231 results for Conference poster

  • Mid-term results after phaco-canaloplasty and canaloplasty

    Hurtikova, KH; Traine, PT; Loertscher, Martin; Mueller, MM (2015-06-06)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Elaborations on a theory of human problem solving

    Langley, Patrick; Trivedi, N (2013)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    In this paper, we present an extended account of human problem solving and describe its implementation within ICARUS, a theory of the cognitive architecture. We begin by reviewing the standard theory of problem solving, along with how previous versions of ICARUS have incorporated and expanded on it. Next we propose four additional elaborations that bring the framework into closer alignment with human problem-solving abilities. After this, we report results on a number of domains that demonstrate the benefits of these extensions. In closing, we discuss related work and note promising directions for additional research.

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  • Preclinical rationale for the ongoing Phase 2 study of the hypoxia-activated EGFR-TKI tarloxotinib bromide (TH-4000) in patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) or skin (SCCS).

    Jackson, V; Silva, S; Abbattista, Maria; Guise, Christopher; Bull, Matthew; Ashoorzadeh, Amir; Hart, C; Pearce, T; Smaill, Jeffrey; Patterson, Adam (2015)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Pride and Prejudice: Social Workers’ Experiences of the Profession

    Staniforth, Barbara; Beddoe, L (2016-06-28)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Sequence Coverage Abnormalities and Sex-Specific Autosomal Regions in Cattle

    Lopdell, Thomas; Harland, C; Johnson, T; Keehan, M (2012-08-21)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Clever Crosswalking - what do you take from one system to another?

    Zhao, Yanan; Shepherd, Kim; Hayes, Sharron; Schweer, A (2013)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The poster looked at a metadata crosswalk implemented between a DSpace repository and a Research Management System (RMS) at the University of Auckland (UoA). The crosswalk facilitated the exposure of publication metadata from the internal RMS to the DSpace repository with the least amount of work and highest amount of accuracy.

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  • Using network science to explore innovation

    O'Neale, DR; Hendy, SH (2013-06-06)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    We live in a world were scientific and technical advances require increasingly specialised knowledge while drawing expertise from ever more diverse technical areas. In an effort to better understand the relationships between different areas of innovation, and the role of specialisation, diversity and ubiquity in national and regional economies, we have mined several million patent records from the European Patent Office, along with their classification codes, and used them to construct a network of “patent-space”. Patents provide a rich data set when studying innovation. Networks of scientific publications, such as that in [1], formed from inter-journal citations, illustrate the links between different disciplines as new knowledge is created, while networks of countries and the goods they export, such as the “product-space” network in [2], give insight into the economic complexity (or otherwise) and the likely areas of growth for national economies. Using patents allows us to take an intermediate view and investigate the role of science and innovation in economic growth. We take an approach similar to [2], identifying when individual countries or geographic regions have a “revealed comparative advantage” with respect to particular technical areas. We have constructed a proximity network as a base-map for the space of patentable innovation. We find that patent-space is heterogeneous and highly structured, and that the structure depends on the size or “granularity” of the regions that data is aggregated into. By overlaying data for particular regions on the patent-space base map we are able to explore temporal and regional trends – in particular how the innovation systems of different countries has produced quite different areas of specialisation. Figure 1: Patent-space for New Zealand (left) and South Korea (right) - two countries with very different innovation systems. Nodes represent patent classification classes. Nodes are dark when the country has a comparative advantage in that area and faded out otherwise. Nodes are connected if a comparative advantage with respect to one classification tends to occur in conjunction with a connected classification. [1] L. Leydesdorff & I. Rafols, Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology (2008). [2] C. Hidalgo & R. Hausmann, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2009).

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  • Lower Limb Estimation from Sparse Landmarks using an Articulated Shape Model

    Zhang, Ju; Hislop-Jambrich, J; Besier, Thor (2016-02-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Rapid generation of lower limb musculoskeletal models is essential for patient-specific gait modeling. Motion-capture is a routine part of gait assessment but contains relatively sparse geometric information. We present an articulated statistical shape model of the lower limb that estimates realistic bone geometry, pose, and muscle attachment regions from seven commonly used motion-capture markers. Our method obtained a lower (p=0.02) surface error of 4.5 mm RMS compared to 8.5 mm RMS using standard isotropic scaling, and was more robust, converging in all 26 test cases compared to 20 for isotropic scaling.

