231 results for Conference poster

  • A case study on frontline perspectives of organizational change: A practitioner-academic partnership to analyse the creation of a Youth Justice entity in Child, Youth and Family

    Webster, Michael; Herrmann, Klaus (2009-11-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Test- retest reliability of an instrumented elastometer for measuring passive stiffness of the levator ani muscle

    Kruger, Jennifer; Nielsen, Poul; Dietz, HP; Taberner, Andrew (2011-08-31)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Hypothesis / aims of study Clinical evidence demonstrates strong associations between vaginal birth, the incidence of levator ani (LA) muscle injury, and a decrease in muscle function (1). Imaging modalities such as ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging have provided insight into the nature of LA injury, confirming that it is significantly implicated in the development of pelvic organ prolapse (2). Strain of the LA muscles during delivery of the fetal head is considerable, and childbirth related trauma to the muscle has been shown to occur in 10-30% of women delivering vaginally (1,2). Thus, developing measures to identify a-priori, those who are most likely to suffer from injury during vaginal birth should be a high research priority. The inherent elasticity of the muscle clearly plays a role in the ability of the muscle to accommodate the fetal head. However, measuring passive stiffness of the muscle in vivo remains challenging. The aim of this study was to further develop and test a novel elastometer (3), designed to estimate in vivo passive stiffness produced by the puborectalis component of the LA muscle, where it passes in close contact with the lateral walls of the vagina, from its origin on the pubic ramus. Study design, materials and methods The elastometer used in this study is a more sophisticated version of a previously developed first-generation device (3). The current version of this instrument (Figure 1) boasts enhanced aesthetics and patient friendliness compared to our previous device. Notably, our elastometer can now implement user-defined measurement protocols under automatic computer control in order to measure the force-displacement characteristics of the LA muscle. The device consists of a hand-piece comprising two aluminium arms, with detachable acetyl plastic speculum ends, actuated by a DC servo mechanism via a load cell. A load cell amplifier and displacement transducer are integrated into the hand-piece, providing force and speculum separation measurements. The hand-piece is connected to a control box that communicates with a laptop computer via a USB connection. The control box contains a data-acquisition device (USB-6009, National Instruments), motor drive circuit, and battery-based power supply. A custom MSWindows application implements a closed-loop motor control algorithm on the laptop, records measurements of speculum displacement and force, and provides feedback to the user. The laptop user-interface displays speculum separation and force on a strip chart, together with a force-displacement graph. The design of the speculum end of the elastometer is such that the tip is wider than the neck, (26mm compared to 18mm) to reduce the likelihood of perineal muscles confounding measurement of passive stiffness. Magnetic clips attach the speculum ends to the device which allows for easy cleaning, and provides the facility of attaching speculums of various sizes. Reliability and repeatability of the elastometer was assessed in 12 volunteers. None of the participants had had vaginal surgery, or any contraindications for vaginal examination. All participants were tested twice, 3 to 5 days apart using the same protocol. The speculum was inserted to the level of the puborectalis muscle (2-4 cm from the introitus) orientated in the coronal plane. After initial familiarisation with the device in situ, recording of the data commenced. All participants were encouraged to remain relaxed during the experiment. Data acquisition was automated with the device opening in 20 stepwise increments, to the desired separation, over 60 seconds. Data were collected at a frequency of 100 Hz. Averaged data over a three second period gave 21 data points per test. The procedure was repeated three times, with the initial run being considered as a preconditioning step and not used for data analysis. Statistical analysis was carried out using “R” version 2.12.2 (Copyright (C) 2011 The R Foundation for Statistical Computing). Results from Day 1 were compared with the re-test results using Bland/Altman repeated measures to determine any bias and limits of agreement and Intraclass correlation co-efficient (ICC) to determine reliability across tests and Days. Results The mean age of the 12 participants was 44.3 years (range 26 to 58 years), BMI 26 kg/m2 (range 20.4 to 33.7 kg/m2). Two of these were nulliparous, with the median number of vaginal delivery being 2. Data was visualised in graphic form for each subject across all tests for both days. A representative plot from one subject is shown in Figure 2. ICC’s for the second and third tests respectively were 0.92 (CI 0.89- 0.93), and 0.86 (CI 0.82-0.89). Limits of agreement (from repeated measures Bland Altman) were -2.79 N to +2.31 N, with a mean difference of -0.21 N. Interpretation of results Repeated Bland Altman demonstrates minimal bias with the mean difference close to zero at -0.12 N. The 95% limits of agreement range was slightly over 4 N, and likely to be due to biological variability. The high Intraclass correlation co-efficient for both tests between Days indicate minimal variability of the measurements. Concluding message This second generation elastometer has proved reliable and consistent in the measurement of passive stiffness of the puborectalis muscle in this group of volunteers. These results confirm satisfactory performance of the instrument in preparation for future studies validating this method in clinical and research settings. References 1. DeLancey JO. The hidden epidemic of pelvic floor dysfunction: achievable goals for improved prevention and treatment. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2005 May;192(5):1488-95. 2. Dietz HP, Simpson JM. Levator trauma is associated with pelvic organ prolapse. BJOG. 2008 Jul;115(8):979-84. 3. Kruger J, et al.. Pelvic floor muscle compliance in Elite nulliparous Athletes. 38th Annual meeting of the International Continence Society. Cario 2008

