430 results for Conference poster

  • The potential of Shimokitazawa's open Public Spaces for the production of - creative, innovative, and participated - local culture oriented city making

    Dionisio, M.R.; Ota, H.; De Souza, M.C. (2011)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    The contemporary urban paradigm has started to focus the capabilities of urban communities to support, participate in, and develop creative Regeneration methods that promote the integration of local socio-cultural features, along with the competitiveness and attractiveness of cities, in the international panorama (Pratt, 2010). The purpose of this research is to dissertate the importance of Public Spaces for the success of urban regeneration trends that integrate cultural features, and simultaneously, contribute for the promotion of local identiy and creative public engagement. Considering the scarcity of open space per citizen in Tokyo, in comparison to other cities, Tokyo VOID is a research project (Rahmann, H. - The University of Melbourne; Jonas, M. - RMIT University) that focuses the importance of promoting flexible public uses in temporary vacant spaces, towards the reinforcement of sustainable principles in the city’s open spaces network (Rahmann and Jonas, 2010).

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  • How to flip the language classroom

    Cunningham, U. (2014)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    Flipping the classroom means presenting new material digitally (e.g. as mini-­‐lectures, videos, hypertext or audio) for students to access before or after class and/or at the point of need, freeing classroom time for interaction. Material produced to be presented in this way is enduring or non-­‐transient – it can be rewound, revisited, reused and repurposed, giving the learner control of the when, where and how of their learning.

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  • Flipping the language classroom

    Cunningham, U. (2014)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Elastomeric micropillar arrays for the study of protrusive forces in hyphal invasion

    Nock, V.; Tayagui, A.; Garrill, A. (2015)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    Fungi and Oomycetes are microorganisms that can be pathogenic and grow invasively causing significant economic losses and diseases1. • These organisms grow by extending the cell at the tip. This involves turgor pressure, cell wall yielding and a dynamic cytoskeleton, giving rise to a protrusive force2,3. •A Lab-on-a-Chip platform, with integrated force sensor based on elastomeric micro-pillars, is allowing us to study the molecular mechanisms which enable the generation of protrusive force at the tip of invasively-growing hyphae. •A maximum force of 16 μN was measured for the oomycete Achlya bisexualis cultured on the chip.

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  • Effect of Porous Paving on Tree Growth

    Morgenroth, J. (2009)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    Porous paving has increasingly been installed in urban areas as a stormwater management strategy. Unlike standard impervious pavements, porous alternatives are permeable to air and water. Intuitively, this should provide a more hospitable growing environment for urban trees. This research provides insights into the interacting effects of pavement porosity and construction technique on street tree growth.

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  • Guidance on the utilisation of ground motion simulations in engineering practice

    Bradley, Brendon; Pettinga, Didier; Baker, Jack W. (2016)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    This poster presents ongoing work to develop guidance on the utilization of ground motion simulations for engineering practice. The two central ideas in the guidance are, firstly, the indended use of the simulations: For hazard analysis and/or providing ground motion records for use in seismic response analysis of engineered structures. Secondly, a heriarichal validation matrix to systematically develop predictive confidence in the simulated motions in generic regions through to site-specific applications. There are two principal manners in which simulated ground motions can be utilized: In determination of the seismic hazard: Most rigorously, the seismic hazard would be directly obtained from ground motion simulation-based PSHA (e.g. CyberShake). Alternatively, simulations can inform the functional form in empirical ground motion models. Ground motions for seismic response analysis: Simulated ground motions can supplement existing empirical (as-recorded) ground motion databases (e.g. for large Mwsmall Rrup cases which are poorly represented). Target amplitudes can be defined from traditional or simulation-based PSHA, or a code-based response spectrum.

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  • A Case Study of Successful Performance of Retrofitted Masonry Substations

    Misnon, Noor Aina; Dizhur, Dmytro; Mackenzie, John; Fikri, Rijalul; Abeling, Shannon; Ingham, Jason (2016)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    Since the mid 1990s, the Christchurch inventory of substation buildings was seismically retrofitted as part of the Risk and Realities improvement programme. • The substation buildings were retrofitted using a system of simple and cost-effective steel elements. • The 2010/2011 Canterbury earthquakes caused significant immediate disruption to power distribution network in Christchurch. • It took a single day in September 2010 and ten days in February 2011 to restore power to 90% customers. Tostudytheseismicperformanceofmasonrysubstationbuildingsfromamulti-disciplinary perspective on structural,economic and social aspects.

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  • Dynamic Characterisation of Central Auckland Reclamation Zones

    Lee, Kuanjin; Wotherspoon, Liam (2016)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    The aim of this project was to define the dynamic characteristics of the reclaimed land in the Auckland CBD using a combination of geotechnical, geological and geophysical data. The objectives were: 1. Understand the history of reclamation and sub-surface geology from historical ground investigations to provide constraints for the surface wave testing. 2. Define the shear wave velocity of the deposits in the reclamation zones. 3. Define a range of site classification metrics across the region.