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  • Aged Residential Care Health Utilisation Study (ARCHUS). A randomised controlled trial to reduce acute hospitalisations from residential aged care.

    Broad, J.B; Foster, Susan; Boyd, M.; Kerse, N.; Lumley, T.; Connolly, M.J. (2011)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background and Aim Our aim is to reduce avoidable acute hospitalisations of residents of long-term care facilities. Such hospitalisations can cause distress, disruption, and complications for residents. Some conditions have been identified as better managed in the facility providing supports are in place. A randomised controlled trial is underway in Auckland, New Zealand of a targeted, multi-disciplinary team (MDT) to up-skill facility staff. We here outline the study design. Design Clustered randomised controlled trial (~1400 residents) of long-term care facilities, stratified by district health board (DHB). Randomisation and interventions commenced March 2011. Facilities certified for long-term care of older people in greater Auckland are eligible for selection if they have high levels of avoidable hospitalisation. Intervention MDTs supporting facility staff to provide evidence-based care. The supports and services provided comprise an initial stock-take assessment and development of facility plan, direct access to a geriatrician and gerontology nurse specialist (GNS), MDT meetings for individual cases, and provision of targeted education to facility nurses/caregivers, facilitated by a GNS. Education topics are based on modelling of risk factors for avoidable hospitalisation from long-term care in Auckland (2008-2010) and include recognition of illness, wound care, care planning, end-stage dementia care, nutrition/dehydration, family communication, specific clinical coaching with high-risk residents, role modelling of clinical reasoning processes, and provision of benchmarking systems. Control Usual care: the quality assurance, supports, and services routinely provided by the DHB Endpoints Primary endpoints include rate of hospitalisations in which the admission diagnosis code is one of a set pre-identified as being potentially avoidable (“Ambulatory Sensitive Hospitalisations”), emergency admission hospital bed days, and all-cause mortality. Secondary endpoints include number of emergency department presentations and number and type of medications prescribed. Residents’ outcomes will be tracked for 12 months from randomisation using their unique national health identifiers (NHIs).

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  • CUTE: CUTting Edge Diamond Optimization

    Downward, Anthony; Zakeri, G (2011)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The Centenary Diamond, weighing 55g, was estimated to be worth $100 million when it was unveiled in 1991. This diamond was cut from a rough-stone weighing 120g; thus when cutting such a stone, it is imperative to orient the stone such that waste is minimized. Our interactive software allows a user to maximize the value of a diamond from a given rough-stone. As the user alters the orientation of the diamond, it solves optimization problems to scale and position the diamond within the rough-stone.

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  • Impact of PCV7 on antibiotic susceptibiity of nasophayngeal Streptococcus pneumoniae in South Auckland children

    Sekikawa, E; Trenholme, A; Taylor, S; Lennon, Diana; McBride, C; Best, Emma (2011-03-17)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • What drives bacterial community structure in stream biofilms?

    Roberts, Kelly; Lear, Gavin; Turner, Susan; Lewis, Gillian (2008-08-17)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    BACKGROUND The microorganisms within biofilms are the key basal trophic level within most freshwater systems. However, microbial structure, function and succession in natural stream systems remain poorly understood. This research characterises the biofilm community structure of stream biofilms experiencing different anthropogenic impacts and how they change over time. Our aim is describe the changes in bacterial biofilm communities over time and to investigate what drives these changes.

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  • CellML: Cellml.org, Tools and Community

