231 results for Conference poster

  • 'Yes we can!': The emerging contribution of social work leadership to clinical governance and quality improvement in district health board mental health services

    McNabb, D; Webster, Michael (2009)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The Implementation of Cooperative Learning in New Zealand Physical Education.

    Dyson, Benedict; Ovens, Alan; Smith, Wayne (2009-09-24)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Mitochondrial Respiration in Skeletal Muscle of Obese Women Prior To Bariatric Surgery and Following Six Months of Weight Loss

    MacDonald, J; McGill, Anne-Thea; Hickey, A; Plank, L; McLeod, B; Falk, S; Wiessing, K; Beban, G; Chan, YK; Xin, Liping; Cooper, GJS; Poppitt, SD (2010-07-12)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Coupled mechanics and airflow of a human lung

    Hedges, KL; Hunter, PJ; Tawhai, MH (2006)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    To study the ventilation distribution within a human lung a model has been produced that couples soft tissue mechanics and a simplified airflow solution.

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  • Use of Accelerated Laboratory Evaluation by Extended Nurse Prescribers: A tool to improve practice?

    Cameron, Marie (2007-11-08)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Bacground – Because of the link between inappropriate antibiotic prescribing and antibiotic resistance, several strategies have been implemented to decrease inappropriate prescribing and improve prescribing practices. As 80% of antibiotic prescribing takes place in primary care, this area has often been the focus of these attempts. An example of such a strategy is the Accelerated Bacteriological Laboratory Evaluation (ABLE) service in Grampian, which provides an overnight microbiology results service. Aim - To describe the knowledge and use of the Accelerated Bacteriological Laboratory Evaluation (ABLE) service by Extended Nurse Prescribers in Grampian (UK). Methodology – Quantitative - Anonymous, self-completed, postal questionnaire of all regional Extended Nurse Prescribers, informed by a preliminary content-setting focus group. Analysis – Descriptive statistics (thematic analysis of focus group). Key Findings – Response rate was 74% (35/47) and 57% (20) of respondents were practice nurses. Eighty nine percent (31) of respondents knew about the ABLE service, and 88% (30) had used it, with 73% (22) using it often. Over half of respondents (55%) stated that they had insufficient information to allow them to make best use of the service. The main barrier to ABLE use was difficulty accessing results (50%/6). The main motivator for ABLE use was the desire to prescribe the correct antibiotic (71%/17). Conclusions – Although the majority of respondents were aware of the ABLE service and have used it, more information at more regular intervals is needed to encourage maximal use. Respondents were more likely to use the service for some conditions than others. Inclusion of information about ABLE in the Extended Nurse Prescribing course followed by regular postal and/or electronic reminders/updates would be preferred. These changes and the expansion of accelerated laboratory evaluation nationwide may help to reduce and improve prescribing practices.

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  • Pneumococcal Vaccine Decreases Hospitalised Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Children <Two Years In An Area Of High Respiratory Disease Burden

    Trenholme, A; Lennon, Diana; Best, Emma; Stewart, Joanna; Mcbride, C; Byrnes, Catherine; Walker, W; Percival, T; Mason, H; Vogel, A (2011-11-16)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Space-Time Multi-Resolution Banded Graph-Cut for Fast Segmentation. (Conference Poster)

    Vaudrey, Tobi; Gruber, Daniel; Wedel, Andreas; Klappstein, Jens (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Conference Details: 30th Annual Symposium of the German Association for Pattern Recognition DAGM Munich, Germany, June 2008. http://www.dagm2008.org/ Applying real-time segmentation is a major issue when processing every frame of image sequences. In this paper, we propose a modi cation of the well known graph-cut algorithm to improve speed for discrete segmentation. Our algorithm yields real-time segmentation, using graph-cut, by performing a single cut on an image with regions of di erent resolutions, combining space-time pyramids and narrow bands. This is especially suitable for image sequences, as segment borders in one image are re ned in the next image. The fast computation time allows one to use information contained in every image frame of an input image stream at 20 Hz, on a standard PC. The algorithm is applied to traf- c scenes, using a monocular camera installed in a moving vehicle. Our results show the segmentation of moving objects with similar results to standard graph-cut, but with improved speed.

