenholme, A (2015-03-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • A case of overwhelming sepsis in splenectomised child

    Alkhudairi, Z; Wilson, E; Best, Emma (2015-03-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Reducing the Risks of Long-Term Human Space Exploration by Simulating Missions in an Analog Environment on Mauna Loa

    Binsted, K; Hunter, JB; Caldwell, Bryan (2012-02)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Apple Waste Preservation for Extraction of Antioxidants

    Zhan, D; Oliveira, Maria; Saleh, Z (2015-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    A huge amount of apple waste is generated from juice, cider and other apple product industries. This waste represents a cost and causes environmental problems. Apple waste is a rich source of polyphenolic compounds, mostly found in the apple peels and cores. Polyphenols are antioxidants with high value that can be extracted from the waste and exploited commercially. Proper methods of waste pasteurisation would allow its preservation and reduce waste degradation. In this study, diluted apple waste was pasteurised using three different technologies: thermal processing (TP), high pressure processing (HPP) and low pressure assisted thermal processing. The effect of processing on the waste native yeasts and moulds, inoculated Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast and antioxidants were investigated. TP at 60, 80 and 100 °C for 30 min, HPP at 300, 400 and 500 MPa for 10 min and 600 MPa for 20 min, and low pressure assisted thermal processing at 60, 80 and 100 °C with 2 MPa for 30 min were carried out. The total yeasts and moulds initially in the diluted apple waste was about 6.6×101 cfu/g, which was fully inactivated by the three technologies. S. cerevisiae inoculated in the waste was reduced by 5-log or more with all processing methods/conditions. HPP and low pressure assisted thermal processing treatments did not affect the antioxidant activity (DPPH-radical scavenging). However, both TPC and DPPH radical scavenging decreased with TP (p < 0.05). The results of this study can be helpful for designing appropriate conditions to pasteurise fruit industry byproducts for further extraction of high value antioxidants.

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  • Do you see what I see? - Surveillance and response

    Patel, Reena; Dixon, Robyn; Webster, Craig (2015-07-06)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Introduction: Early warning scoring systems and rapid response teams are important strategies to improve the detection of patient deterioration in hospitals. Initiation of an appropriate response relies on nurses recognising changes in patient condition and alerting the required emergency assistance team. Study Objective: To determine the level of concordance between the nurse’s assessment and that of the emergency team, based on early warning scores (EWS). Methods: An audit of data collected between June 2011 and May 2013 was undertaken and 2780 instances were reviewed in order to determine the degree of concordance on EWS scores between nurses initiating calls and those assigned by the emergency response team. Results: 881 instances lack of concordance was identified. In the majority of instances, the nurse overestimated the severity of the patient’s condition when compared to the emergency response team’s score. Conclusion: Such lack of concordance is problematic given that failure to activate an emergency response when required has obvious implications for patient safety while inappropriate referral to emergency response teams can result in inefficient use of resources.

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  • Variability in soil CO2 efflux across distinct urban land cover types

    Weissert, Lena; Salmond, Jennifer; Schwendenmann, Luitgard (2015-04-14)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    As a main source of greenhouse gases urban areas play an important role in the global carbon cycle. To assess the potential role of urban vegetation in mitigating carbon emissions we need information on the magnitude of biogenic CO2 emissions and its driving factors. We examined how urban land use types (urban forest, parklands, sportsfields) vary in their soil CO2 efflux.We measured soil CO2 efflux and its isotopic signature, soil temperature and soil moisture over a complete growing season in Auckland, New Zealand. Soil physical and chemical properties and vegetation characteristics were also measured. Mean soil CO2 efflux ranged from 4.15 to 12 molm 2 s 1.We did not find significant differences in soil CO2 efflux among land cover types due to high spatial variability in soil CO2 efflux among plots. Soil (soil carbon and nitrogen density, texture, soil carbon:nitrogen ratio) and vegetation characteristics (basal area, litter carbon density, grass biomass) were not significantly correlated with soil CO2 efflux. We found a distinct seasonal pattern with significantly higher soil CO2 efflux in autumn (Apr/May) and spring (Oct). In urban forests and sportsfields over 80% of the temporal variation was explained by soil temperature and soil water content. The 13C signature of CO2 respired from parklands and sportsfields (-20 permil - -25 permil) were more positive compared to forest plots (-29 permil) indicating that parkland and sportsfields had a considerable proportion of C4 grasses. Despite the large intra-urban variability, our results compare to values reported from other, often climatically different cities, supporting the hypothesis of homogenization across urban areas as a result of human management practices.

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  • Who are Today's Dads?

    Underwood, Lisa; Atatoa Carr, P; Berry, S; Grant, Cameron; Kingi, TK; Pryor, J; Nicholson, J; Verbiest, Marjolein; Morton, Susan (2016-07-06)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Dads play a crucial role in the lives of children. Who Are Today’s Dads? is a University of Auckland project related to the Growing Up in New Zealand study. We want to find out how dads shape their children’s early development, health and wellbeing. The “dads” of more than 5,000 6 year olds were invited to take part in an online questionnaire. We are interested in all “dads” not just those who are the biological fathers of their children but also step-dads, foster and/or adoptive parents, co-mums and other family members who fulfil a dad role. Another important focus of the study is the extent to which New Zealand children experience changes in “dads”. We will explore the diversity of individuals who are father figures to contemporary New Zealand children with a focus on their work, parent–child relationship and how engaged dads are with their Growing Up in New Zealand child. Our aim is to determine how current and future policy can be developed to enhance the role that modern “dads” can play to contribute positively to children’s early development.

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  • Loop closure and kinase selectivity in lung cancer

    Yosaatmadja, Yuliana; Squire, Christopher (2016-07-17)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Somatic mutations in tyrosine kinase receptors that causes aberrant signalling have been implicated in the development of lung cancer. Two such receptors, EGFR and FGFR kinases are directly involved in many cases of aggressive metastasis and drug resistance. The FGFR kinase family consists of four highly conserved receptor proteins (FGFR1 – FGFR4). FGFR pathways are the main cause of resistance to chemotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer patients, and 22% of them show over-expression of FGFR1. There are a number of small molecules in phase III clinical trials that target not only FGFR but also other kinases. A wide range of EGFR mutations are linked to lung cancer development in never-smokers or former smokers. The two most common mutations are exon 19 deletions and the point mutation L858R in exon 21. Many patients harbouring L858R acquire a secondary T790M mutation after treatment with gefitinib/erlotinib resulting in drug resistance. In the past few years AstraZeneca have developed drugs that target specific proteins, eg; AZD4547 (FGFR1 selective) and AZD9291 (selectivity for T790M/L858R EGFR). In an effort to design our own novel and selective inhibitors, we solved the structures of AZD4547 and AZD9291 in complex with FGFR and EGFR respectively. In both cases, the phosphate binding loop (P-loop) of the proteins forms an unusual “bent” structure wrapped closely around these inhibitors. We speculate that the ability of these compounds to induce P-loop closure is an important part of their respective selectivity mechanisms.

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