231 results for Conference poster

  • What is known about the experience of CPAP for OSA from the users’ perspective? A systematic integrative literature review

    Ward, Kim; Gott, M (2013-10-29)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Introduction: The estimated economic, social and personal cost of untreated obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is high. Night time continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is a recommended, cost effective and popular treatment. The predicted global increase in obesity will lead to increasing prevalence of OSA. Exploring management of CPAP from the user perspective is crucial to successful administration of this therapy. The objective was synthesis of the international evidence base regarding users’ experience of night time continuous positive airway pressure therapy for obstructive sleep apnoea. Materials and methods: A systematic integrative literature review was conducted and quality assessment criteria applied. Results: From 538 identified papers, 22 met inclusion criteria. Thematic analysis identified four themes: (1) evidence regarding experience of CPAP and issues of research design; (2) CPAP influenced by users’ views and beliefs; (3) CPAP investigated using a language of difficulty; and (4) spouse and family impact on CPAP use. Overall, research relating to user experience of CPAP is limited. Understanding is incomplete because of problems of study design, for example the use of pre-determined checklists and survey questions. The problem oriented terminology adopted by most studies is also likely to set up the expectation that users will encounter difficulties with CPAP. There is evidence that personality and attitude impact expectations about CPAP prior to and during use, whilst engagement of spouse, family and colleagues also influence experience. Conclusion: This comprehensive integrative review identified limited evidence about experiencing CPAP from the users’ perspective. Current research is constrained by researchers’ concern with non-compliance. Typically experiences of CPAP are not defined by the user, but from an ‘expert’ healthcare perspective, using language that defines CPAP as problematic. Family and social support is a significant, but underexplored, element of experiencing CPAP and warrants further investigation. Research that more comprehensively involves CPAP users is required to determine how patients manage this therapy successfully.

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  • What influences the association between previous and future crashes among cyclists.

    Tin Tin, Sandar; Woodward, Alistair; Ameratunga, Shanthi (2014-10-09)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Pharmacy students: Personality Types, Professionalism and Decision Making

    Jensen, Maree; Ram, Sanyogita; Dhana, A; Ali, R; Goh, S; Sherif, B; Kwon, S; Elsedfy, Y; Russell, Bruce (2014-06-02)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Facebook© use has become increasingly popular for pharmacy students. Recent debate about the ethical and professional principles pharmacy students possess when social networking online prompted this study. We aimed to identify links between personality types within the University of Auckland (UoA) pharmacy cohort, their activity on Facebook©, and their professional decision making skills.

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  • Comparison and refinement of hip joint centre prediction methods on a large contemporary population

    Zhang, Ju; Hislop-Jambrich, J; Besier, T (2014)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The location of the hip joint centre (HJC) is critical for accurate lower limb kinematics. A number of methods allow the HJC to be predicted from the locations of bony pelvic landmarks. However, widely used predictions methods are often developed on small populations, or have inappropriate parameters when considering different populations. We compare the accuracy of prediction methods by Tylkowski[1], Bell[2], and Seidel[3], and update their parameters using a large urban population. 3-D models of the pelvis were automatically segmented from 159 (86 male, 73 female) post-mortem CT scans collected at the Victorian Insitute of Forensic Medicine. The dataset reflects a contemporary western urban adult population from the state of Victoria, Australia. Bony landmarks (ASIS, PSIS, symphysis pubis) were defined on an atlas model and propagated to correspondent positions on each subject-specific model. The three published methods above were used to predict HJC locations first using their published parameters, then using parameters fitted to the current dataset. Ground truth HJC locations were calculated as the centre of a sphere fitted to the acetabular regions of each model. Using published parameters, mean errors in millimetres for the Tylkowski, Bell, and Seidel methods were, respectively, 23 (4.9), 26 (4.1), and 18 (3.9). After fitting parameters to the current dataset, corresponding mean errors were 13 (5.5), 7.3(4.0), and 5.7 (3.3). Published parameter errors were similar to published errors for the Tylkowski and Bell methods, and more than twice that published for the Seidel method. After fitting parameters, errors for all methods were significantly lower than those previously published. These results highlight the need to validate and recalibrate joint centre prediction methods on large and population-specific datasets.

