231 results for Conference poster

  • What is known about the experience of CPAP for OSA from the users’ perspective? A systematic integrative literature review

    Ward, Kim; Gott, M (2013-10-29)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Introduction: The estimated economic, social and personal cost of untreated obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is high. Night time continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is a recommended, cost effective and popular treatment. The predicted global increase in obesity will lead to increasing prevalence of OSA. Exploring management of CPAP from the user perspective is crucial to successful administration of this therapy. The objective was synthesis of the international evidence base regarding users’ experience of night time continuous positive airway pressure therapy for obstructive sleep apnoea. Materials and methods: A systematic integrative literature review was conducted and quality assessment criteria applied. Results: From 538 identified papers, 22 met inclusion criteria. Thematic analysis identified four themes: (1) evidence regarding experience of CPAP and issues of research design; (2) CPAP influenced by users’ views and beliefs; (3) CPAP investigated using a language of difficulty; and (4) spouse and family impact on CPAP use. Overall, research relating to user experience of CPAP is limited. Understanding is incomplete because of problems of study design, for example the use of pre-determined checklists and survey questions. The problem oriented terminology adopted by most studies is also likely to set up the expectation that users will encounter difficulties with CPAP. There is evidence that personality and attitude impact expectations about CPAP prior to and during use, whilst engagement of spouse, family and colleagues also influence experience. Conclusion: This comprehensive integrative review identified limited evidence about experiencing CPAP from the users’ perspective. Current research is constrained by researchers’ concern with non-compliance. Typically experiences of CPAP are not defined by the user, but from an ‘expert’ healthcare perspective, using language that defines CPAP as problematic. Family and social support is a significant, but underexplored, element of experiencing CPAP and warrants further investigation. Research that more comprehensively involves CPAP users is required to determine how patients manage this therapy successfully.

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  • Palliative Care Experience, Education and Education Needs of Aged Residential Care Clinical Staff

    Frey, RA; Gott, M; Boyd, M; Robinson, J (2013)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Educating for disaster: Determining the core elements of a disaster curriculum for social work in New Zealand

    Adamson, Carole (2012)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    In 2010 and 2011, Aotearoa New Zealand was hit by a number of major disasters involving loss of human life and severe disruption to social, ecological and economic wellbeing. The Pike River mine explosions were closely followed by a sequence of major earthquakes in Christchurch, seismic events that have permanently altered the lives of thousands of people in our third largest city, the closure of the central business district and the effective abandonment of whole residential areas. In early October 2011, the ship, Rena, grounded on a reef off the port of Tauranga and threatened a major oil spill throughout the Bay of Plenty, where local communities with spiritual and cultural connections to the land depend on sea food as well as thrive on tourism. The Council for Social Work Education Aotearoa New Zealand (CSWEANZ), representing all the Schools of Social Work in New Zealand, held a ‘Disaster Curriculum’ day in November 2011, at which social workers and Civil Defence leaders involved in the Christchurch earthquakes, the Rena Disaster, Fiji floods and the Boxing Day tsunami presented their narrative experience of disaster response and recovery. Workshops discussed and identified core elements that participants considered vital to a social work curriculum that would enable social work graduates in a range of community and cultural settings to respond in safe, creative and informed ways. We present our core ideas for a social work disaster curriculum and consider a wide range of educational content based on existing knowledge bases and new content within a disaster framework.