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  • Geologic and geomorphic influence on the spatial extent of lateral spreading in Christchurch, New Zealand

    van Ballegooy, S.; Bastin, Sarah; Cubrinovski, Misko (2016)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    Liquefaction-induced lateral spreading during earthquakes poses a significant hazard to the built environment, as observed in Christchurch during the 2010 to 2011 Canterbury Earthquake Sequence (CES). It is critical that geotechnical earthquake engineers are able to adequately predict both the spatial extent of lateral spreads and magnitudes of associated ground movements for design purposes. Published empirical and semi-empirical models for predicting lateral spread displacements have been shown to vary by a factor of 2 from those measured in parts of Christchurch during CES. Comprehensive post- CES lateral spreading studies have clearly indicated that the spatial distribution of the horizontal displacements and extent of lateral spreading along the Avon River in eastern Christchurch were strongly influenced by geologic, stratigraphic and topographic features.

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  • Whakatane liquefaction case history from the 1987 Edgecumbe Earthquake

    Bastin, Sarah; van Ballegooy, Sjoerd; Mellsop, Nick; Wotherspoon, Liam; Orense, Rolando; Pender, Michael (2016)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    Liquefaction and associated lateral spreading during the 1987 ML 6.3 Edgecumbe earthquake caused severe damage within parts of the Whakatane township in the North Island of New Zealand. Liquefaction and lateral spreading was well documented proximal to the waterways in areas underlain by recent fluvial and marine sediments. Recent studies utilizing an extensive set of CPT investigations indicate that much of the Whakatane CBD is underlain by sediments with a low cyclic resistance to liquefaction. No evidence of liquefaction was observed within the CBD following the Edgecumbe earthquake, despite the severe liquefaction manifestation and lateral spreading predicted under the likely ground motions of the Edgecumbe earthquake.

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  • Influence of ground motion duration on structural collapse risk

    Chandramohan, Reagan; Baker, Jack W.; Deierlein, Gregory G.; Blume, John A. (2016)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    - Previous research has concluded that ground motion duration influences only cumulative damage metrics, not peak structural deformations - Current structural design and assessment practice requires explicit consideration of only the response spectra of the ground motions anticipated at a site, not their durations - Recent studies by the authors using spectrally equivalent long and short duration ground motions have demonstrated that duration does influence structural collapse capacity

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  • SEISMIC STRENGTHENING OF REINFORCED CONCRETE COLUMNS WITH STRAIGHT CARBON FIBRE REINFORCED POLYMER (CFRP) ANCHORS

    Ingham, Jason; Griffith, Michael; del Rey Castillo, Enrique (2016)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    After consulting key members of the industry (BBR ConTech, Opus International, Fulton Hogan and Beca) it was found that, while the most common failure of RC columns is shear failure, the shear strengthening of RC columns with FRP anchors is fairly well known by engineers, and they are confident in their design. Flexural strengthening of RC columns with FRP anchors is a complex and unknown application and only one example of a research focused on this technique could be found in the existing literature. In addition to verify the applicability of the design equation previously developed, a few aspects not covered in the component tests will be investigated: • The effect of tensile-compression cycles • The effect of dynamic loading • The interaction between adjacent anchors • The behaviour of edge anchors • The effect of overlapped fan components • Behaviour on real case specimen • Effect of different confinement schemes • Effect of different anchor sizes • Strengthening of columns with lap splice failure

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  • Repaired Reinforced Concrete Walls and Lower-Damage Modifications

    Motter, Christopher J.; Petch, James; Stephens, Max; Lu, Yiqiu; Hube, Matias; Henry, Rick; Elwood, Kenneth J.; Clauson, Aaron (2016)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    As a result of the Canterbury earthquakes, over 60% of the concrete buildings in the Christchurch Central Business District have been demolished. This experience has highlighted the need to provide guidance on the residual capacity and repairability of earthquake-damaged concrete buildings. Experience from 2010 Chile indicates that it is possible to repair severely damaged concrete elements (see photo at right), although limited testing has been performed on such repaired components. The first phase of this project is focused on the performance of two lightly-reinforced concrete walls that are being repaired and re-tested after damage sustained during previous testing.

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  • Development of Loading Protocols for Quasi-Static Testing

    Motter, Christopher J.; Elwood, Kenneth J. (2016)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    Despite the abundance of large-scale laboratory testing to assess the seismic performance of components and systems, there is a lack of consistency in the testing protocols being used, which creates challenges when comparing test results across experimental programs. A lack of consensus is evident in existing recommendations for uni-directional testing protocols, while guidance on bidirectional protocols is limited. In an effort to address these shortcomings, specific recommendations for loading protocols are being developed for structural components, with the first phase of this study focused on the development of uni-directional testing protocols. To accomplish this objective, a suite of ground motions, scaled to the New Zealand code spectra for Wellington (an urban center located in a region of high seismicity), were used to conduct nonlinear response history analyses for a suite of single degree of freedom (SDOF) systems that comprised a range of ductility factors and structural periods. Using these results, statistical distributions of cumulative damage parameters are being used to develop loading protocol recommendations. Much of the approach outlined in this poster follows the methodology used by Mergos and Beyer (2014) to develop loading protocols suitable for regions of lower seismicity than that considered here.