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  • Goal: Real-Time Segmentation via Graph Cut Goal: Real-Time Segmentation via Graph Cut

    Vaudrey, Tobi; Wedel, Andreas; Rabe, Clemens; Klappstein, Jens; Klette, Reinhard (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Conference Details: 2008 23rd International Conference Image and Vision Computing New Zealand. IVCNZ 08. Lincoln University, Christchurch, 26-28 November 2008. http://www.lvl.co.nz/ivcnz2008/ The detection of moving objects is a crucial part of driver assistance systems. This paper tackles this issue using computer vision. Two approaches are investigated, monocular and stereoscopic. The base principals and implementational issues are discussed and detailed, high- lighting areas of concern. In both cases, the detection is based on motion analysis of individually tracked image points (optical ow). The monoc- ular approach relies solely on the optical ow, where as the stereoscopic approach also takes stereo depth information into account. In both ap- proaches the motion analysis provides a motion metric which corresponds to the likelihood that the tracked point is moving. Based on this metric the points are segmented into objects by employing the globally op- timal graph cut algorithm. These approaches are then compared and contrasted using real-world vehicle image sequences.

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  • Benefits of speech & language therapy for hearing impaired children

    Fairgray, Liz; Purdy, Suzanne (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Conference details: Reflecting Connections 2008, the second conference jointly hosted by the New Zealand Speech-Language Therapists Association and Speech Pathology Australia. Held at the SKYCITY Convention Centre in Auckland, New Zealand, from the 25th to the 29th of May, 2008. http://www.reflectingconnections.co.nz/ Although the need for speech and language therapy is widely recognized for children who are hearing impaired, there is little research evidence for improved outcomes after specific speech and language therapy interventions. With improvements in hearing aid and cochlear implant technology, and consequently improved access to the speech signal, there has been greater emphasis on listening-based therapies. The most widely used therapy is referred to as “auditory-verbal therapy” (AVT). This approach is endorsed by the Alexander Graham Bell Association, but there is paucity of research evidence for AVT effectiveness (Rhoades, 1982; Goldberg & Flexer, 1993; Wray et al., 1997; Rhoades & Chisholm, 2000). Previous studies have focused on psychosocial and educational outcomes of AVT, rather than measuring specific speech and language outcomes. The current study investigates speech and language, speech perception in noise and reading abilities before and after a 6-month period of weekly AVT with an experienced Certified Auditory-Verbal and Speech-language Therapist. Participants are eight children aged 5 to 17 years with moderate-profound sensorineural hearing loss using cochlear implants (CI) and/or hearing aids.

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  • "But what about the theory?" Designing a social work curriculum around practice learning and reflection

    Adamson, Carole; Bellinger, A (2010-06-10)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Curriculum design in an academic context operates within a site of tension characterised by the need

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  • Learning styles and e-learning: Delivering knowledge and skills for health, human service and social work managers

    Webster, Michael (2009-03-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Orbscan And Pentacam Analysis Of The Cornea In Marfan And Suspected Marfan Syndrome.

    Vincent, Andrea; Ikink, W; Al-Taie, R (2011-05-02)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Body composition and Metabolic changes after Sequential VLED and Bariatric surgery in .

    McGill, Anne-Thea; Chan, YK; Plank, L; McLeod, B; Beban, G; Falk, S; Wiessing, K; Poppitt, SD; Cooper, GJS (2010-07-12)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    3. Anne-Thea McGill¹,Yih-Kai Chan, Lindsay Plank, Briar McLeod, Grant Beban, Sofie Falk, Katy Wiessing, Sally D Poppitt, Garth JS Cooper. Body composition and Metabolic changes after Sequential VLED and Bariatric surgery in women. T2:PO.33. Obesity Reviews, Volume 11, Issue 1, Pages iii-iv, 1-502, July 2010 Special Issue Abstracts of the 11th International Congress on Obesity, 11-15 July 2010, Stockholm, Sweden

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  • Engaging citizenship; formations of professionalism in social development practice - Doctoral Study

    Harington, Philip (2009-02-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    As an occupational identity emerges, how are critical elements of professionalism resolved in practice?

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  • Stream Restoration: Getting the microbial ecology right.

    Lewis, Gillian; Lear, Gavin; Turner, Susan; Boothroyd, Ian; Stott, Rebecca; Roberts, Kelly; Ancion, Pierre; Dopheide, Andrew; Washington, Vidya; Knight, Duane; Smith, Joanna (2008-08-17)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    A comprehensive program to re-establish the structure and function of an ecosystem, including its natural diversity and aquatic habitats.

