231 results for Conference poster

  • Diabetes Management by Primary Health Care Nurses in Auckland, New Zealand

    Daly, Barbara; Arroll, B; Sheridan, N; Kenealy, T; Scragg, R (2011-11-04)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Methods PHC nurses in Auckland (a 26% random sample) were asked to complete postal and telephone questionnaires (86% response rate), on education, experience, knowledge and diabetes management practice, and to log their care given to diabetes patients on a randomly selected day (n=265). Results Responses were received from 287 PHC nurses (86% response rate) comprising 210 practice nurses (PN), 49 district nurses (DN) and 28 specialist nurses (SNs). Most nurses (96%) were able to identify excess body weight as a major risk factor for type 2 diabetes and elevated blood glucose levels (BGLs) or glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) (86%) for diabetes-related complications. In contrast, CV risk factors were less well identified, particularly smoking, although more by SNs (43%) than PNs (14%) and DNs (12%, p=0.0005). CV complications, especially stroke, were less well known than microvascular complications, and by significantly fewer PNs (13%) and DNs (8%) than SNs (36%, p=0.002). Stronger associations were found between nurse’s knowledge of elevated HbA1c as a risk factor for diabetes-related complications and management activities related to BGLs and medication, compared with knowledge of CV risk factors, which was not associated with assessment of blood pressure or knowledge of patient’s total cholesterol or smoking status. The median number of patients consulted on the randomly selected day was one by 38% of PNs, two by 47% of DNs and 4-5 by 57% of SNs. Overall, PNs consulted almost 60% of the patients sampled, while patients consulted by DNs were older and more likely to be European New Zealanders, tobacco uses and have diabetes-related complications and co-morbidities, while SNs consulted by Maori and Pacific patients. Conclusion: There is a need for PHC nurses to increase their knowledge of CV risk factors with more effective management required and particularly of smoking.

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  • Substrate capture mechanism provides a mode for inhibition

    Evans, Genevieve; Short, F; Castell, A; Cookson, T; Gamage, Swarnalatha; Denny, B; Baker, E; Lott, S (2011-05-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Mycobacteria tuberculosis (Mtb), the causative agent of tuberculosis, is responsible for more death in the world today than any other bacteria. As part of the Tuberculosis Structural Genomics Consortium (TBSGC), our research group previously determined the structure of anthranilate phosphoribosyl transferase (AnPRT) from Mtb. AnPRT is the second enzyme in the tryptophan biosynthetic pathway and was identified as a potential drug target through gene knockout experiments, which resulted in a strain of Mtb that was essentially avirulent even in immunodeficient mice. AnPRT catalyses a reaction between anthranilate and phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (PRPP), and the crystal structure of Mtb-AnPRT was originally determined with and without PRPP (PDB ID: 1ZVW and 2BPQ, respectively). In silico docking was used to predict the binding motif of anthranilate, the second substrate, surprisingly predicted two sites despite a 1:1 reaction ratio with PRPP. Previously, 165 compounds were screened for inhibitory action against Mtb-AnPRT. The most potent of these compounds was co-crystallized with Mtb-AnPRT and PRPP. One compound had a bianthranilate character and the 2.0 Å resolution structure of this inhibitor bound to Mtb-AnPRT (PDB ID: 3QQS) was determined by molecular replacement using the Mtb-AnPRT structure without PRPP bound (PDB ID: 1ZVW) as a search model. Interestingly, the structure revealed multiple binding motifs for the inhibitor, two of which were consistent with the previously predicted binding motifs for anthranilate. Forty analogues of this potent Mtb-AnPRT inhibitor were subsequently assayed for activity against the enzyme, several of which showed were found to be more potent inhibitors. This new series of inhibitors were docked into the 3QQS structure, providing insights for the development of more potent inhibitors. Such techniques will continue to drive design of increasingly potent inhibitors against Mtb-AnPRT for future development of a new anti-tuberculosis agent.

