231 results for Conference poster

  • Factors Influencing the Aroma Stability of New Zealand Sauvignon blanc

    Herbst-Johnstone, Mandy; Kilmartin, PA; Nicolau, L (2009)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Stability of varietal aromas in Marlborough Sauvignon blanc wines

    Herbst, M; Kilmartin, Paul; Nicolau, Laura (2007-07)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Molecular basis for binding and subtype selectivity of 1,4-benzodiazepine antagonist ligands of the cholecystokinin receptor

    Cawston, Erin; Sexton, PM; Miller, LJ (2011-01)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Allosteric intramembranous binding pockets in peptide-binding GPCRs create opportunities to develop novel small molecule drugs with substantial benefit over orthosteric-acting drugs. To gain insights into the molecular determinants of the allosteric binding pocket within cholecystokinin (CCK) receptors, we prepared and characterized a series of receptor constructs in which residues proposed to line this pocket that are distinct in each receptor were reversed (chimeric constructs). Two novel ligands were studied, representing 1,4-benzodiazepine antagonists that differ only in the stereochemistry (S or R) of the 3-position side chain, while exhibiting binding selectivity for either CCK1R or CCK2R, respectively. Radioiodinated 1,4-benzodiazepine ligands were used as tracers in the binding assays. Six mutations within four transmembrane segments of CCK1R and CCK2R were studied. When all six residues were mutated in CCK1R to the corresponding residues in CCK2R, the selectivity of this receptor was completely reversed, yet its peptide-binding selectivity was unaffected. To further investigate which regions may be responsible for this change in selectivity, mutagenesis of the residues within individual transmembrane segments within CCK1R and CCK2R was performed and resulted in minimal impact in binding to the iodinated 1,4-benzodiazepines. Therefore, combining the residue changes within two or three segments were also prepared and studied. This detailed mutational analysis provides important information on the benzodiazepine allosteric binding site present within the CCK receptors and provides insight into ligand-receptor interactions that may be important in selectivity of this allosteric binding pocket within CCK receptors.

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  • In vivo and in vitro assessment of the action of the antitumour benzonaphthyridine derivative SN 28049 on the murine Colon 38

    Chen, Ying; Finlay, GJ; Richardson, E; Baguley, BC (2010-05)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    SN 28049 a new DNA binding benzonaphthyridine derivative targeting the topoisomerase II enzyme is curative against the murine Co38 adenocarcinoma, whereas another agent targeting the same enzyme, etoposide, is relatively ineffective against this tumour.

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  • Variations in Extemporaneous Ophthalmic Practices in New Zealand Hospitals

    Gargiulo, Derryn; Kairuz, Therese (2006-11-09)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    In New Zealand certain dosage forms are not readily available as a result of government policy on the funding of pharmaceuticals. Extemporaneous ophthalmic formulations are required for a variety of patients, and the challenge to demonstrate that such products are prepared in accordance with best practice. Extemporaneous compounding is considered an area of pharmaceutical activity that carries a high risk of error in terms of safety and quality. This can be increased by the number of aseptic manipulations.

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  • High throughput methods for the investigation of the human microbiome

    Lau, Kelvin; Berg, A; Ketley, J; Barer, M (2011-03-09)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Microorganisms can colonise many sites within the human host, including the skin, gastrointestinal tracts, oronasopharyngeal cavity and urogenital tract. Comprehensive studies of the human microbiome often need to encompass a large number of samples as a consequence of the variety of distinct sites that are colonised, and the significant variation in microbiota that can exist between individuals. For large sample sets, the cost of sequencing and the bioinformatics resources required to process sequence data can be prohibitive, and become limiting factors for the depth of the investigation. ....