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  • The STn-SNc hyperdirect pathway modulates dopaminergic neuron activity by inhibiting GABAergic inputs from the SNr via endocannabinoids

    Freestone, Peter; Wu, XH; de Guzman, G; Lipski, Janusz (2014-07-05)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The hyperdirect pathway of the basal ganglia circuitry terminates with a glutamatergic projection from the Subthalamic Nucleus (STN) to the Substantia Nigra pars compacta (SNc). We recently showed that glutamate released in the SNc drives endocannabinoid production in dopaminergic neurons, which in turn inhibits GABAergic transmission in that region. The present study investigated the potential role of STN glutamatergic projections of the hyperdirect pathway in this novel endocannabinoid modulatory mechanism. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were made from SNc dopaminergic neurons in horizontal brain slices (rat) containing STN, SNc and Substantia Nigra pars reticulata (SNr) regions. Either electrical (bi-polar electrode) or pharmacological (local carbachol application) stimulation of the STN was performed to evoke selective glutamate release from terminals in the SNc. GABAergic inputs to the SNc from the SNr were electrically stimulated to evoke inhibitory post-synaptic currents (eIPSCs). Single-pulse electrical stimulation of the STN caused transient (< 1 sec) attenuation of GABAergic eIPSCs amplitudes recorded from dopaminergic neurons (to 73% of control). The eIPSC attenuation was prevented by block of either cannabinoid CB1 receptors with rimonabant (3 µM) or metabotropic glutamate mGluR1 receptors with CPCCOEt (100 µM). Pharmacological activation of STN neurons by rapid local perfusion of muscarinic agonist carbachol (100 µM, 10 s) caused a similar attenuation of eIPSC amplitude. These findings show that glutamate release from STN terminals in the SNc modulates GABAergic transmission through endocannabinoid signalling – a previously undescribed function of the hyperdirect pathway.

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  • Household Characteristics of Children Under Two Years Admitted with Lower Respiratory Infection in South Auckland

    Vogel, A; Trenholme, A; Lennon, Diana; McBride, C; Stewart, Joanna; Best, Emma; Mason, H; Siatu'u, Teuila (2011-04-02)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Collaborative Problem Solving for Do-ers and Teachers of Mathematics

    Sheryn, Sarah; Frankcom, G; Ledger, G (2014-11-27)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    This study sought to explore and analyse the phenomenon of maths anxiety within a real-life context, and to identify if levels of maths anxiety can be reduced through participation in a reciprocal teaching process. This poster presents a small element of the larger study, which investigated how to reduce maths anxiety in teacher candidates. Maths anxiety is a well-researched phenomenon that is known to impede the successful mathematics teaching and learning experiences of some teacher candidates. The maths anxiety these students bring to their mathematics education courses results in poor quality mathematics teaching (Biddulph 1999; Frankcom 2006; Sloan 2010). Mathematics education lecturers have become increasingly aware of how some students become visibly anxious when they walk into the mathematics classroom, and/or are asked to collaborate to solve mathematical problems. These observations are supported by the level of maths anxiety reported by these students. The model developed for this study was informed by the work of Palinscar and Brown (1984) and complemented by problem-solving models from Mullis, et al. (2008), Reilly, Parsons and Bortolot (2009), and Polya (1945). The Revised Reciprocal Teaching Model (RRTM) was designed is to facilitate teacher candidates’ access to mathematical practices used in schools, and simultaneously develop their personal mathematical knowledge and understanding. Cognisant of the problem solving and peer mentoring literature, researchers provided opportunities for graduates to develop adaptive expertise. While peer mentoring is thoroughly established in literacy education it is under-researched within mathematics education. Reciprocal teaching falls within this area of research and provides a framework for individuals to mutually support each other while learning. The RRTM was developed to promote discourse within mathematical communities in an attempt to reduce maths anxiety. The implementation of the RRTM was through a two-phased structured framework, designed to take place over a university calendar year. The framework began with specific training of peer mentors who in turn worked with assigned mentees. The second phase promoted less reliance on the peer mentors and resulted in the students forming their own peer mentoring groups outside of class time. Results suggest that the model has a positive effect on students’ ability to confidently talk about and solve mathematical problems. This is evidenced by the decrease in maths anxiety levels self-reported by teacher candidates. This research indicates the RRTM has the potential to reduce maths anxiety levels of teacher candidates and produce confident do-ers and teachers of mathematics.