    Lawson J.; Lloyd C.; Noble P.; Hunter P.; Nielsen P. (2007)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Poster presented at ICSB2007 The purpose of CellML is to store and exchange computer-based mathematical models of as wide a range of scale and subject as posssible. For example, biochemical signalling and metabolic systems can be embedded in electrophysiological models of excitable cells in CellML. The CellML language is an open standard based on the XML markup language and is being developed by the Bioengineering Institute at the University of Auckland and affiliated research groups [1]. The majority of computational biology publications aim to discuss their model but often fail to provide a comprehensive set of instructions for recreating the model, or include errors preventing reproduction of published model outputs. Publishing a paper with a link to a CellML model facilitates the wide distribution and recreation of that model, and additionally forces the modeller to carefully consider matters such as unit consistency. The CellML specification and application programming interfaces (API) are driven by a core team, but a growing international community is involved in work related to CellML. A community website (www.cellml.org) has been set up as a focal point for the community and also functions as a model repository. A number of groups are developing software tools for CellML and using the language for research in computational biology. A repository of almost 300 unique CellML models is available at www.cellml.org/models: these are computational models from peer-reviewed publications that have been coded into CellML. These models are undergoing an active curation process based on the MIRIAM standard, proposed by the international biological modelling community [2]. This process includes provision of comprehensive documentation, annotation with citation and model author metadata, maintenance of file modification histories, and correspondence with model authors to ensure that models define all required initial conditions and parameters. The CellML community strongly supports collaboration with other groups to continue to set standards for curation and distribution of biological models. A number of free / open source software tools for developing and simulating CellML models are available, including Physiome CellML Environment (PCEnv) and Cellular Open Resource (COR). Other modelling environments such as JSim and Virtual Cell also support the CellML format. Information on further tools such as validators, debuggers and simulation specific packages can be found at www.cellml.org/tools. In the near future, models in the cellml.org model repository will be completely annotated with ontologies such as BioPaX and references to databases such as UniProt. Models will be broken down into the components from which they are comprised, and these components will themselves be curated, providing a toolbox of standardised computational parts from which new models can be created, in an in silico analogy to the MIT Registry of Standard Biological parts (http://parts.mit.edu/registry/index.php/Main_Page). An API has recently been developed for software tools to allow interaction between CellML and SVG diagrams of models, such as biochemical pathway schematics, and work is also underway to standardise graphical representations of CellML models. For more information, please join the CellML community mailing list at http://www.cellml.org/mailman/listinfo/cellml-discussion. 1.) Cuellar, A.A., Lloyd, C. M., Nielsen, P. F., Bullivant, D. P., Nickerson, D. P., Hunter, P. J. "An Overview of CellML 1.1, a Biological Model Description Language" Simulation, 2003, 79, No. 12, 740-747 2.) Le Novere, N., Finney, A., Hucka, M., Bhalla, U.S., Campagne, F., Collado-Vides, J., Crampin, E.J., Halstead, M., Klipp, E., Mendes, P., Nielsen, P., Sauro, H., Shapiro, B., Snoep, J.L., Spence, H.D., Wanner, B.L. "Minium information requested in the annotation of biochemical models (MIRIAM)" Nature Biotechnology, 2005, 23 1509-1515

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  • Can tree weta detect terrestrial bats

    Lomas, Kathryn; Field, LH; Wild, John; Kubke, Maria; Parsons, Stuart (2008-10)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Interactions between insects and bats are well-known examples of predator-prey co-evolution. For example, moths have evolved hearing abilities that allow them to respond to sounds in the ultrasound range, thus enabling them to detect the echolocation calls of hunting bats and perform evasive manoeuvres (Roeder 1998). Although New Zealand insects are preyed upon by endemic bats, no studies have examined whether they possess similar strategies for predator avoidance. If auditory information is used to detect and avoid predation, then the frequencies of greatest sensitivity of the auditory organ are predicted to correspond to the echolocation frequency (or other hunting-related sounds) produced by predatory bats. New Zealand has two endemic bats, the long tailed bat (Chalinolobus tuberculatus) and lesser short tailed bat (Mystacina tuberculata). Long tailed bats are typical aerial insectivores and are not known to prey on weta.

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  • Metabolomics as a novel approach to study mixed species biofilms of stream bacteria exhibiting mutualistic and antagonistic responses

    Washington, Vidya; Villas-Boas, Silas; Lewis, Gillian (2008-08-17)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Experimental objective / Purpose 1. To investigate the metabolic interactions of bacterial species using metabolic footprint profiling. 2. As proof of concept, microbes exhibiting mutualistic and antagonistic associations were chosen for this study.

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  • Molecular investigation of protozoan diversity in stream biofilms

    Dopheide, AJ; Lear, Gavin; Lewis, Gillian (2006-11-21)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    This research aims to test the following hypothesis: that molecular biological methods will allow description of protozoan diversity and ecology in streams.