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  • A frontline perspective of organizational change: Analyzing the creation of a Youth Justice entity in Child, Youth and Family using Lewin, Kotter & Schein's change management and organizational culture models

    Webster, Michael; Herrmann, K (2009-03-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Can tree weta detect terrestrial bats

    Lomas, Kathryn; Field, LH; Wild, John; Kubke, Maria; Parsons, Stuart (2008-10)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Interactions between insects and bats are well-known examples of predator-prey co-evolution. For example, moths have evolved hearing abilities that allow them to respond to sounds in the ultrasound range, thus enabling them to detect the echolocation calls of hunting bats and perform evasive manoeuvres (Roeder 1998). Although New Zealand insects are preyed upon by endemic bats, no studies have examined whether they possess similar strategies for predator avoidance. If auditory information is used to detect and avoid predation, then the frequencies of greatest sensitivity of the auditory organ are predicted to correspond to the echolocation frequency (or other hunting-related sounds) produced by predatory bats. New Zealand has two endemic bats, the long tailed bat (Chalinolobus tuberculatus) and lesser short tailed bat (Mystacina tuberculata). Long tailed bats are typical aerial insectivores and are not known to prey on weta.

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  • Blood flow redistribution following pulmonary micro-embolism

    Clark, Alys; Burrowes, KS; Tawhai, Merryn (2010)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Occlusion of pulmonary arteries by autologous clot and bead emboli affect pulmonary function by elevating arterial pressures and reducing the number of functional gas exchange units in the lung. The occlusion of multiple arterioles at the acinar level can have a significant impact on pulmonary function. However, the contribution of acinar structure to perfusion distribution and the significance of arteriole occlusion is not well characterized.

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  • Using neuroanatomical imaging to learn about New Zealand's endemic species

    Corfield, Jeremy; Wild, John; Parsons, Stuart; Kubke, Maria (2009-08)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Isolated from the world, New Zealand became a place where birds, in the absence of terrestrial mammals, evolved a diverse assortment of shapes, sizes and behaviours.

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  • Modelling NFAT Cycling Sensitivity in the Cardiac Myocyte

    Cooling, Michael; Hunter, Peter; Crampin, Edmund (2007-10-01)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The transcription factor NFAT acts as a signal integrator for a number of signal transduction pathways in cardiac myocytes that initiates gene expression in the disease Pathological Cardiac Hypertrophy[1]. Here we develop a quantitative mathematical model of the cytoplasmicnuclear-cytoplasmic cycling of NFAT in response to calcium signals in the cardiac myocyte

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  • Stream Restoration: Getting the microbial ecology right.

    Lewis, Gillian; Lear, Gavin; Turner, Susan; Boothroyd, Ian; Stott, Rebecca; Roberts, Kelly; Ancion, Pierre; Dopheide, Andrew; Washington, Vidya; Knight, Duane; Smith, Joanna (2008-08-17)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    A comprehensive program to re-establish the structure and function of an ecosystem, including its natural diversity and aquatic habitats.