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  • Light Exposure Patterns in Children: A Pilot Study

    Backhouse, Simon; Ng, H; Phillips, John (2010-07-27)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Purpose To examine the light exposure patterns of school aged children in relation to refractive error. Methods School-aged children (13-14 years old, n = 12) were issued with self-contained light meters that recorded the ambient light levels every 10 seconds (HOBO Pendant UA-002-064, Onset Computer Corporation, USA). The ambient light levels were collected every 10 seconds over seven days (one period). Measurements were made in three periods over three consecutive months in winter. Cycloplegic autorefraction and axial length measurements were made at the beginning and end of the three month study. Results Ambient light level recordings indicated that while children spent only a small amount of time outside (10.65 ± 2.52 hours per week, or 5.88 ± 1.39% of the total time; mean ± 95% CI, n = 12) these outdoor periods accounted for a large proportion of their total light exposure (4.72 × 107 ± 1.65 × 107 lux, or 87.95 ± 3.72% of their total light exposure). The subjects were exposed to only 5.72 ± 1.86% of the total available light on average over the measurement period. There was a significant correlation between the amount of time spent indoors (between 10 and 1000 lux) and the cumulative light exposure obtained indoors (R2 = 0.945). There was, however, a poor correlation between the amount of time spent outdoors (>1000 lux) and the cumulative light exposure obtained outdoors (R2 = 0.296). Refractive error was not significantly correlated with cumulative light exposure (R2 < 0.001). There were no significant correlations between the rate of change in light levels and refractive error. Discussion and Conclusions A small amount of time spent outdoors is associated with a large proportion of daily light exposure. While predictable levels of light exposure are obtained indoors, there is a great degree of variability in the amount of light received by going outdoors. Thus, a small amount of extra time spent outdoors can disproportionally affect the total light exposure received per day. Further investigations of the quality (e.g. spectral composition) and quantity (e.g. yearly exposure, differing seasons, etc.) of light received by school-aged children are warranted.

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  • Novel release method proves successful: The gum leaf skeletoniser parasitoid Cotesia urabae establishes in two new locations

    Gresham, BA; Withers, TM; Avila Olesen, Gonzalo; Berndt, LA (2014-08-12)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The Australian braconid wasp Cotesia urabae was first released in New Zealand in 2011, as a biological control agent for the gum leaf skeletoniser Uraba lugens (Lepidoptera: Nolidae). The larvae of this moth predominantly attack Eucalyptus spp. (Class: Symphyomyrtus) and, since its predicted future geographic range is extensive, there is concern it could become a serious pest of eucalypt plantations in New Zealand. Initial releases of C. urabae using adult parasitoids were made in Auckland at three separate sites between January and June 2011. Cotesia urabae established at each site and preliminary monitoring has revealed that the wasps have naturally dispersed to six other sites, ranging up to 6 km from an initial release site. In January 2012, C. urabae were released in Whangarei and Tauranga, trialling a novel method using parasitoid-attacked host larvae, rather than adult parasitoids. This method proved to be successful, with establishment now confirmed in both of these locations, and also provided greater flexibility. The two latest releases were made using the same method in Nelson (October 2013) and Napier (February 2014), but it is not yet known if the parasitoid has successfully established in these locations.

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  • PUKUmahi!: Kia whai te huarahi tika. NETwork! Roadmap for safe travel: Ensuring health benefits flow on to Māori

    Henare, Kimiora; Parker, K; Print, Cristin; Findlay, Michael; Lawrence, Benjamin (2015-11-02)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Neuroendocrine tumours (NET) are complex and variable, making it very difficult for clinicians to determine the best course of treatment. The NETwork project seeks to better understand the epidemiological impact of NETs in New Zealand, and to better characterise the disease to help inform oncologists how to treat it. The estimated incidence rate of patients with NETs in New Zealand is approximately 200 patients per year, however the impact among Māori is not yet known. Māori are disproportionately burdened by cancers of the lungs, stomach, and pancreas, so it is tempting to speculate that NET incidence among Māori could also be high. It is essential that Māori are involved in the study in order to get an accurate indication of the impact of this cancer in New Zealand, what genes are driving the cancers, and how each can be treated. The multi-faceted NETwork project combines epidemiological analysis and deep genome sequencing of retrospective and prospective NET tissues. Under the guidelines set out in Te Ara Tika, the design of this research project is mainstream, but is likely to involve Māori participants and have direct relevance to Māori. Despite being neither Māori-centred nor Kaupapa Māori in our approach, the NETwork team are dedicated to honouring the Treaty of Waitangi principles of partnership, participation, and protection. Mindful of the past transgressions involving the use of tissues and genetic information obtained from indigenous populations here in New Zealand and overseas, the NETwork group are keen not to repeat these errors themselves, nor facilitate the opportunity for others to do so. Following ongoing consultation with Te Mata Ira, Maui Hudson, Dr Helen Wihongi, and Associate Professor Papaarangi Reid, we have established a ‘roadmap for safe travel’ to guide all aspects of the multi-faceted project. The framework has three key principles (kawa) underpinning its Governance structure, and three core cultural protocols (tikanga) to be incorporated into the implementation strategies. Adhering to these kawa and tikanga should facilitate the establishment and maintenance of relationships with key stakeholders; a vital aspect to the project. The roadmap for safe travel is still in its early stages of development, and consultation is ongoing. Nevertheless, the NETwork team have a strong platform from which to further develop their project. Although the presented framework is specific to the NETwork project, it could easily be adjusted and utilised for other clinical and biomedical projects.