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  • Paternal depression during pregnancy and after childbirth: evidence from Growing Up in New Zealand

    Underwood, Lisa; Atatoa Carr, P; Berry, S; Grant, Cameron; Peterson, Elizabeth; Waldie, Karen; Morton, Susan (2016-07-06)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background: There is little evidence on depression among men whose partners are pregnant or have recently given birth. Methods: An ethnically and socioeconomically diverse sample of 3528 men living in New Zealand completed interviews during their partner's pregnancy and nine months after the birth of their child. Depression symptoms were measured using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) and the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). Rates of depression (defined as EPDS>12 and PHQ-9>9) and associations with a range of paternal and maternal characteristics were explored using logistic regression. Results: Antenatal paternal depression, which affected 2.3% of fathers, was associated with paternal perceived stress (OR=1.4, 95%CI 1.3 to 1.5) and fair to poor paternal health (OR=2, 95%CI 1.1 to 3.5) during their partner's pregnancy. Postnatal paternal depression affected 4.3% of fathers and was associated with paternal perceived stress in pregnancy (OR=1.12, 95%CI 1.1 to 1.2), relationship status at nine months after childbirth (OR=5.6, 95%CI 2 to 15.7), fair to poor paternal health at nine months (OR=3.3, 95%CI 2 to 5.1), employment status at nine months (OR=1.8, 95%CI 1.1 to 3.1) and a past history of depression (OR=2.8, 95%CI 1.7 to 4.7). Conclusions: Expectant fathers are at risk of depression if they feel stressed or are in poor health. In this study, rates of depression were higher during the postpartum period and were associated with adverse social and relationship factors. Identifying who is most at-risk of paternal depression and when will help inform interventions to help men and their families.

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  • Recent experiences in using TOUGH2 for geothermal modelling

    Clearwater, Emily; Yeh, Angus; O'Sullivan, John; Kaya, Eylem; Croucher, Adrian; Cui, T; OSullivan, Michael; Zarrouk, Sadiq; Austria, JJC; Ciriaco, Anthony; Archer, Rosalind; Dempsey, David (2012-04-17)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The geothermal modelling group in Engineering Science (University of Auckland) is involved with several geothermal R&D projects. On the development side we are running models of Ohaaki, Wairakei, Ngawha, Reporoa, Wayang Windu and Lihir. Our experiences in these projects have led on to several parallel research projects. Our model of Wairakei-Tauhara is so large that it also contains the Rotokawa system and the edge of the Ngatamriki system. Trying to understand the large-scale convection process at Wairakei-Tauhara has led on to studies of more generic convection studies and studies of larger areas of the TVZ. It has also led on to deeper models which require equations of state that can handle high pressures and temperatures. We have developed one for pure water but now wish to extend it to include CO2 and NaCl. With larger and larger models the computational demand increases quickly and we are now routinely using TOUGH_MP, the parallel version of TOUGH2. Also with large complex models dealing with input and output is a major task and we have developed a suite of PYTHON scripts (called pyTOUGH) for carrying out several model management tasks. One of the biggest challenges in geothermal modelling is model calibration and we have carried out studies using inverse modelling with iTOUGH and PEST and also Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods (MCMC). We are also carrying out miscellaneous studies of resewrvoir physics several of which involve fluid/rock interaction, for example the effects of cold water injection on permeability and subsidence in geothermal fields.

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  • Investigation into the racemic X-ray structure of the antimicrobial protein snakin-1

    Yeung, Ho; Yosaatmadja, Yuliana; Squire, Christopher; Harris, Paul; Baker, Edward; Brimble, Margaret (2015-10-22)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Co-Prescribing of Medications with Anticholinergic Properties to Those Using Cholinesterase Inhibitors for Dementia

    Garrigan, Katherine; John, N; McGrogan, A; Jones, R; de-Vries, C (2010-08)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background: Medications with anticholinergic (AC) propertieshave adverse effects on cognition and many guidelines recommend avoiding them in older adults. Theoretically they could negate benefits of cholinesterase inhibitor (CI) treatment in patients dementia patients, although there is inadequate evidence to date. Objectives: To determine the frequency of AC medicine use in patients treated with a CI and to assess whether such use is associated with early CI discontinuation. Methods: A retrospective cohort study was carried out using the General Practice Research Database. Subjectswere all patients aged 18+ with a new CI prescription after January 2000. All medicines were classified as to their AC properties according to the Rudolph Anticholinergic Risk Scale. AC medication use in patients prescribed CI was determined as well as CI discontinuation rates in those with and without AC medicines. Cox regression survival analysis with time dependent covariates was carried out to determine risk factors for CI discontinuation. Results: 7523 patients newly prescribed CIs were identified. On average, CIs were prescribed for 536 days; 50% of users had discontinued treatment 383 days after CI initiation;75% had discontinued by day 777. 3556 (47%) patients used CIs and AC medicines concomitantly; 1946 (26%) for over 90 days. Being underweight and frail were associated with a 12–15% higher risk of CI discontinuation. An association was found between concomitant AC use (especially antipsychotics) and discontinuation of CI but no association with the strength of AC action or cumulative exposure. Patients aged 80+ were significantly more likely to discontinue their CI early: HRadj 1.27 (CI951.13–1.43) in 80–84 year olds and 1.72 (CI951.53–1.93) in those aged 85+. Conclusions: Further work is needed to evaluate any association between CI discontinuation and cumulative AC exposure. Very elderly and underweight patients discontinued CIs earlier.