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  • Is negative exercise reinforcement a feature of exercise dependence? : factor analysis and further validation of the Exercise Reinforcement Questionnaire

    Lambert, Michelle (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Multi-dimensional model generalisation of human activity patterns in space and time

    Zhao, Jinfeng; Forer, Pip (2007-09-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The skeletal effects of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor nilotinib

    O'Sullivan, Susannah; Lin, Jian; Watson, M; Callon, K; Tong, PC; Naot, Dorit; Horne, Anne; Aati, O; Porteous, F; Gamble, G; Cornish, Jillian; Browett, Peter; Grey, Andrew (2011-09)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Over-expression of Human Amylin Leads to Oligomerization and beta-cell Dysfunction Associated with Mitochondrial Uncoupling, Activation of c-Jun and Decrease Expression of JNK Interacting Protein-1

    Zhang, Shaoping; Liu, H; Chuang, CL; Li, XL; Au, M; Zhang, L; Cooper, GJS (2012-06-10)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Over-expression of human amylin (hA) in pancreatic β-cells has been shown to contribute to cytotoxic hA aggregation and islet amyloid formation that can lead to β-cell dysfunction in type-2 diabetes mellitus. We aimed to investigate the functional and molecular changes associated with hA oligomer formation and their relation to β-cell dysfunction and diabetes development using transgenic mouse model that over-expresses hA in their islet β-cells.We showed that both homozygous and hemizygous hA transgenic mice developed spontaneous diabetes with different elevated levels of hA and with different time frame of disease onset and death. Homozygous mice displayed hyperinsulinemia and self-limiting insulin resistance during the pre-diabetic state, whereas by contrast, hemizygous mice had a longer prediabetic phase without insulin resistance. Intracellular and extracellular oligomers were clearly detectable before onset of diabetes with strong correlation with the time of β-cell apoptosis occurred in homozygous but not in hemizygous mice, indicating a difference in the extent of cytotoxic oligomerization between these animals. In addition, RT-qPCR analysis demonstrated progressive decrease in β-cell expression of functional and key regulatory molecules such as insulin, amylin, Pdx1, MafA, Glut2 and GCK. We also detected changes in expression of the mitochondrial membrane protein UCP-2 which contributes to decreased mitochondrial function. Further molecular analysis demonstrated activation of c-Jun/JNK and decrease expression of JNK-interacting protein 1, suggesting their role in mediating beta-cell death/apoptosis. Our studies should lead to a better understanding of the role and regulation of hA-evoked β-cell dysfunction and β-cell death in diabetes

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  • Purine nucleosides as new agents for the control of Alzheimer’s disease

    Oliveira, Maria; Marcelo, F; Justino, J; Jacob, AP; Bleriot, Y; Sinay, P; Goulart, M; Rauter, AP (2009-01-20)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Clever Crosswalking - what do you take from one system to another?

    Zhao, Yanan; Shepherd, Kim; Hayes, Sharron; Schweer, A (2013)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The poster looked at a metadata crosswalk implemented between a DSpace repository and a Research Management System (RMS) at the University of Auckland (UoA). The crosswalk facilitated the exposure of publication metadata from the internal RMS to the DSpace repository with the least amount of work and highest amount of accuracy.

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  • First born children have reduced insulin sensitivity, higher blood pressure and taller stature than later born children

    Savage, T; Ayyavoo, A; Mouat, F; Miles, H; Hofman, Paul; Cutfield, WS (2012-07-31)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Cortisol response to Synacthen stimulation is attenuated following abusive head trauma

    Heather, N; Derraik, J; Brennan, C; Hofman, Paul; Jefferies, C; Cutfield, W (2012-06-23)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • A new implantable transmitter for simultaneous recording of sympathetic nerve activity and blood pressure

    Lim, M; McCormick, John; Kirton, RS; Budgett, David; Kondo, Masahiro; Pallas, Wayne; Guild, Sarah-Jane; Barrett, Carolyn; Malpas, Simon (2008-04-05)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    •Over activity of the sympathetic nervous system has been implicated in a number of cardiovascular diseases. •The direct recordings of sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) in conscious animals in combination with blood pressure provides ideal platform for exploring the role of SNA in the disease process. •While a telemetry system has been developed to enable recording of SNA it has required the implantation of a separate transmitter to record blood pressure. •We have now developed wireless implantable transmitters capable of simultaneously recording arterial blood pressure and sympathetic nerve activity.

