231 results for Conference poster

  • Diabetes Management by Primary Health Care Nurses in Auckland, New Zealand

    Daly, Barbara; Arroll, B; Sheridan, N; Kenealy, T; Scragg, R (2011-11-04)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Methods PHC nurses in Auckland (a 26% random sample) were asked to complete postal and telephone questionnaires (86% response rate), on education, experience, knowledge and diabetes management practice, and to log their care given to diabetes patients on a randomly selected day (n=265). Results Responses were received from 287 PHC nurses (86% response rate) comprising 210 practice nurses (PN), 49 district nurses (DN) and 28 specialist nurses (SNs). Most nurses (96%) were able to identify excess body weight as a major risk factor for type 2 diabetes and elevated blood glucose levels (BGLs) or glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) (86%) for diabetes-related complications. In contrast, CV risk factors were less well identified, particularly smoking, although more by SNs (43%) than PNs (14%) and DNs (12%, p=0.0005). CV complications, especially stroke, were less well known than microvascular complications, and by significantly fewer PNs (13%) and DNs (8%) than SNs (36%, p=0.002). Stronger associations were found between nurse’s knowledge of elevated HbA1c as a risk factor for diabetes-related complications and management activities related to BGLs and medication, compared with knowledge of CV risk factors, which was not associated with assessment of blood pressure or knowledge of patient’s total cholesterol or smoking status. The median number of patients consulted on the randomly selected day was one by 38% of PNs, two by 47% of DNs and 4-5 by 57% of SNs. Overall, PNs consulted almost 60% of the patients sampled, while patients consulted by DNs were older and more likely to be European New Zealanders, tobacco uses and have diabetes-related complications and co-morbidities, while SNs consulted by Maori and Pacific patients. Conclusion: There is a need for PHC nurses to increase their knowledge of CV risk factors with more effective management required and particularly of smoking.

    View record details
  • Factors Influencing the Aroma Stability of New Zealand Sauvignon blanc

    Herbst, M; Nicolau, Laura; Kilmartin, Paul (2009-08)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    View record details
  • Design of a water soluble amethyrin macrocycle

    Albrett, Amelia; Brothers, Penelope; Aguilar, A; Lee, JT; Sessler, JL (2006-07)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    This JPP issue contains all abstracts accepted for presentation at the Fourth International Conference of Porphyrins and Phthalocyanines (ICPP-4) which was held in Rome, Italy, July 2-7, 2006 and coorganized by Drs Roberto Paolesse and Pietro Tagliatesta from the University of Rome “Tor Vergata”. The printed book of abstracts was given to all ICPP-4 attendees, being a necessary tool to follow the rich scientific program of the meeting, and should also prove useful to those readers of JPP who were not able to attend the biennial scientific meeting of the Society of Porphyrins and Phthalocyanines (SPP).

    View record details
  • Operational Decision Making for Aluminium Smelters

    Gao, Yashuang; Taylor, Mark; Chen, JJJ; Hautus, Michael (2008-11-26)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Many computer systems incorporating artificial intelligence have been introduced for use in industry to assist in making decisions and controlling processes. However, decision making in a complex industrial plant, such as an aluminium smelter, involves psychologically related factors such as intuitive reasonings, operator response characteristics, perception of risk, and implication of rewards. While a significant body of work does exist on decision science, research concerning human interaction with process control systems is still at the development stage. The work reported here aims to meet the needs of the process industry by incorporating human factors and decision making strategies into computer programs such as a supervisory control system for aluminium smelters. A case study on the control of the level of the liquid electrolyte was carried out to firstly facilitate an understanding of the variables, including human factors, on process control. It was found that the availability of crushed solidified electrolyte material had a significant impact on the level of the liquid electrolyte, while the implementation of a supervisory control system had a certain impact, management and leadership styles also had a significant influence.

