428 results for Conference poster

  • Comparing virtual patients with synthesized and natural speech

    Heitz, A.; Dünser, A.; Seaton, P.; Seaton, L.; Basu, A. (2012)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    Virtual Patient (VP) simulations are often designed to use pre-recorded speech in order to provide more realism and immersion. However, using actors for recording these utterances has certain downsides. It can add to the cost during implementation, can take considerable time especially when a large number of VPs have to be created, and is not very flexible for example when sentences or words have to be added frequently. This study aims to explore the use of synthesized speech as an alternative to pre-recorded speech for VPs. Two medical scenarios have been prepared for this study, and both have been implemented using a VP with natural language or with synthesized speech. In a pilot study we explored students' retention rates of the symptoms reported by the VP under both conditions to investigate whether synthesized speech can serve as a good enough alternative.

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  • A Robust Framework for Benchmarking Seismic Performance of Modern New Zealand Code-Conforming Buildings

    Moghaddasi, Masoud; Bradley, Brendon; Preston, G. (2016)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    This poster presents an overview of the project defined to develop a robust framework for benchmarking the seismic performance of modern New Zealand core-conforming buildings including conventional and low-damage concrete and steel structures. The immediate need for this project has been seen through UC Quake Centre's engagement with engineering practitioners. This framework follows the methodology introduced by Pacific Earthquake Engineering Research (PEER) centre for performance-based earthquake engineering. PEER's Framework was primary developed to improve the decision-making procedures regarding the seismic performance of the buildings using some measurable decision variables. It provides a comprehensive understanding of risk exposures related to structural and non-structural components and building contents and facilitate decision making for territorial authorities, property owners, commercial tenants, engineers and contractors.

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  • Considering rupture directivity in selecting ground motion ensembles for seismic response analysis in the near-fault region

    Tarbali, K.; Bradley, B.A. (2015)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • 3D Canterbury Velocity Model (CantVM) – Version 1.0

    Bradley, B.A.; Lee, R.L.; Thomson, E.M.; Ghisetti, F.; McGann, C.R.; Pettinga, J.; Hughes, M.W. (2015)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Evaluation of Liquefaction Potential of Pumiceous Deposits Through Field Testing

    Orense, R.P.; Wotherspoon, L.M.; Pender, M.J.; van Ballegooy, S.; Cubrinovski, M. (2016)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    Pumice materials are frequently encountered in many engineering projects in New Zealand. Because of their lightweight, highly crushable and compressible nature, they are problematic from an engineering and construction viewpoint. However, there is very little information on the liquefaction characteristics of pumice deposits and most empirical procedures available for evaluating the liquefaction potential of sands are derived from hard-grained (quartz) sands.

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  • Spatially Balanced Sampling: application to environmental surveys

    Brown, J.A.; Robertson, B.L.; McDonald, T. (2015)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • A Polynomial Model of Patient-specific Breathing Effort During Controlled Mechanical Ventilation

    Redmond, D.P.; Docherty, P.D.; Chiew, Y.S.; Chase, J.G. (2015)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    Patient breathing efforts occurring during controlled ventilation causes perturbations in pressure data, which cause erroneous parameter estimation in conventional models of respiratory mechanics. A polynomial model of patient effort can be used to capture breath-specific effort and underlying lung condition. An iterative multiple linear regression is used to identify the model in clinical volume controlled data. The polynomial model has lower fitting error and more stable estimates of respiratory elastance and resistance in the presence of patient effort than the conventional single compartment model. However, the polynomial model can converge to poor parameter estimation when patient efforts occur very early in the breath, or for long duration. The model of patient effort can provide clinical benefits by providing accurate respiratory mechanics estimation and monitoring of breath-to-breath patient effort, which can be used by clinicians to guide treatment.

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  • Nelson Tasman Site Classification Study: Defining the dynamic site characteristics of the Nelson-Tasman region subsoil materials

    McMahon, Rebecca; Wotherspoon, Liam (2016)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    The project objective is to determine and map dynamic site characteristics across the Nelson‐Tasman region and therefore assess the potential seismic site response including soft‐soil amplification effects. A combination of geotechnical and geophysical methods are to be used in a region‐wide study of the developed urban areas of Nelson‐Tasman. Collection and reference to existing sub‐surface information will be utilised to identify geological trends across the region that can then be used to better define and interpret the collected geophysical testing information. To achieve this, the following goals were set: 1. Collect existing geotechnical subsurface information from around the region, understand the geological and geomorphological features of the area. 2. Estimate the site period over a grid of sites across Nelson‐Tasman focus using horizontal‐to‐vertical spectral ratio (HVSR). 3. Undertake Multi‐Channel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) testing to define the shear wave velocity profile for selected sites across the region.