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  • Identification of a novel group of muscular dystrophies, the Anoctaminopathies, caused by recessive mutations in the putative calcium activated chloride channel, ANO5

    Marlow, Gareth; Bolduc, V; Boycott, KM; Saleki, K; Inoue, H; Kroon, J; Itakura, M; Robitaille, Y; Parent, L; Baas, F; Mizuta, K; Kamata, N; Richard, I; Linssen, W; Mahjneh, I; de Visser, M; Brais, B; Bashir, R (2010-03-01)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The Anoctamin (ANO) family consists of 10 proteins several of which have been shown to correspond to the elusive calciumactivated chloride channels (CaCCs). CaCCs are gated by increases in intracellular calcium and they have been linked to several cellular functions including epithelial transport, cell volume regulation, olfactory and photoreceptor transduction, cardiac membrane excitability, and smooth muscle contraction. The only reported human mutations linked with the ANO family are dominant mutations in ANO5, which cause a rare bone fragility disorder gnathodiaphyseal dysplasia (GDD1). Recently we have identified recessive ANO5 mutations in patients with proximal limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD2L) and a distal non-dysferlin Miyoshi myopathy (MMD3). The mutations identified consist of splice site, a single adenine duplication and missense. The duplicated adenine is present in LGMD2L and MMD3. The LGMD2L phenotype is characterized by proximal muscle weakness and prominent asymmetric quadriceps atrophy. The MMD3 phenotype is associated with distal weakness in particular of the calf muscles. The clinical heterogeneity associated with ANO5 mutations is reminiscent of that observed with dysferlin mutations which can cause both a LGMD and distal muscular dystrophy. ANO5 mutations are associated with loss of muscle membrane integrity and defective membrane repair. Our studies suggest that ANO5 is a putative calcium-activated chloride channel which may function with dysferlin in membrane repair. Our study has identified a novel group of muscular dystrophies “the Anoctaminopathies”.

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  • Light Exposure Patterns in Children: A Pilot Study

    Backhouse, Simon; Ng, H; Phillips, John (2010-07-27)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Purpose To examine the light exposure patterns of school aged children in relation to refractive error. Methods School-aged children (13-14 years old, n = 12) were issued with self-contained light meters that recorded the ambient light levels every 10 seconds (HOBO Pendant UA-002-064, Onset Computer Corporation, USA). The ambient light levels were collected every 10 seconds over seven days (one period). Measurements were made in three periods over three consecutive months in winter. Cycloplegic autorefraction and axial length measurements were made at the beginning and end of the three month study. Results Ambient light level recordings indicated that while children spent only a small amount of time outside (10.65 ± 2.52 hours per week, or 5.88 ± 1.39% of the total time; mean ± 95% CI, n = 12) these outdoor periods accounted for a large proportion of their total light exposure (4.72 × 107 ± 1.65 × 107 lux, or 87.95 ± 3.72% of their total light exposure). The subjects were exposed to only 5.72 ± 1.86% of the total available light on average over the measurement period. There was a significant correlation between the amount of time spent indoors (between 10 and 1000 lux) and the cumulative light exposure obtained indoors (R2 = 0.945). There was, however, a poor correlation between the amount of time spent outdoors (>1000 lux) and the cumulative light exposure obtained outdoors (R2 = 0.296). Refractive error was not significantly correlated with cumulative light exposure (R2 < 0.001). There were no significant correlations between the rate of change in light levels and refractive error. Discussion and Conclusions A small amount of time spent outdoors is associated with a large proportion of daily light exposure. While predictable levels of light exposure are obtained indoors, there is a great degree of variability in the amount of light received by going outdoors. Thus, a small amount of extra time spent outdoors can disproportionally affect the total light exposure received per day. Further investigations of the quality (e.g. spectral composition) and quantity (e.g. yearly exposure, differing seasons, etc.) of light received by school-aged children are warranted.