    View record details
  • Context and relationship: defining resilience in health social workers

    Adamson, Carole; Beddoe, Elizabeth; Huggard, Peter (2011-11-05)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    A qualitative study of social workers in physical and mental health asked experienced social workers who self-defined as resilient to define the concept and to explore the elements of resiliency within their practice. Initial definition of resilience as a personal characteristic was developed into a strongly contextual and relational construct, the binding feature of which was self-awareness and the capacity to reflect. A strong feature of the social workers’ understanding of resilience was their focus on relationship with colleagues and the quality of professional social work practice with service users. Further reflexive and structural elements in their professional lives were identified, highlighting that resilience within health social workers is in dynamic relationship with the organisational context. A resilience framework derived from current literature and from the research is presented.

    View record details
  • The management of change in social services in Aotearoa New Zealand: An examination of the influence of post 1987 'new public managerialism, on organizational culture

    Webster, Michael (2009-03-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    New public managerialism’ has transformed organizational cultures of public/NGO sectors ‘Government by contract’ inaugurated: Accountability for specified outputs Performance agreements between Ministers and Chief Executives Devolution of accountability required managers to develop leadership skills, strategic thinking, business planning, and performance management systems International Federation of Social Work recognition of management (‘core purpose of social work’) professionally validates the project

    View record details
  • Identifying and Visualizing Surface Detail on Michelangelo's David

    Rugis, John (2007)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    We present the results of new experiments in which we have identified, characterized, and produced visualizations of selected fine surface detail on Michelangelo’s David statue. Starting with available raw scan data [Levoy et al. 2000], we have applied a number of techniques, both developed and refined by us, including the calculation of curvature maps, 2.5D spatial noise filtering, texture projection merging [Rugis 2006], and image processing assisted physical measurement. ....

    View record details
  • Energy and nutrient modelling of human evolution

    McGill, Anne-Thea; Wake, G; Beedle, Alan (2010-10)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    ENERGY AND NUTRIENT MODELLING OF HUMAN EVOLUTION Background. During evolution, human encephalisation resulted in high energy use by the large brain in proportion to the body. Adaptations to increase energy intake or reduce total body energy to redress this imbalance may have involved 1) highly developed neural appetite pathways including the dopaminergic mesocorticolimbic self -reward system to enhance energy dense food intake 2) an expensive tissue trade off including a short adaptable gut that relies on a higher energy omnivorous diet 3) slow growth and development and thus careful preservation of cellular integrity to reduce oxidative stress and allow longevity 4) inhibition/alteration of energy expensive vitamin and co-factor synthesis and a dependence on the wide variety of food micronutrients. It appears that many such food micronutrients are modulating cellular energy use, and that micronutrient quality must be built into energy requirements. Concurrently, humans were developing technologies such as tool use and fire to further expand food quality and quantity. However, the neural self reward aspect systems pushed technology to favour high and secure energy yields. Animal husbandry and plant crop farming lead to selective breeding for high fat, starch and sugar produce, at the expense of micronutrient variety and volume. Once technology progressed to factory farming, and mechanised and chemical food processing systems, proportions of food micronutrients/macronutrients were markedly altered. Humans are driven to consume addictive energy dense foodstuffs but (unconsciously) neglect to acquire adequate micronutrient volumes. They are forced to attempt to store the energy firstly safely in subcutaneous adipose, then centrally around viscera, and finally in non-adipose cells where glycolipotoxicity occurs. Aims: We plan to start developing new dynamic energy equations, with reference to Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) models for other biological systems. Ultimately, the ‘ideal’ prehistoric fit and healthy, lean hunter-gatherer will be compared with the contemporary sedentary and (metabolically) degenerate, obese ‘westernised-diet’ consuming human. Method: Principles of DEB and mathematical modelling of energy use will be reviewed with respect to human metabolism and different diets.