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  • The role of conspicuity in bicycle crashes involving a motor vehicle

    Tin Tin, Sandar; Woodward, Alistair; Ameratunga, Shanthi (2014-10-30)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Etiology of increasing incidence of congenital hypothyroidism in New Zealand from 1993 to 2010

    Albert, B; Jefferies, C; Webster, D; Cutfield, W; Gunn, A; Carll, J; Bendikson, K; Derraik, J; Hofman, Paul (2012-06-24)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Effect of contact lens induced retinal defocus on the thickness of the human choroid

    Chiang, Samuel; Backhouse, S; Phillips, John (2014-04-22)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to describe the amplitude and time-course of choroidal thickness changes induced by imposed hyperopic and myopic retinal defocus and to compare the responses in emmetropic and myopic subjects. METHODS Twelve Asian subjects (6 emmetropes and 6 myopes) aged between 18 and 34 years had OCT images of the choroid taken in both eyes at 5 min intervals while exposed to monocular defocus (random right or left eye) for 60 min; the fellow eye was kept optimally corrected (no defocus). Two different monocular defocus conditions (2 D hyperopic or 2 D myopic defocus) were tested on separate occasions. Thickness changes were measured as absolute changes in microns. RESULTS Prior to applying defocus, mean choroidal thickness in myopic eyes (mean ± SD, 256.30µm ± 41.24µm) was significantly less than in emmetropic eyes (mean ± SD, 423.09µm ± 60.69µm) (p<0.05) in 60 minutes. No significant difference was found between emmetropes and myopes in changes of choroidal thickness with the two types of defocus. CONCLUSIONS Small but significant choroidal thickness changes occurred when human eyes were exposed to both myopic and hyperopic monocular defocus. In each case these changes acted to move the retina towards the altered image plane, so as to reduce the degree of defocus. In this small sample we could detect no difference in responses of myopic eyes compared to emmetropic eyes.

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  • Talking Allowed!

    Davies, Maree; Sinclair, A (2011)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Research on the Paideia Method (a method for discussing a topic) was conducted in 20 classrooms across five schools, of varying socioeconomic environments (ages 11-13) in Auckland, New Zealand, in 2010. The researchers sought to further examine the results from their pilot study of the Paideia Seminar, entitled 'Talking Allowed: I like it when the teacher lets us talk without telling us what to say', trialed in 2008 (Sinclair & Davies, 2011). In addition, in order to provide the optimum conditions to prepare the students for the face-to-face seminars, an online component (open source software) was added as an alternative medium to assist students in their preparation. The research questions were: What happens to the Nature of Interaction, and the Complexity of the Discussion when students participate in a Paideia Seminar, and an on-line discussion in preparation for the face-to-face seminar? What is the optimal role of the teacher when participating in a Paideia Seminar and an on-line discussion to increase complexity of discussion?