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  • The Undrained Cyclic Response of Monterey Sand in Direct Simple Shear

    Cappellaro, C.; Cubrinovski, M.; Bray, J.D.; Stringer, M.E.; Riemer, M.F.; Chiaro, G. (2016)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    In 2010 and 2011 a series of earthquakes hit the central region of Canterbury, New Zealand, triggering widespread and damaging liquefaction in the area of Christchurch. Liquefaction occurred in natural clean sand deposits, but also in silty (fines-containing) sand deposits of fluvial origin. Comprehensive research efforts have been subsequently undertaken to identify key factors that influenced liquefaction triggering and severity of its manifestation. This research aims at evaluating the effects of fines content, fabric and layered structure on the cyclic undrained response of silty soils from Christchurch using Direct Simple Shear (DSS) tests. This poster outlines preliminary calibration and verification DSS tests performed on a clean sand to ensure reliability of testing procedures before these are applied to Christchurch soils.

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  • Creating the business case for investment in organisational resilience

    Hatton, Tracy; Brown, Charlotte; Seville, Erica; Vargo, John (2016)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    - To provide data to demonstrate the value of investment in organisational resilience; - To map the 5 year recovery trajectory of organisations; - To better understand the contextual factors that affect long term recovery.

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  • OpenSLAT: Software Tools for Seismic Loss Analysis

    Gauland, Michael; Moghaddasi, Masoud; Bradley, Brendon (2016)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    OpenSLAT is an open-source, object-oriented and extensible extension of the Seismic Loss Assessment Tool (SLAT; Bradley; 2009). Like its predecessor, OpenSLAT is a set of software components based around the Performance-based Earthquake Engineering (PBEE) framework from the Paci c Earthquake Engineering Research Center (PEER). OpenSLAT is written in C++ and Python, and allows users to create projects as C++ or Python programs, or as commands in its own language. OpenSLAT is intended for use by both researchers and practising engineers, and is released under an open-source license to encourage contributions from the user community.

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  • PHYSICAL AND FUNCTIONAL PERFORMANCE OF THE TELECOMMUNICATION INFRASTRUCTURE AFTER THE CANTERBURY EARTHQUAKE SEQUENCE

    Giovinazzi, Sonia; Rais, Adnan; Ruiter, Rob; Foster, Collin; Esposito, Simona; Stojadinovic, Bozidar; Tang, Alex; Nayyerloo, Mostafa (2016)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    The operation of telecommunication networks is critical during business as usual times, and becomes most vital in post-disaster scenarios, when the services are most needed for restoring other critical lifelines, due to inherent interdependencies, and for supporting emergency and relief management tasks. In spite of the recognized critical importance, the assessment of the seismic performance for the telecommunication infrastructure appears to be underrepresented in the literature. The FP6 QuakeCoRE project “Performance of the Telecommunication Network during the Canterbury Earthquake Sequence” will provide a critical contribution to bridge this gap. Thanks to an unprecedented collaboration between national and international researchers and highly experienced asset managers from Chorus, data and evidences on the physical and functional performance of the telecommunication network after the Canterbury Earthquakes 2010-2011 have been collected and collated. The data will be processed and interpreted aiming to reveal fragilities and resilience of the telecommunication networks to seismic events

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  • A Multi-Criteria Decision Tool to Support Seismic Resilience Investments Under Deep Uncertainty

    Kipp, Bob; Hatton, Tracy; Seville, Erica (2016)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    Project Aim  Create a tool to assist decision makers in understanding the synergies and trade-offs between different resilience investments.  Create a process for using the tool that enables decision makers to acknowledge and work with an uncertain future. Considering the long-term impacts of major investment decisions, in particular for land-use and infrastructure, the context gets more complicated under deep uncertainty. The solution included using plausible future scenarios and Multi-Criteria Decision Support methods to draw out assumptions, preferences, and uncertainties within the decision making process.

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  • LINKING BUILDING PROPERTIES TO EARTHQUAKE-INDUCED DAMAGE AND BUSINESS DOWNTIME USING FEMA P-58 AND REDI ASSESSMENTS

    Cremen, Gemma; Baker, Jack W.; Giovinazzi, Sonia; Seville, Erica (2016)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    The 2010-2011 Canterbury earthquake sequence, and the resulting extensive data sets on damaged buildings that have been collected, provide a unique opportunity to exercise and evaluate previously published seismic performance assessment procedures. This poster provides an overview of the authors’ methodology to perform evaluations with two such assessment procedures, namely the P-58 guidelines and the REDi Rating System. P-58, produced by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) in the United States, aims to facilitate risk assessment and decision-making by quantifying earthquake ground shaking, structural demands, component damage and resulting consequences in a logical framework. The REDi framework, developed by the engineering firm ARUP, aids stakeholders in implementing resilience-based earthquake design. Preliminary results from the evaluations are presented. These have the potential to provide insights on the ability of the assessment procedures to predict impacts using “real-world” data. However, further work remains to critically analyse these results and to broaden the scope of buildings studied and of impacts predicted.

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