    View record details
  • The Effect of Glycosylation on the Potency of Pramlintide, An Anti-Diabetic Drug

    Fletcher, Madeleine; Kowalczyk, Renata; Fairbanks, A; Brimble, Margaret; Hay, DL (2013-12-18)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    View record details
  • Characterisation of the Genetic and Hormone controls of Branching in Petunia

    Simons, Joanne; Templeton, K; Plummer, K; Beveridge, C; Snowden, K (2004-09)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    View record details
  • Diagnostic Utility of a Next Generation Sequencing Retinal Panel in a Māori and Polynesian population with Inherited Retinal Disease

    Vincent, Andrea; Coysh, A; van Bysterveldt, K; Oliver, Verity; Black, G (2016-05-03)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    View record details
  • CUTE: CUTting Edge Diamond Optimization

    Downward, Anthony; Zakeri, G (2011)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The Centenary Diamond, weighing 55g, was estimated to be worth $100 million when it was unveiled in 1991. This diamond was cut from a rough-stone weighing 120g; thus when cutting such a stone, it is imperative to orient the stone such that waste is minimized. Our interactive software allows a user to maximize the value of a diamond from a given rough-stone. As the user alters the orientation of the diamond, it solves optimization problems to scale and position the diamond within the rough-stone.

    View record details
  • Impact of PCV7 on antibiotic susceptibiity of nasophayngeal Streptococcus pneumoniae in South Auckland children

    Sekikawa, E; Trenholme, A; Taylor, S; Lennon, Diana; McBride, C; Best, Emma (2011-03-17)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    View record details
  • Effects of Storm water metal contaminats on microbial communities in stream biofilm revealed by Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis (ARISA)

    Ancion, Pierre; Lear, Gavin; Lewis, Gillian (2008-08-17)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Stormwater metal contaminants are known to be a threat to our freshwater environments but little is known about their effects on stream micro-organisms. This project investigates accumulation and release of the most common stormwater metal contaminants (zinc, copper and lead) in stream biofilms and their effects on bacterial populations.

    View record details
  • Molecular investigation of protozoan diversity in stream biofilms

    Dopheide, AJ; Lear, Gavin; Lewis, Gillian (2006-11-21)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    This research aims to test the following hypothesis: that molecular biological methods will allow description of protozoan diversity and ecology in streams.

    View record details
  • Visualizing multiscale models of the nephron

    Nickerson, David; Terkildsen, J; Hamilton, K; Hunter, Peter (2010-04)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    We present the development of a tool which provides users with the ability to visualize and interact with multiscale models of the nephron – from the scale of models of membrane bound proteins, to that of an individual nephron. A 1-D finite element model of the nephron has been created and is used for both visualization and modeling of the tubule transport. Mathematical models of nephron segments (for example, Weinstein et al., Am. J. Physiol. 292:F1164-F1181, 2007 for the proximal tubule) are embedded in the finite element model. At the cellular level these segment models utilize models encoded in CellML (www.cellml.org) to describe cellular transport kinetics. A user interface has been developed which allows the visualization and interaction with the multiscale nephron models and simulation results. The zinc extension to Firefox (http://www.cmiss.org/cmgui/zinc/) is used to provide an interactive 3-D view of the model(s). This model viewer is embedded in a web page which dynamically presents content based on user input. For example, when viewing the whole nephron model the user might be presented with information on the various embedded segment models as they select them in the 3-D model view. Similarly, the user might choose to focus the model viewer on a cellular model in a particular segment in order to view the various membrane transport proteins. Selecting a specific protein might present the user with a full reference description of the mathematical model governing the behavior of that protein (Nickerson et al., Bioinformatics 24:1112-1114, 2008).