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  • PUKUmahi!: Kia whai te huarahi tika. NETwork! Roadmap for safe travel: Ensuring health benefits flow on to Māori

    Henare, Kimiora; Parker, K; Print, Cristin; Findlay, Michael; Lawrence, Benjamin (2015-11-02)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Neuroendocrine tumours (NET) are complex and variable, making it very difficult for clinicians to determine the best course of treatment. The NETwork project seeks to better understand the epidemiological impact of NETs in New Zealand, and to better characterise the disease to help inform oncologists how to treat it. The estimated incidence rate of patients with NETs in New Zealand is approximately 200 patients per year, however the impact among Māori is not yet known. Māori are disproportionately burdened by cancers of the lungs, stomach, and pancreas, so it is tempting to speculate that NET incidence among Māori could also be high. It is essential that Māori are involved in the study in order to get an accurate indication of the impact of this cancer in New Zealand, what genes are driving the cancers, and how each can be treated. The multi-faceted NETwork project combines epidemiological analysis and deep genome sequencing of retrospective and prospective NET tissues. Under the guidelines set out in Te Ara Tika, the design of this research project is mainstream, but is likely to involve Māori participants and have direct relevance to Māori. Despite being neither Māori-centred nor Kaupapa Māori in our approach, the NETwork team are dedicated to honouring the Treaty of Waitangi principles of partnership, participation, and protection. Mindful of the past transgressions involving the use of tissues and genetic information obtained from indigenous populations here in New Zealand and overseas, the NETwork group are keen not to repeat these errors themselves, nor facilitate the opportunity for others to do so. Following ongoing consultation with Te Mata Ira, Maui Hudson, Dr Helen Wihongi, and Associate Professor Papaarangi Reid, we have established a ‘roadmap for safe travel’ to guide all aspects of the multi-faceted project. The framework has three key principles (kawa) underpinning its Governance structure, and three core cultural protocols (tikanga) to be incorporated into the implementation strategies. Adhering to these kawa and tikanga should facilitate the establishment and maintenance of relationships with key stakeholders; a vital aspect to the project. The roadmap for safe travel is still in its early stages of development, and consultation is ongoing. Nevertheless, the NETwork team have a strong platform from which to further develop their project. Although the presented framework is specific to the NETwork project, it could easily be adjusted and utilised for other clinical and biomedical projects.

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  • Effect of contact lens induced retinal defocus on the thickness of the human choroid

    Chiang, Samuel; Backhouse, S; Phillips, John (2014-04-22)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to describe the amplitude and time-course of choroidal thickness changes induced by imposed hyperopic and myopic retinal defocus and to compare the responses in emmetropic and myopic subjects. METHODS Twelve Asian subjects (6 emmetropes and 6 myopes) aged between 18 and 34 years had OCT images of the choroid taken in both eyes at 5 min intervals while exposed to monocular defocus (random right or left eye) for 60 min; the fellow eye was kept optimally corrected (no defocus). Two different monocular defocus conditions (2 D hyperopic or 2 D myopic defocus) were tested on separate occasions. Thickness changes were measured as absolute changes in microns. RESULTS Prior to applying defocus, mean choroidal thickness in myopic eyes (mean ± SD, 256.30µm ± 41.24µm) was significantly less than in emmetropic eyes (mean ± SD, 423.09µm ± 60.69µm) (p<0.05) in 60 minutes. No significant difference was found between emmetropes and myopes in changes of choroidal thickness with the two types of defocus. CONCLUSIONS Small but significant choroidal thickness changes occurred when human eyes were exposed to both myopic and hyperopic monocular defocus. In each case these changes acted to move the retina towards the altered image plane, so as to reduce the degree of defocus. In this small sample we could detect no difference in responses of myopic eyes compared to emmetropic eyes.