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  • The Regional Structure of Technical Innovation

    O'Neale, DR; Hendy, SC (2014-06-04)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    There is strong evidence that the productivity per capita of cities and regions increases with population. One likely factor behind this phenomenon is agglomeration; densely populated regions are able to bring together otherwise unlikely combinations of individuals and organisations with diverse, specialised capabilities. But clearly not all possible combinations of capability are equally valuable, nor are they equally likely. In order to investigate patterns in the typical combinations of capabilities, we have used the REGPAT patent database to construct a bipartite network of geographic regions and the patent classes for which those regions display a revealed comparative advantage. By identifying the pairs of patent classes that are most likely to co-occur within regions, we can infer relationships between the classes, giving a new network that maps out the structure of technical innovation. The resulting network has a core-periphery structure with a central group of highly connected technologies surrounded by branches of more specialised combinations. We investigate measures such as the diversity of regional patent portfolios and the ubiquity of patent classes across regions. We find that diversity is positively correlated with regional population, while the average ubiquity of patents in a region’s patent portfolio is negatively correlated. This suggests that more populous regions are able to expand into more specialised and higher value parts of the patent network.

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  • Using network science to explore innovation

    O'Neale, DR; Hendy, SH (2013-06-06)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    We live in a world were scientific and technical advances require increasingly specialised knowledge while drawing expertise from ever more diverse technical areas. In an effort to better understand the relationships between different areas of innovation, and the role of specialisation, diversity and ubiquity in national and regional economies, we have mined several million patent records from the European Patent Office, along with their classification codes, and used them to construct a network of “patent-space”. Patents provide a rich data set when studying innovation. Networks of scientific publications, such as that in [1], formed from inter-journal citations, illustrate the links between different disciplines as new knowledge is created, while networks of countries and the goods they export, such as the “product-space” network in [2], give insight into the economic complexity (or otherwise) and the likely areas of growth for national economies. Using patents allows us to take an intermediate view and investigate the role of science and innovation in economic growth. We take an approach similar to [2], identifying when individual countries or geographic regions have a “revealed comparative advantage” with respect to particular technical areas. We have constructed a proximity network as a base-map for the space of patentable innovation. We find that patent-space is heterogeneous and highly structured, and that the structure depends on the size or “granularity” of the regions that data is aggregated into. By overlaying data for particular regions on the patent-space base map we are able to explore temporal and regional trends – in particular how the innovation systems of different countries has produced quite different areas of specialisation. Figure 1: Patent-space for New Zealand (left) and South Korea (right) - two countries with very different innovation systems. Nodes represent patent classification classes. Nodes are dark when the country has a comparative advantage in that area and faded out otherwise. Nodes are connected if a comparative advantage with respect to one classification tends to occur in conjunction with a connected classification. [1] L. Leydesdorff & I. Rafols, Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology (2008). [2] C. Hidalgo & R. Hausmann, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2009).

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  • Searching for anomalous light curves in massive data sets

    Rattenbury, Nicholas (2014-01-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The photometric surveys currently under way by the MOA and OGLE collaborations have produced and are extending databases of millions of stellar light curves. These databases have allowed investigations into diverse astrophysical fields including variable stars, proper motion studies and Galactic structure. Odd, or otherwise curious events have been discovered in the databases. We consider here one such event and propose methods for discovering more like it in the microlensing databases. A further aim of this initial work is to set out the prospects of the classification scheme for identifying time series that are maximally discordant - i.e. those that do not look like any other time series in the data set, and which therefore, may be of particular interest.

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  • An Architecture for Flexible Problem Solving

    Langley, Patrick; Emery, Miranda; Barley, Michael; Maclellan, C (2013)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The literature on problem solving in both humans and machines has revealed a diverse set of strategies that operate in different manners. In this paper, we review this great variety of techniques and propose a five-stage framework for problem solving that accounts for this variation in terms of differences in strategic knowledge used at each stage. We describe the framework and its implementation in some detail, including its encoding of problems and their solutions, its representation of domain-level and strategy-level knowledge, and its overall operation. We present evidence of the framework’s generality and its ability to support many distinct problem-solving strategies, including one that is novel and interesting. We also report experiments that show the framework’s potential for empirical comparisons of different techniques. We conclude by reviewing other work on flexible approaches to problem solving and considering some directions for future research.