    View record details
  • Afferent axonal pathfinding in developing chicken rhomboencephalon

    Kubke, Maria; Wild, JM (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The developing hindbrain of vertebrates i organized in a series of rhombomeres, each giving rise to specifi c nuclei. The role of this segmentation has been extensively studied with respect to the origin of motor nuclei. The development of afferent innervation, however, has received little attention. Afferent axons enter the brainstem prior to the migration of their central targets and must therefore navigate in the absence of target derived information. Since the target nuclei for each afferent component originates within discrete rhombomeric boundaries, it is possible that the same positional information that is used by neuronal progenitors to defi ne their fi nal fate, may be available to afferent axons to direct them through their initial growth. This study was aimed at determining the normal sequence that characterises the growth of afferent axons in the hindbrain within the context of the site of origin and of the organisation of second order sensory neurons within specifi c rhombomere boundaries. Afferent axons were labelled at different embryonic ages using fl uorescent lipophilic dyes. Crystals of DiI and/or DiO were placed on specifi c exposed nerves or nerve branches of fi xed embryos. Embryos were incubated at 30 C for 18 hrs, after which the hindbrains were dissected, cleared in glycerol and analysed as whole-mount preparations with confocal microscopy. Afferent axons formed a series of fascicles that extended longitudinally along the alar plate, beyond the rhombomeric boundaries that give rise to their target nuclei. At early stages, the degree of organization and segregation of afferent axons did not appear to refl ect the adult patterns. Thus, it appears that the appropriate pathfi nding and fi nal segregation of the afferent components involves an initial profuse growth into the hindbrain, and that proper afferent patterning involves axon retraction and may require the initiation of migration if the central targets towards their fi nal position.

    View record details
  • Blood flow redistribution following pulmonary micro-embolism

    Clark, Alys; Burrowes, KS; Tawhai, Merryn (2010)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Occlusion of pulmonary arteries by autologous clot and bead emboli affect pulmonary function by elevating arterial pressures and reducing the number of functional gas exchange units in the lung. The occlusion of multiple arterioles at the acinar level can have a significant impact on pulmonary function. However, the contribution of acinar structure to perfusion distribution and the significance of arteriole occlusion is not well characterized.

    View record details
  • A synthetic study towards aryl 6,6-spiroacetal analogues of rubromycin

    Choi, Peter; Rathwell, DC; Brimble, Margaret (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    View record details
  • Bronchoconstriction and the MBNW: Insights from anatomical lung modelling.

    Mitchell, Jennine; Tawahi MH (2010-11-30)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Bronchoconstriction and the MBNW: Insights from anatomical lung modelling. Jennine Mitchell and Dr Merryn Tawhai Auckland Bioengineering institute The multiple breath nitrogen washout (MBNW) is a global test of lung function that produces two indices Sacin and Scond that are reflective of ventilation heterogeneity arising at the level of acinus and between more spatially disparate regions of the lung respectively. An important application of the MBNW is in the study of asthma. Ventilation defects have been noted to occur in imaging studies of asthma. These regional ventilation defects have not previously been considered in relation to the MBNW indices. Scond is purported to be related to the state of conducting airways however no modelling studies exist which directly link the airway state to Scond. In this work regional ventilation defects have been simulated in an anatomically based human lung model and theoretically linked to the MBNW indices Sacin and Scond. Ventilation is simualted to the level of the acinus in a model in which acinar ventilation is considered independent of ventialtion in other acini. As previously indicated in modelling studies a high degree of constriction is required to produce a ventilation defect. The relationship between the degree of constriction in airways leading to the defect and the Scond index is however highly non-linear and shows a sharp decrease at very high levels of constriction. Ventilation defects potentially cause non-communication of gas trapped in the ventilation defects with the mouth. This may alter the calculation of FRC if nitrogen dilution is used to calculate FRC. As the indices are dependent on the phase III slope for each breath being normalised by FRC this alters MBNW results. The index Scond is not be able to be explained simply in terms of increased time constants due to increased resistance in the main conducting airway tree. The model indicates that the Scond index is more complex than current MBNW theory indicates and cannot be simply explained in terms of a longer time constant due to constriction in the conducting airway tree resulting in increased late emptying of poorly ventilated regions.

    View record details