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  • Visualizing multiscale models of the nephron

    Nickerson, David; Terkildsen, J; Hamilton, K; Hunter, Peter (2010-04)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    We present the development of a tool which provides users with the ability to visualize and interact with multiscale models of the nephron – from the scale of models of membrane bound proteins, to that of an individual nephron. A 1-D finite element model of the nephron has been created and is used for both visualization and modeling of the tubule transport. Mathematical models of nephron segments (for example, Weinstein et al., Am. J. Physiol. 292:F1164-F1181, 2007 for the proximal tubule) are embedded in the finite element model. At the cellular level these segment models utilize models encoded in CellML (www.cellml.org) to describe cellular transport kinetics. A user interface has been developed which allows the visualization and interaction with the multiscale nephron models and simulation results. The zinc extension to Firefox (http://www.cmiss.org/cmgui/zinc/) is used to provide an interactive 3-D view of the model(s). This model viewer is embedded in a web page which dynamically presents content based on user input. For example, when viewing the whole nephron model the user might be presented with information on the various embedded segment models as they select them in the 3-D model view. Similarly, the user might choose to focus the model viewer on a cellular model in a particular segment in order to view the various membrane transport proteins. Selecting a specific protein might present the user with a full reference description of the mathematical model governing the behavior of that protein (Nickerson et al., Bioinformatics 24:1112-1114, 2008).

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  • Afferent axonal pathfinding in developing chicken rhomboencephalon

    Kubke, Maria; Wild, JM (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The developing hindbrain of vertebrates i organized in a series of rhombomeres, each giving rise to specifi c nuclei. The role of this segmentation has been extensively studied with respect to the origin of motor nuclei. The development of afferent innervation, however, has received little attention. Afferent axons enter the brainstem prior to the migration of their central targets and must therefore navigate in the absence of target derived information. Since the target nuclei for each afferent component originates within discrete rhombomeric boundaries, it is possible that the same positional information that is used by neuronal progenitors to defi ne their fi nal fate, may be available to afferent axons to direct them through their initial growth. This study was aimed at determining the normal sequence that characterises the growth of afferent axons in the hindbrain within the context of the site of origin and of the organisation of second order sensory neurons within specifi c rhombomere boundaries. Afferent axons were labelled at different embryonic ages using fl uorescent lipophilic dyes. Crystals of DiI and/or DiO were placed on specifi c exposed nerves or nerve branches of fi xed embryos. Embryos were incubated at 30 C for 18 hrs, after which the hindbrains were dissected, cleared in glycerol and analysed as whole-mount preparations with confocal microscopy. Afferent axons formed a series of fascicles that extended longitudinally along the alar plate, beyond the rhombomeric boundaries that give rise to their target nuclei. At early stages, the degree of organization and segregation of afferent axons did not appear to refl ect the adult patterns. Thus, it appears that the appropriate pathfi nding and fi nal segregation of the afferent components involves an initial profuse growth into the hindbrain, and that proper afferent patterning involves axon retraction and may require the initiation of migration if the central targets towards their fi nal position.

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  • A Multiscale, Spatially-Distributed Model of Airway Hyper-Responsiveness

    Donovan, Graham; Politi, Antonio; Sneyd, A; Tawhai, Merryn (2009-05)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Rationale: Airway hyper−responsiveness (AHR), along with airway hyper−sensitivity, is a defining feature of asthma, and greater understanding of this emergent phenomenon may lead to better insight into and treatment of the condition. We seek a multiscale, spatially−distributed, mathematical model of the lung to help us understand the role of airway smooth muscle and parenchymal material in AHR. Methods: Our model couples together the organ scale with the tissue scale in the lung in a multiscale approach to the problem. At the organ level, parenchymal tissue is modeled as a compressible Blatz−Ko material in three dimensions, with expansion and recoil of lung tissue due to tidal breathing. The governing equations of finite elasticity deformation are solved using a finite element method. An airway tree is embedded in this tissue, with airway smooth muscle behavior described by a modified Hai−Murphy cross−bridge model (Wang et al., Biophys. J. 94:2008). Each airway segment is initially assumed to be radially symmetric and longitudinally stiff, and thus the embedded airway tree is essentially 1D. Results: Our spatially−distributed, multiscale model yields organ−level observations while incorporating tissue−level modeling detail. Preliminary results from the integrated model indicate potential use in the study of many phenomena associated with asthmatic AHR, including spatial distribution of ventilation defects, patchiness, and effects of deep inspirations.

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  • Blood flow redistribution following pulmonary micro-embolism

    Clark, Alys; Burrowes, KS; Tawhai, Merryn (2010)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Occlusion of pulmonary arteries by autologous clot and bead emboli affect pulmonary function by elevating arterial pressures and reducing the number of functional gas exchange units in the lung. The occlusion of multiple arterioles at the acinar level can have a significant impact on pulmonary function. However, the contribution of acinar structure to perfusion distribution and the significance of arteriole occlusion is not well characterized.

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