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  • Nano-structural organisation in ionic liquids

    Kathirgamanathan, Kalyani; Al-Hakkak, J; Edmonds, Neil; Easteal, Allan; Grigsby, WJ (2009-12-09)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Fostering the exchange of geoscience resources for knowledge exploration and discovery

    Whitehead, Brandon; Gahegan, Mark; Everett, M; Hills, S; Brodaric, B (2010-11-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Geoscience data capture is expensive. In order to extract maximum value, the data need to be consistently described, easily found, and then shared among those who need it. There has been recent momentum in the geoscience community to develop a common descriptive framework which facilitates data sharing. While storage and transfer standards are vital, they lack a descriptive element which standarizes the meaning of their contents. Metadata capture is appropriate for data stores, but often the terminology carries different meanings as domains become more specialised. For example, the term “migration” to a petroleum geochemist refers to the movement of hydrocarbons in geologic time, yet to a seismologist describes an imaging process. Furthermore, concepts associated with a term may change through time or as contextual factors in a discussion are modified. How, therefore, can the concepts evoked from geoscience resource terminology be defined and aligned to represent this multi-scaled orthogonal variability? Here we show how a community knowledge acquisition exercise was orchestrated to discuss fundamental concepts and their meanings as interpreted by leaders in basin characterization. The result of this exercise is a formal description of many of the features and processes associated with sedimentary basins, i.e. a basin ontology. This ontology allows the use of semantic connections between concepts as a backbone for search and discovery of research artifacts in large data stores.

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  • At your service: An interactive, flexible web-service for translating classification systems and taxonomies

    Whitehead, Brandon; Banchuen, Tawan; Gahegan, Mark; Smart, William; Masoud-Ansari, S (2010-11-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Geoscientists have developed and applied classification systems and taxonomies in an effort to enhance and share their understanding of complex geoscience information. However, the classification systems and taxonomies used throughout the geosciences for land cover and land use, soils, geology are neither static nor universal; the classes that we use to represent the Earth vary considerably with time and from place to place. As a general example, think of a geologic map. There are instances when mapped data contains desirable categories, but the granularity of those categories is not suitable. There are also instances where two or more maps (or data sets) lack the desired categories, or the categories across maps are semantically incompatible. This is to be expected, given that: (i) new science, social and economic agendas change what we may wish to differentiate when we look at a map and (ii) new technologies make differentiation of previously inseperable classes more reliable, thus viable. This paper describes ongoing work to create a web-based semantic translation service that allows users to: (i) experiment with mappings between classification systems and taxonomies; (ii) visualize translation maps using a given mapping; and (iii) persist their translation maps, and share them with others. Semantic equivalence and similarity are supported via underlying ontologies, which also facilitate the merging and re-grouping of classes.

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  • Human Activities Modify Bacterial Diversity in Stream Benthic Biofilm Communities

    Lewis, Gillian; Roberts, Kelly; Turner, Susan; Lear, Gavin (2008-06-01)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    This study tests the hypothesis that human impact is an important driver of stream biofilm bacterial population diversity. The seasonal bacterial composition of biofilm in 4 streams with different levels of human impact was determined over 2 years. Bacterial diversity derived from 16S rDNA clone libraries, shows both between stream differences and seasonal transitions in bacterial occurrence and population dominance at a class and genus level. Diversity analysis calculated on pooled seasonal data (class level identification) shows that while composition of the populations are different there is a similar level of both bacterial richness and bacterial diversity in each stream. Trends in bacterial occurrence suggest that the most degraded stream were dominated by cyanobacteria, the mid range impact streams by aeromonads and gamma proteobacteria, while the unimpacted stream showed both high diversity and no dominance by any particular class.