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  • Inference of shock rate and power on effective and efficient kidney stone fragmentation with extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL)

    Hayes, J.; Kirk, R.; Richardson, A. (2015)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • 1D Nonlinear site response prediction: Analysis of residuals at a large number of Kik-Net vertical seismometer arrays

    Kaklamanos, J.; Bradley, B.A. (2015)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    Site response models are frequently used in engineering practice to predict surficial ground motions based on a site-specific soil profile and input motions, and site response predictions are especially important for large strains and accelerations, which have a greater damage potential. To characterize nonlinear soil behavior at large strains, a number of constitutive soil models have been developed. However, the application of fully nonlinear time-domain site response analyses remains limited in practice, with the equivalent-linear site response approximation to nonlinear soil behavior, using frequency-domain programs such as SHAKE (Schnabel et al., 1972), still the most common approach. For a particular project, engineering practitioners are therefore faced with the challenge of selecting the appropriate level of model complexity (e.g., equivalent-linear vs. nonlinear). While previous validation studies have attempted to quantify the levels of ground motion for which nonlinear site response analyses are necessary (e.g., Assimaki et al., 2008; Kwok et al., 2008; Kim and Hashash, 2013; Kaklamanos et al., 2015), the assessment of fully nonlinear site response models is often limited to a relatively small number of sites and ground motions. In this study, one-dimensional (1D) total-stress nonlinear, equivalent linear, and linear site response predictions are calculated using an unprecedented number of sites and ground motions, allowing for more statistically significant conclusions to be drawn than in prior studies. This study uses Japan’s comprehensive Kiban-Kyoshin network of vertical seismometer arrays (Aoi et al., 2000), in particular, 5626 ground motions at 114 KiK-net sites are utilized, with 239 ground motions having PGA > 0.3g. Site response predictions are calculated using the program DEEPSOIL (Hashash et al., 2011), and SHAKE for the nonlinear, and equivalent linear analyses, respectively; based on the P- and S- wave velocity profiles, and soil types provided on the KiK-Net database. The Zhang et al. (2005) modulus-reduction and damping curves are used in the equivalent-linear analyses and as the target curves for the nonlinear analyses. This study builds upon prior work (Kaklamanos et al., 2013) in which linear and equivalentlinear site response analyses (but not nonlinear analyses) were performed at 100 KiK-net sites using 3720 ground motions, allowing for broad conclusions on the uncertainty of linear and equivalent-linear site response models. With the large database of nonlinear site response model predictions in the current study, the predictive capabilities of fully nonlinear total-stress site response models relative to linear and equivalent-linear models are assessed. The model residuals assessed in this study are those of the 5%-damped pseudo-acceleration response spectra, calculated as ln(PSAobs) – ln(PSApred), where PSAobs and PSApred are the observed and predicted spectral accelerations at a given period, respectively. From analyzing the trends of the model residuals versus the maximum shear strain in the soil profile, Kaklamanos et al. (2013) concluded that the equivalent-linear model becomes inaccurate when strains exceed 0.1 to 0.4%. In the current study, we find that the model residuals of the equivalent-linear and nonlinear site response models generally do not deviate from each other significantly at large shear strains. For shear strains greater than 0.5% at short spectral periods, both the equivalent-linear and nonlinear model residual plots slope upwards, indicating that these models tend to underpredict large-strain ground motions. However, the nonlinear model residuals do not slope upward as significantly at some spectral periods (for example, for spectral 1 accelerations at T = 0.1 s). Furthermore, the scatter in the equivalent-linear model residuals is greater than that of the nonlinear model residuals at large shear strains, suggesting that the equivalent-linear site response model is less precise at large shear strains. In the aggregate, the linear, equivalent-linear, and nonlinear model biases and standard deviations can be calculated across all sites and ground motions using mixed-effects regression on the model residuals. Comparisons of the model biases and standard deviations indicate that all 1D site response models (linear, equivalent-linear, and nonlinear) are biased towards underprediction of ground motions at short spectral periods, where nonlinear effects are strongest. However, the equivalent-linear and nonlinear model biases are smaller than the linear model bias. The persistent model biases suggest that: (1) many of these sites may experience a breakdown in the 1D site-response assumptions; and/or (2) the site investigation data provided on KiK-net (i.e. velocity profiles and broad soil type) may be over-simplified. With respect to the first point, in particular, the underlying assumptions of 1D site response may have to be addressed in order to make notable prediction improvements, perhaps by incorporation of three-dimensional soil constitutive response and incident ground motion effects. Based on the inter-site residuals, we have also identified some “interesting” sites at which all 1D site response models most strongly overpredict or underpredict ground motions: ISKH05 and KOCH05 are characterized by the strongest underpredictions, and HYGH07, IWTH07, and WKYH01 are characterized by the strongest overpredictions (at different vibration periods, however). Because these site-specific biases are consistent across all 1D site response models, the 1D site response assumption is likely not valid at these sites. Although the nonlinear site response models are shown to offer an improvement over equivalent-linear models, the remaining trends in the nonlinear model residuals suggest that other factors—such as three-dimensional effects—have a significant impact on site response behavior.