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  • Safety and efficacy of a superantigen based vaccine carrier in human MHC II-CD4 transgenic mice

    Radcliff, FJ; Munro, GH; Fraser, JD (2008-12-08)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Inhibition of complement by Staphylococcal superantigen-like protein 7 in vitro and in vivo

    Lorenz, Natalie; Fraser, John; Radcliff, F (2010-12-07)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Diversity in Large Classes: The Challenge Of Providing Self Directed Formative Learning

    Harper, Amanda; Brittain, Judith (2007-12-02)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    First year science courses at the University of Auckland face a number of common challenges which impact on course design and learning support for individual students. The large student cohorts (> 1100) entering courses are not only diverse in future program choices but also in their educational backgrounds. Opportunities for formative learning have been developed though the web environment using the university’s “in house” learning management system Cecil, and Bestchoice (an interactive learning portal). http://bestchoice.net.nz (Woodgate and Titheridge 2006). These formative learning activities have been integrated into existing course designs (Gunn & Harper 2006) to support diversity in learning strategies and learning styles while enabling all students to develop a sound body of knowledge essential in the discipline of Science. Teachers across the disciplines of Chemistry and Biological Sciences maintain a professional dialogue about learning developments. There is an overlap of the order of 80% across the Biology and Chemistry cohorts. Where it is appropriate, similar technologies are used. This commonality between courses results in improvements in students’ learning outcomes. This is part of teaching reflective practice which is currently influencing future developments.

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  • The student nurse integrated team model:barriers and benefits

    Aspinall, Cathleen; Baker, H; Vallant, S; Spence, D (2010-11-05)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The student nurse integrated team model:barriers and benefits Intent. The purpose of this research was to evaluate a collaborative project to implement an integrated team model of learning in practice with the clinical placement provider for second year Bachelor of Nursing students from the University of Auckland and Auckland University of Technology. Description. Our clinical partner put forward a proposal to change the model of working with undergraduate student nurses in the clinical environment .The aim was to improve the student’s integration into nursing teams and also strengthen their model of team nursing. The World Health Organisation (WHO 2009) identified that the role individuals play within a team influences team effectiveness and therefore impacts on the quality of patient safety. From a University perspective this involved changing the role of the academic lecturer from working alongside the student to supporting the registered nurses. In their role as mentors, the nurses would assist with the integration of theory into practice and teach clinical skills at the bedside. A perceived benefit would be the emersion of second year student nurses into the ward team. The student nurse integrated team model was devised based on a mentorship concept and piloted in the medical and surgical areas of the public hospital. This study evaluated the model from both the University and the ADHB perspective using a mixed methodology.The University of Auckland surveyed students, university lecturers, charge nurses, staff nurse mentors and clinical nurse educators.The Auckland University of Technology held focus groups with the same participants. It was anticipated that this method would provide hard data for evaluation and qualitative information to explore the experience. The introduction of a new way of working in reality meant a change of role for university and clinical staff. Furthermore, the success of the project as with any change initiative, was dependent on a number of stakeholders. Evaluation Both qualitative and quantitative research methods were used in the evaluation of this new way of working, the process and results will be shared at the conference. Bibliography includes but not limited to the following: Flin, R. Winter, J. Sarac, and C. & Raduma, M. (2009) .Human factors in patient safety: Review of tools and topics. Geneva: World Health Organization.

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  • Energy and nutrient modelling of human evolution

    McGill, Anne-Thea; Wake, G; Beedle, Alan (2010-10)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    ENERGY AND NUTRIENT MODELLING OF HUMAN EVOLUTION Background. During evolution, human encephalisation resulted in high energy use by the large brain in proportion to the body. Adaptations to increase energy intake or reduce total body energy to redress this imbalance may have involved 1) highly developed neural appetite pathways including the dopaminergic mesocorticolimbic self -reward system to enhance energy dense food intake 2) an expensive tissue trade off including a short adaptable gut that relies on a higher energy omnivorous diet 3) slow growth and development and thus careful preservation of cellular integrity to reduce oxidative stress and allow longevity 4) inhibition/alteration of energy expensive vitamin and co-factor synthesis and a dependence on the wide variety of food micronutrients. It appears that many such food micronutrients are modulating cellular energy use, and that micronutrient quality must be built into energy requirements. Concurrently, humans were developing technologies such as tool use and fire to further expand food quality and quantity. However, the neural self reward aspect systems pushed technology to favour high and secure energy yields. Animal husbandry and plant crop farming lead to selective breeding for high fat, starch and sugar produce, at the expense of micronutrient variety and volume. Once technology progressed to factory farming, and mechanised and chemical food processing systems, proportions of food micronutrients/macronutrients were markedly altered. Humans are driven to consume addictive energy dense foodstuffs but (unconsciously) neglect to acquire adequate micronutrient volumes. They are forced to attempt to store the energy firstly safely in subcutaneous adipose, then centrally around viscera, and finally in non-adipose cells where glycolipotoxicity occurs. Aims: We plan to start developing new dynamic energy equations, with reference to Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) models for other biological systems. Ultimately, the ‘ideal’ prehistoric fit and healthy, lean hunter-gatherer will be compared with the contemporary sedentary and (metabolically) degenerate, obese ‘westernised-diet’ consuming human. Method: Principles of DEB and mathematical modelling of energy use will be reviewed with respect to human metabolism and different diets.