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  • The role of conspicuity in bicycle crashes involving a motor vehicle

    Tin Tin, Sandar; Woodward, Alistair; Ameratunga, Shanthi (2014-10-30)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Clinical ICT Tools: Are we able to measure their effectiveness? A Case Study

    Ewens, Andrew; Orr, M; Starr Jr, RG (2014-09-10)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Bridging the Computational Modelling and EHR standards using openEHR and Semantic Web Technology

    Atalag, Koray; Zivaljevic, Aleksandar; Cooling, Michael; Nickerson, David (2015-10-12)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Linking clinical data to computational physiology will enable real-world model validation as well as the possibility of personalised and population level predictive decision support tools. Electronic health records (EHR) embody quantifiable manifestations of genomic and environmental aspects that impact on biological systems when clinical data are structured. However data quality and semantic interoperability remains a major challenge in the world of EHRs. In the computational physiology domain recent attempts to enable semantic interoperability heavily rely on Semantic Web technologies and utilise ontology-based annotations (e.g. RICORDO) but a wealth of useful information and knowledge sits in EHRs where Semantic Web technologies have very limited use. openEHR provides a set of an open engineering specifications that provides a canonical health record architecture and open source tooling to support data collection and integration. Core openEHR specifications have also been adopted by ISO and CEN making it a full international standard which underpins many national programs and has multi-vendor implementations worldwide. Our work describes how to use openEHR to normalise, annotate and link clinical data with biophysical models by using openEHR Archetypes as semantic pointers to underlying clinical concepts in EHR.

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  • Palliative Care Experience, Education and Education Needs of Aged Residential Care Clinical Staff

    Frey, RA; Gott, M; Boyd, M; Robinson, J (2013)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Can we minimize androgen deprivation therapy-related quality of life effects in Māori & Pacific prostate cancer survivors using a genetic stratification?

    Karunasinghe, N; Zhu, Y; Han, Dug; Lange, K; Wang, A; Zhu, Shuotun; Masters, J; Goudie, M; Keogh, J; Benjamin, B; Holmes, M; Ferguson, Lynnette (2015-11-15)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    BACKGROUND: Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is an effective palliation treatment for men with advanced prostate cancer (PC). This is a common treatment received by the majority of PC survivors among New Zealand (NZ) Maori men due to their late presentation of the disease. However, ADT have well documented side effects that could alter the patient’s quality of life (QoL). ADT involves suppression of androgens produced either by the testes or the adrenal gland or both. Adrenal androgen production involves conversion of androstenedione to testosterone by the aldo-keto reductase 1C3 (AKR1C3) enzyme. We have previously reported that the AKR1C3 rs12529 G allele is associated with a lower prostate specific antigen (PSA) level, which is a downstream product of androgens binding to the androgen receptor. The AKR1C3 rs12529 G allele frequency is 14.2% higher among Māori, Pacific and East Asian men compared to Caucasians in our study cohort. Therefore, the current assessment is to evaluate whether genetic stratification with the AKR1C3 rs12529 polymorphism could support decision making on ADT to minimize QoL effects. METHODS: A patient cohort with confirmed clinical diagnoses of PC was recruited with written consent from 2006-2014 to Urology studies carried out at the Auckland Cancer Society Research Centre, University of Auckland, NZ. Recruitment was carried out at hospitals managed under three District Health Boards of Auckland, and private Urology clinics from Waikato District, in NZ. From May 2013, patients were invited to complete a questionnaire that contained options for selecting PC treatment type/s received and a QoL survey. The primary outcomes were the percentage scores under each QoL subscale assessed using the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer quality of life questionnaires (EORTC QLQ-C30 and PR25). Genotyping of these men for the AKR1C3 rs12529 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was carried out using the Sequenom MassArray and iPlex system or the Applied Biosystem’s Taqman SNP genotyping procedure. Age at diagnosis, Gleason score and alcohol consumption were confounding variables between ADT and no ADT groups, and were corrected for subsequent analysis. Analysis of QoL scores were carried out against ADT duration or in association with the AKR1C3 rs12529 SNP using the Generalised Linear Model. P-values <0.02]. This increase among the rs12529 GG genotype (9.7) is therefore, equivalent to 59% of the mean hormone treatment-related symptom score of 16.5 (SD16.6) recorded in this study. INTERPRETATION: As 85.3% ADT recipients have used AA the current study is best interpreted as QoL effects of AAs. This study suggests a possibility for those stratified with the AKR1C3 rs12529 G allele to receive intermittent AA treatment to minimize QoL effects. If larger prospective studies can confirm these findings, PC survivors particularly those of Maori and Pacific ethnic groups may greatly benefit through optimal ADT options not only for their survival benefits, but also to better maintain their QoL.

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