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  • Bridging the Computational Modelling and EHR standards using openEHR and Semantic Web Technology

    Atalag, Koray; Zivaljevic, Aleksandar; Cooling, Michael; Nickerson, David (2015-10-12)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Linking clinical data to computational physiology will enable real-world model validation as well as the possibility of personalised and population level predictive decision support tools. Electronic health records (EHR) embody quantifiable manifestations of genomic and environmental aspects that impact on biological systems when clinical data are structured. However data quality and semantic interoperability remains a major challenge in the world of EHRs. In the computational physiology domain recent attempts to enable semantic interoperability heavily rely on Semantic Web technologies and utilise ontology-based annotations (e.g. RICORDO) but a wealth of useful information and knowledge sits in EHRs where Semantic Web technologies have very limited use. openEHR provides a set of an open engineering specifications that provides a canonical health record architecture and open source tooling to support data collection and integration. Core openEHR specifications have also been adopted by ISO and CEN making it a full international standard which underpins many national programs and has multi-vendor implementations worldwide. Our work describes how to use openEHR to normalise, annotate and link clinical data with biophysical models by using openEHR Archetypes as semantic pointers to underlying clinical concepts in EHR.

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  • Pharmacy students: Personality Types, Professionalism and Decision Making

    Jensen, Maree; Ram, Sanyogita; Dhana, A; Ali, R; Goh, S; Sherif, B; Kwon, S; Elsedfy, Y; Russell, Bruce (2014-06-02)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Facebook© use has become increasingly popular for pharmacy students. Recent debate about the ethical and professional principles pharmacy students possess when social networking online prompted this study. We aimed to identify links between personality types within the University of Auckland (UoA) pharmacy cohort, their activity on Facebook©, and their professional decision making skills.

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  • What influences the association between previous and future crashes among cyclists.

    Tin Tin, Sandar; Woodward, Alistair; Ameratunga, Shanthi (2014-10-09)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Comparison and refinement of hip joint centre prediction methods on a large contemporary population

    Zhang, Ju; Hislop-Jambrich, J; Besier, T (2014)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The location of the hip joint centre (HJC) is critical for accurate lower limb kinematics. A number of methods allow the HJC to be predicted from the locations of bony pelvic landmarks. However, widely used predictions methods are often developed on small populations, or have inappropriate parameters when considering different populations. We compare the accuracy of prediction methods by Tylkowski[1], Bell[2], and Seidel[3], and update their parameters using a large urban population. 3-D models of the pelvis were automatically segmented from 159 (86 male, 73 female) post-mortem CT scans collected at the Victorian Insitute of Forensic Medicine. The dataset reflects a contemporary western urban adult population from the state of Victoria, Australia. Bony landmarks (ASIS, PSIS, symphysis pubis) were defined on an atlas model and propagated to correspondent positions on each subject-specific model. The three published methods above were used to predict HJC locations first using their published parameters, then using parameters fitted to the current dataset. Ground truth HJC locations were calculated as the centre of a sphere fitted to the acetabular regions of each model. Using published parameters, mean errors in millimetres for the Tylkowski, Bell, and Seidel methods were, respectively, 23 (4.9), 26 (4.1), and 18 (3.9). After fitting parameters to the current dataset, corresponding mean errors were 13 (5.5), 7.3(4.0), and 5.7 (3.3). Published parameter errors were similar to published errors for the Tylkowski and Bell methods, and more than twice that published for the Seidel method. After fitting parameters, errors for all methods were significantly lower than those previously published. These results highlight the need to validate and recalibrate joint centre prediction methods on large and population-specific datasets.