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  • MEGA : complete sample

    Cseresnjes, P.; Bergier, A.; Crotts, A.P.S.; de Jong, J.; Kuijken, K.H.; Baltz, E.A.; Widrow, L.M.; Brogt, E. (2008)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    MEGA (Microlensing Exploration of the Galaxy and Andromeda) surveyed a roughly 1 deg2 field in central M31 where the magnitude and variation of microlensing optical depth is suspected to be greatest. These observations were concentrated in 1999- 2003, but with extended coverage spanning 1997-2007 (continuing now at sparse cadence). The imaging observations were performed primarily on the 2.5-meter Isaac Newton Telescope (INT), the Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO) 4-meter and MDM Observatory 2.4-meter and 1.3-meter telescopes. The current work signifies our merging of these four datasets into a single time sequence.

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  • Gene-Environment Interactions in Health Services Utilization and Access to Care

    Basu, A.; Romeis, J.C. (2013)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Auditory sensory memory and language development in 2 to 5 year olds

    Davies, P.L.; Gavin, W.J.; Stokes, S.; Klee, T.; Chinnery, M.; Roberts, C. (2012)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Systematic ground motion observations in the Canterbury earthquakes

    Bradley, B.A. (2013)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Modelling the Impact of Large Dams on Flows and Hydropower Production of the Sekong, Sesan, and Srepok Rivers in the Mekong Basin

    Cochrane, T.A.; Piman, T.; Arias, M.E. (2013)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • The Conceptual Astronomy and Physics Education Research (CAPER) Team

    Brogt, E.; Prather, E.E.; Slater, T.F. (2004)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    An overview of the research done by the Conceptual Astronomy and Physics Education Research (CAPER) Team is presented. CAPER conducts rigorous educational research into student understanding and learning difficulties in the areas of astronomy, astrobiology, physics, planetary science, and earth & space science. The results of this research are used to inform the development, evaluation and dissemination of innovative instructional interventions and public outreach activities that promote learners’ intellectual engagement through collaborative learning strategies. Additional targeted areas of effort include conducting systematic evaluation of educational projects, exhibits and programs, providing professional development programs for elementary and secondary science teachers, conducting teaching excellence workshops for university faculty, and partnering with museums and science centers to effectively bring science to the general public. Work is primarily supported by the US National Science Foundation (NSF), NASA, and the US Department of Education.

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  • Weighted integral rotation and translation for touch interaction

    Lee, G.; Billinghurst, M. (2013)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    Touch based interaction is popular in graphical user interface (GUI) systems, as it provides natural and intuitive direct manipulation. Rotation and translation are basic tasks for manipulating graphical objects and various touch based interaction techniques has been investigated for doing this [Hancock et al. 2006]. In early GUI systems, users had to perform rotation and translation independently by switching between the two manipulation modes either using a menu system or by manipulating different widgets that in many cases make the interface visually cluttered. Recently, two-finger gestures have become common in multi-touch interfaces to perform rotation, translation, and even scaling, simultaneously, without visual clutter. However, there can be ergonomic problems when the user has to rotate objects in large angle [Hoggan et al. 2013], which causes strain on user’s wrist. As a result users tend to split and perform the manipulation in multiple steps, which might not be suitable for certain applications, such as puppeteering based animation tools.

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  • Study of Augmented Gesture Communication Cues and View Sharing in Remote Collaboration

    Kim, S.; Lee, G.; Sakata, N.; Duenser, A.; Vartiainen, E.; Billinghurst, M. (2013)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    In this research, we explore how different types of augmented gesture communication cues can be used under different view sharing techniques in a remote collaboration system. In a pilot study, we compared four conditions: (1) Pointers on Still Image, (2) Pointers on Live Video, (3) Annotation on Still Image, and (4) Annotation on Live Video. Through this study, we found three results. First, users collaborate more efficiently using annotation cues than pointer cues for communicating object position and orientation information. Second, live video becomes more important when quick feedback is needed. Third, the type of gesture cue has more influence on performance and user preference than the type of view sharing method.

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  • Brain magnetic resonance elastography based on Rayleigh damping material model

    Petrov, A.; Chase, J.G.; Sellier, M.; Latta, P.; Gruwell, M.; McGarry, M.; Van Houten, E.E.W. (2012)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Characterising calls of the yellow-breasted Boubou (Laniarus atroflavus) and potential habitat effects

    Osinubi, S.T.; Briskie, J.; Ottosson, U.; Brown, J.A.; Chapman, H.M. (2012)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

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