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  • Bacterially mediated manganese deposition in novel "anelli" within the biofilms of an impacted urban stream

    Smith, JP; Lewis, Gillian (2007-12-02)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The purpose of this work is to identify bacteria responsible for the formation of manganese containing anelli within stream biofilms, and study their distribution. Manganese oxidising bacteria are part of a diverse group of organisms found commonly within many disparate environments, which deposit manganese and iron biominerals within biofilms and flocs [1]. The purpose of microbial manganese oxidation is poorly understood, but may be associated with energy production, mobilisation of nutrients, protection and/or detoxification [1, 2]. Manganese has a high sorptive capacity for heavy metals, metalloids, and other ions, as well as a strong oxidizing potential, and therefore frequently induces co-precipitation of cations present within the surrounding environment [1]. Within urban streams contaminants such as heavy metals may therefore potentially be concentrated within steam biofilms in the presence of manganese oxidising bacteria.

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  • A novel implantable blood pressure telemetry device: Comparison between Data Sciences and Telemetry Research systems

    Malpas, Simon; Lim, M; McCormick, John; Kirton, RS; Van Vliet, B; Easteal, Allan; Barrett, Carolyn; Guild, Sarah-Jane; Budgett, David (2008-04-05)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The pending expiry (May 2008) of a Data Sciences (DSI) patent in the area of blood pressure telemetry permits the development of alternative technologies. A key aspect in providing new telemetry systems is a comparison to existing technology. Important aspects include stability of the calibration over time and the ability to capture the pulsitile blood pressure waveform. In a group of 6 rats and 5 rabbits DSI blood pressure transmitters (C40 or D70 models) were implanted in conjunction with Telemetry Research (TR) transmitters. Both systems incorporate a fluid filled catheter of similar dimensions with a biocompatible gel in the tip. The blood pressure waveform was collected via telemetry for up to 2 months after implantation. The signal was sampled at 500 Hz and digitally transmitted to a receiver up to 5 m away The battery of TR transmitter was recharged within the rat using inductive power transfer technology. The pulsitile waveform associated with each heart beat was reflected similarly in all cases although the frequency response of DSI telemeters was limited to ~40 Hz (–3 dB rolloff point). The calibrated offset level between the two transmitters was not more than 5 mmHg at all times over a 2 month period. We conclude that the Telemetry Research blood pressure transmitters offer comparable performance to existing technology but with extra design advantages (rechargeable, co-housing of animals, greater range).

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  • Molecular investigation of protozoan diversity in stream biofilms

    Dopheide, AJ; Lear, Gavin; Lewis, Gillian (2006-11-21)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    This research aims to test the following hypothesis: that molecular biological methods will allow description of protozoan diversity and ecology in streams.

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  • A Computational Model For Cerebral Circulation And Its Application For Haemodynamic Modelling In Vascular Surgeries

    Ho, Harvey; Mithraratne, K; Hunter, Peter (2009)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Institutional Collaboration around Institutional Repositories

    Hayes, Leonie; Stevenson, Alison; Mason, Ingrid; Scott, Anne; Kennedy, Peter (2007)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Three New Zealand universities have been collaborating on a project to provide open, web-based, access to research outputs through the creation of institutional repositories using the DSpace software. This poster will therefore address the theme of eResearch with particular focus on the benefits of active collaboration, intra-university, inter-university and international, in this area of activity. New Zealand has a small population of 4 million, an innovative and resourceful academic community, a newly implemented research funding model, based on performance (PBRF) and a readiness to stay competitive with the rest of the world. Institutional Repositories in New Zealand are in their infancy but a considerable body of experience already exists overseas which we can draw upon if we work in partnership with those institutions who have already implemented institutional repositories. Funding is limited but by sharing resources and working collaboratively each institution can make substantial progress towards the creation of individual repositories. This poster reports on the joint project between the University of Auckland, the University of Canterbury and Victoria University of Wellington. The three partners have been funded by the New Zealand Tertiary Education Commission to make available, via the Internet for access by Open Archives Initiative (OAI) compliant search engines, research outputs created by staff and students of the three partner institutions. This poster will present information on the work to: • Establish DSpace repositories in partner institutions that conform to the OAI-PMH standard. • Contribute to the development of linkages with the Australian DEST funded information infrastructure projects, i.e. ADT, APSR and ARROW projects. • Identify methods for increasing academic understanding of, and promoting contributions to, digital repositories the content of which is then available to enhance teaching and learning, as well as research. • Provide digital materials, either through the deposit of “born digital” material or through digitisation of material already available in print, that contribute to the developing digital content landscape as envisaged in the NZ Digital Strategy • Contribute to national research resource discovery service to be established by the National Library of New Zealand. Ensure that the content in the project repositories is visible for harvesting by global OAI-compliant search engines such as Google Scholar, OAIster, etc. Collaborate with other IR projects and communicate the lessons learned to the wider tertiary and research communities of New Zealand