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  • Identifying and Visualizing Surface Detail on Michelangelo's David

    Rugis, John (2007)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    We present the results of new experiments in which we have identified, characterized, and produced visualizations of selected fine surface detail on Michelangelo’s David statue. Starting with available raw scan data [Levoy et al. 2000], we have applied a number of techniques, both developed and refined by us, including the calculation of curvature maps, 2.5D spatial noise filtering, texture projection merging [Rugis 2006], and image processing assisted physical measurement. ....

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  • The Effect of Glycosylation on the Potency of Pramlintide, An Anti-Diabetic Drug

    Fletcher, Madeleine; Kowalczyk, Renata; Fairbanks, A; Brimble, Margaret; Hay, DL (2013-12-18)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • CUTE: CUTting Edge Diamond Optimization

    Downward, Anthony; Zakeri, G (2011)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The Centenary Diamond, weighing 55g, was estimated to be worth $100 million when it was unveiled in 1991. This diamond was cut from a rough-stone weighing 120g; thus when cutting such a stone, it is imperative to orient the stone such that waste is minimized. Our interactive software allows a user to maximize the value of a diamond from a given rough-stone. As the user alters the orientation of the diamond, it solves optimization problems to scale and position the diamond within the rough-stone.

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  • Cell proliferative and radioprotective properties of bioactive Salvia sclareoides extracts

    Ruivo, D; Oliveira, Maria; Rauter, AP; Justino, J; Goulart, M (2008-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Are doctoral theses changing over time?

    Brailsford, Ian; Sowden, Elizabeth; Orioli Figueira, Brigida (2016-04-22)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    This poster presents longitudinal data on the length and chapter composition of 800 doctoral theses deposited at the University of Auckland between 2008 and 2015. Over this period, the doctoral statute has been amended to allow for more flexibility in the format of a thesis submitted for examination, such as the inclusion of creative practice and peer-reviewed publications. In addition, the funding mechanisms for doctorates in New Zealand have put a premium on candidates completing in a timely fashion. Given these two contexts we speculated that the length of an average doctoral thesis would be declining over time. One hundred doctoral theses – overwhelmingly PhD theses with a smattering of name doctorates –deposited in the University Library from each calendar year were randomly selected to assess: the number of pages; chapter composition; and inclusion of published papers within the thesis. These data were then correlated against academic faculty to tease out variations across the disciplines. Overall, our findings indicate that the doctoral thesis has remained relatively stable in length and chapter structure.

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  • Te Punga and the Net Generation

    Wilkinson, Elizabeth; Sutton, Megan (2006)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Our existing Voyager catalogue tutorial was text-heavy and decontextualised— detached from student experience, youth culture and the research process. The aim was to create a student-centred tutorial, applying sound learning principles, providing relevant contexts for first year students and using Net Gen modes to convey the information.

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  • Effects of complex milk lipid components on neurodevelopment in vitro

    Lim, JH; Hodgkinson, S; Dragunow, M; Norris, C; Vickers, M (2010-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Quality of Life in Fit Elderly Patients with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) Receiving Oral Fludarabine-Based Regimens As First Line Therapy: Australasian Leukaemia and Lymphoma Group (ALLG) CLL5 Trial

    Suneet, S; Gill, D; Turner, PD; Renwick, WEP; Latimer, M; Mackinlay, N; Berkahn, Leanne; Simpson, DR; Campbell, P; Forsyth, C; Cull, G; Harrup, R; Best, G; Bressel, M; Di Iulio, J; Kuss, BJ; Mulligan, S (2015-12-03)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The development of a whey-based kefir beverage: Physiocochemical, sensory and microbiological characteristics

    Chan, Cheuk; Quek, Siew-Young; Roberton, AM (2007-11-15)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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