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  • An Approach for Evaluating Robustness of Edge Operators using Real-World Driving Scenes

    Al-Sarraf, Ali; Vaudrey, Tobi; Klette, Reinhard; Woo, Young Woon (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Conference Details: 2008 23rd International Conference Image and Vision Computing New Zealand Lincoln University, Christchurch, 26-28 November 2008. http://www.lvl.co.nz/ivcnz2008/ Over the past 20 years there have been many papers that compare and evaluate di erent edge operators. Most of them focus on accuracy and also do comparisons against synthetic data. This paper focuses on real-world driver assistance scenes and does a comparison based on robustness. The three edge operators compared are Sobel, Canny and the under-publicized phase-based Kovesi-Owens operator. The Kovesi- Owens operator has the distinct advantage that it uses one pre-selected set of parameters and can work across almost any type of scene, where as other operators require parameter tuning. The results from our comparison show that the Kovesi-Owens operator is the most robust of the three, and can get decent results, even under weak illumination and varying gradients in the images. Keywords: edge operators, edge robustness evaluation, Kovesi-Owens, phase operators

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  • Using stream biofilm microbial communities as indicators of freshwater ecosystem health

    Lewis, Gillian; Ancion, PY; Lear, G; Roberts, K; Washington, V (2010-08-23)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Stream biofilms are a complex aggregation of microorganisms embedded in a polymer matrix and cover almost every surface in freshwater environments. Because of their sedentary way of life, microorganisms associated with biofilms are affected by past and present environmental conditions and therefore constitute a potential integrative indicator of stream health. A wide range of experiments was conducted in both flow chamber microcosms and natural stream environments to investigate the main drivers of microbial community structure and composition and evaluate the potential use of biofilms as a bio-indicator of freshwater ecosystem health. Using community fingerprinting techniques such as terminal-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism and Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis as well as 16S rRNA gene clone libraries we investigated variations occurring in biofilm bacterial and ciliate protozoan communities. Initial experiments conducted in flow chamber microcosms showed that significant differences in microbial community structure could be detected within only a few days of exposure to common water contaminants and remained detectable weeks after transfer to uncontaminated water. Further research investigating biofilm of more than 60 stream sites variously impacted by urbanization revealed a strong separation between rural and urban streams and confirmed the potential use of stream biofilm as a bio-indicator of stream health. Environmental monitoring techniques developed in this project were then successfully tested to investigate the efficacy of an enclosed stormwater treatment system, where traditional biological indicators such as macro-benthic invertebrates were not available. We are now extending our research to 300 different streams in order to define a general Bacterial Community Index characterising stream ecosystem health based on the structure of biofilm bacterial communities.

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  • Progress Testing: Two Countries Divided by a Common Language

    O'Connor, Barbara; Lillis, Steven; Weston, Kimberley; Freeman, A; Bagg, Warwick (2014)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • A Variant of Adaptive Mean Shift-Based Clustering

    Li, Fajie; Klette, Reinhard (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Conference Details: ICONIP 2008 - 15th International Conference on Neural Information. Processing of the Asia-Pacific Neural Network Assembly November 25-28, 2008, Auckland, New Zealand We are interested in clustering sets of highly overlapping clusters. For example, given is an observed set of stars (considered to be a set of points); how to find (recover) clusters which are the contributing galaxies of the observed union of those clusters? Below we propose a modification of an adaptive mean shift-based clustering algorithm (called Algorithm 1) proposed in 2003 by B. Geogescu, I. Shimsoni and P. Meer

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  • Approximated Ground Truth for Stereo and Motion Analysis on Real-World Sequences (Poster)

    Liu, Zhifeng; Klette, Reinhard (2009)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Conference details: The 3rd Pacific-Rim Symposium on Image and Video Technology (PSIVT2009) Tokyo, Japan, January 13th—16th, 2009 http://psivt2009.nii.ac.jp/ We approximate ground truth for real-world stereo sequences and demonstrate its use for the performance analysis of a few selected stereo matching and optic flow techniques. Basically we assume zero roll and constant tilt of an ego-vehicle (for about 10 seconds) driving on a planar road.

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