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  • Fostering the exchange of geoscience resources for knowledge exploration and discovery

    Whitehead, Brandon; Gahegan, Mark; Everett, M; Hills, S; Brodaric, B (2010-11-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Geoscience data capture is expensive. In order to extract maximum value, the data need to be consistently described, easily found, and then shared among those who need it. There has been recent momentum in the geoscience community to develop a common descriptive framework which facilitates data sharing. While storage and transfer standards are vital, they lack a descriptive element which standarizes the meaning of their contents. Metadata capture is appropriate for data stores, but often the terminology carries different meanings as domains become more specialised. For example, the term “migration” to a petroleum geochemist refers to the movement of hydrocarbons in geologic time, yet to a seismologist describes an imaging process. Furthermore, concepts associated with a term may change through time or as contextual factors in a discussion are modified. How, therefore, can the concepts evoked from geoscience resource terminology be defined and aligned to represent this multi-scaled orthogonal variability? Here we show how a community knowledge acquisition exercise was orchestrated to discuss fundamental concepts and their meanings as interpreted by leaders in basin characterization. The result of this exercise is a formal description of many of the features and processes associated with sedimentary basins, i.e. a basin ontology. This ontology allows the use of semantic connections between concepts as a backbone for search and discovery of research artifacts in large data stores.

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  • At your service: An interactive, flexible web-service for translating classification systems and taxonomies

    Whitehead, Brandon; Banchuen, Tawan; Gahegan, Mark; Smart, William; Masoud-Ansari, S (2010-11-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Geoscientists have developed and applied classification systems and taxonomies in an effort to enhance and share their understanding of complex geoscience information. However, the classification systems and taxonomies used throughout the geosciences for land cover and land use, soils, geology are neither static nor universal; the classes that we use to represent the Earth vary considerably with time and from place to place. As a general example, think of a geologic map. There are instances when mapped data contains desirable categories, but the granularity of those categories is not suitable. There are also instances where two or more maps (or data sets) lack the desired categories, or the categories across maps are semantically incompatible. This is to be expected, given that: (i) new science, social and economic agendas change what we may wish to differentiate when we look at a map and (ii) new technologies make differentiation of previously inseperable classes more reliable, thus viable. This paper describes ongoing work to create a web-based semantic translation service that allows users to: (i) experiment with mappings between classification systems and taxonomies; (ii) visualize translation maps using a given mapping; and (iii) persist their translation maps, and share them with others. Semantic equivalence and similarity are supported via underlying ontologies, which also facilitate the merging and re-grouping of classes.

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  • Using stream biofilm microbial communities as indicators of freshwater ecosystem health

    Lewis, Gillian; Ancion, PY; Lear, G; Roberts, K; Washington, V (2010-08-23)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Stream biofilms are a complex aggregation of microorganisms embedded in a polymer matrix and cover almost every surface in freshwater environments. Because of their sedentary way of life, microorganisms associated with biofilms are affected by past and present environmental conditions and therefore constitute a potential integrative indicator of stream health. A wide range of experiments was conducted in both flow chamber microcosms and natural stream environments to investigate the main drivers of microbial community structure and composition and evaluate the potential use of biofilms as a bio-indicator of freshwater ecosystem health. Using community fingerprinting techniques such as terminal-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism and Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis as well as 16S rRNA gene clone libraries we investigated variations occurring in biofilm bacterial and ciliate protozoan communities. Initial experiments conducted in flow chamber microcosms showed that significant differences in microbial community structure could be detected within only a few days of exposure to common water contaminants and remained detectable weeks after transfer to uncontaminated water. Further research investigating biofilm of more than 60 stream sites variously impacted by urbanization revealed a strong separation between rural and urban streams and confirmed the potential use of stream biofilm as a bio-indicator of stream health. Environmental monitoring techniques developed in this project were then successfully tested to investigate the efficacy of an enclosed stormwater treatment system, where traditional biological indicators such as macro-benthic invertebrates were not available. We are now extending our research to 300 different streams in order to define a general Bacterial Community Index characterising stream ecosystem health based on the structure of biofilm bacterial communities.

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  • Progress Testing: Two Countries Divided by a Common Language

    O'Connor, Barbara; Lillis, Steven; Weston, Kimberley; Freeman, A; Bagg, Warwick (2014)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • A Variant of Adaptive Mean Shift-Based Clustering

    Li, Fajie; Klette, Reinhard (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Conference Details: ICONIP 2008 - 15th International Conference on Neural Information. Processing of the Asia-Pacific Neural Network Assembly November 25-28, 2008, Auckland, New Zealand We are interested in clustering sets of highly overlapping clusters. For example, given is an observed set of stars (considered to be a set of points); how to find (recover) clusters which are the contributing galaxies of the observed union of those clusters? Below we propose a modification of an adaptive mean shift-based clustering algorithm (called Algorithm 1) proposed in 2003 by B. Geogescu, I. Shimsoni and P. Meer

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