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  • Benefits of speech & language therapy for hearing impaired children

    Fairgray, Liz; Purdy, Suzanne (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Conference details: Reflecting Connections 2008, the second conference jointly hosted by the New Zealand Speech-Language Therapists Association and Speech Pathology Australia. Held at the SKYCITY Convention Centre in Auckland, New Zealand, from the 25th to the 29th of May, 2008. http://www.reflectingconnections.co.nz/ Although the need for speech and language therapy is widely recognized for children who are hearing impaired, there is little research evidence for improved outcomes after specific speech and language therapy interventions. With improvements in hearing aid and cochlear implant technology, and consequently improved access to the speech signal, there has been greater emphasis on listening-based therapies. The most widely used therapy is referred to as “auditory-verbal therapy” (AVT). This approach is endorsed by the Alexander Graham Bell Association, but there is paucity of research evidence for AVT effectiveness (Rhoades, 1982; Goldberg & Flexer, 1993; Wray et al., 1997; Rhoades & Chisholm, 2000). Previous studies have focused on psychosocial and educational outcomes of AVT, rather than measuring specific speech and language outcomes. The current study investigates speech and language, speech perception in noise and reading abilities before and after a 6-month period of weekly AVT with an experienced Certified Auditory-Verbal and Speech-language Therapist. Participants are eight children aged 5 to 17 years with moderate-profound sensorineural hearing loss using cochlear implants (CI) and/or hearing aids.

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  • Learning styles and e-learning: Delivering knowledge and skills for health, human service and social work managers

    Webster, Michael (2009-03-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The Implementation of Cooperative Learning in New Zealand Physical Education.

    Dyson, Benedict; Ovens, Alan; Smith, Wayne (2009-09-24)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Pneumococcal Vaccine Decreases Hospitalised Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Children <Two Years In An Area Of High Respiratory Disease Burden

    Trenholme, A; Lennon, Diana; Best, Emma; Stewart, Joanna; Mcbride, C; Byrnes, Catherine; Walker, W; Percival, T; Mason, H; Vogel, A (2011-11-16)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Orbscan And Pentacam Analysis Of The Cornea In Marfan And Suspected Marfan Syndrome.

    Vincent, Andrea; Ikink, W; Al-Taie, R (2011-05-02)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Mitochondrial Respiration in Skeletal Muscle of Obese Women Prior To Bariatric Surgery and Following Six Months of Weight Loss

    MacDonald, J; McGill, Anne-Thea; Hickey, A; Plank, L; McLeod, B; Falk, S; Wiessing, K; Beban, G; Chan, YK; Xin, Liping; Cooper, GJS; Poppitt, SD (2010-07-12)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Body composition and Metabolic changes after Sequential VLED and Bariatric surgery in .

    McGill, Anne-Thea; Chan, YK; Plank, L; McLeod, B; Beban, G; Falk, S; Wiessing, K; Poppitt, SD; Cooper, GJS (2010-07-12)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    3. Anne-Thea McGill¹,Yih-Kai Chan, Lindsay Plank, Briar McLeod, Grant Beban, Sofie Falk, Katy Wiessing, Sally D Poppitt, Garth JS Cooper. Body composition and Metabolic changes after Sequential VLED and Bariatric surgery in women. T2:PO.33. Obesity Reviews, Volume 11, Issue 1, Pages iii-iv, 1-502, July 2010 Special Issue Abstracts of the 11th International Congress on Obesity, 11-15 July 2010, Stockholm, Sweden

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