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  • Collaborative Problem Solving for Do-ers and Teachers of Mathematics

    Sheryn, Sarah; Frankcom, G; Ledger, G (2014-11-27)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    This study sought to explore and analyse the phenomenon of maths anxiety within a real-life context, and to identify if levels of maths anxiety can be reduced through participation in a reciprocal teaching process. This poster presents a small element of the larger study, which investigated how to reduce maths anxiety in teacher candidates. Maths anxiety is a well-researched phenomenon that is known to impede the successful mathematics teaching and learning experiences of some teacher candidates. The maths anxiety these students bring to their mathematics education courses results in poor quality mathematics teaching (Biddulph 1999; Frankcom 2006; Sloan 2010). Mathematics education lecturers have become increasingly aware of how some students become visibly anxious when they walk into the mathematics classroom, and/or are asked to collaborate to solve mathematical problems. These observations are supported by the level of maths anxiety reported by these students. The model developed for this study was informed by the work of Palinscar and Brown (1984) and complemented by problem-solving models from Mullis, et al. (2008), Reilly, Parsons and Bortolot (2009), and Polya (1945). The Revised Reciprocal Teaching Model (RRTM) was designed is to facilitate teacher candidates’ access to mathematical practices used in schools, and simultaneously develop their personal mathematical knowledge and understanding. Cognisant of the problem solving and peer mentoring literature, researchers provided opportunities for graduates to develop adaptive expertise. While peer mentoring is thoroughly established in literacy education it is under-researched within mathematics education. Reciprocal teaching falls within this area of research and provides a framework for individuals to mutually support each other while learning. The RRTM was developed to promote discourse within mathematical communities in an attempt to reduce maths anxiety. The implementation of the RRTM was through a two-phased structured framework, designed to take place over a university calendar year. The framework began with specific training of peer mentors who in turn worked with assigned mentees. The second phase promoted less reliance on the peer mentors and resulted in the students forming their own peer mentoring groups outside of class time. Results suggest that the model has a positive effect on students’ ability to confidently talk about and solve mathematical problems. This is evidenced by the decrease in maths anxiety levels self-reported by teacher candidates. This research indicates the RRTM has the potential to reduce maths anxiety levels of teacher candidates and produce confident do-ers and teachers of mathematics.

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  • Paternal depression during pregnancy and after childbirth: evidence from Growing Up in New Zealand

    Underwood, Lisa; Atatoa Carr, P; Berry, S; Grant, Cameron; Peterson, Elizabeth; Waldie, Karen; Morton, Susan (2016-07-06)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background: There is little evidence on depression among men whose partners are pregnant or have recently given birth. Methods: An ethnically and socioeconomically diverse sample of 3528 men living in New Zealand completed interviews during their partner's pregnancy and nine months after the birth of their child. Depression symptoms were measured using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) and the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). Rates of depression (defined as EPDS>12 and PHQ-9>9) and associations with a range of paternal and maternal characteristics were explored using logistic regression. Results: Antenatal paternal depression, which affected 2.3% of fathers, was associated with paternal perceived stress (OR=1.4, 95%CI 1.3 to 1.5) and fair to poor paternal health (OR=2, 95%CI 1.1 to 3.5) during their partner's pregnancy. Postnatal paternal depression affected 4.3% of fathers and was associated with paternal perceived stress in pregnancy (OR=1.12, 95%CI 1.1 to 1.2), relationship status at nine months after childbirth (OR=5.6, 95%CI 2 to 15.7), fair to poor paternal health at nine months (OR=3.3, 95%CI 2 to 5.1), employment status at nine months (OR=1.8, 95%CI 1.1 to 3.1) and a past history of depression (OR=2.8, 95%CI 1.7 to 4.7). Conclusions: Expectant fathers are at risk of depression if they feel stressed or are in poor health. In this study, rates of depression were higher during the postpartum period and were associated with adverse social and relationship factors. Identifying who is most at-risk of paternal depression and when will help inform interventions to help men and their families.

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