428 results for Conference poster

  • In and beyond the classroom. An evaluation of tools for language teaching and learning

    Howard, J.; Martin, R.S.; Scott, A. (2014)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • A 3D seismic velocity model for Canterbury, New Zealand for broadband ground motion simulation

    Lee, R.L.; Bradley, B.A.; Ghisetti, F.; Pettinga, J.R.; Hughes, M.W.; Thomson, E.M. (2014)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    This poster presents the on-going development of a new 3D seismic velocity model of Canterbury, New Zealand. The intention of the model is to provide the 3D crustal structure in the region at multiple length scales for seismic wave propagation simulations, both broadband ground motion and more localized shallow site response analyses.

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  • Otolith shape as a novel method to discriminate populations of the migratory Galaxiid, Galaxias maculatus (inanga)?

    Egan, E.M.; Hickford, M.J.H.; Quinn, J.M.; Schiel, D.R. (2014)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • We make a difference: Learning communities in physical education

    McBain, S. (2013)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    The implementation of the 1999 Health and Physical Education in the New Zealand Curriculum (HPE) and the 2007 New Zealand Curriculum (NZC) required a substantial paradigm shift (Stothart, 2000) from scientised or technocratic views of physical education (Culpan, 1996/97) to a socio-critical humanism. • These difficulties raised questions about how teachers develop physical education classes that can utilise pedagogies to implement the philosophical intent of the NZC (2007). The research question was: Do teachers of physical education establish classes as learning communities? If so how? This study was situated within the interpretative paradigm; a qualitative case study • Data was collected by employing semi structure interviews with 4 physical education teachers. One teacher was selected for observation of classes and focus group interviews with 6 students from a year 9 class were conducted. Data analysis was conducted using the constant comparative method. From the data collection 3 significant themes developed: a) Characteristics of an altruistic class communities b) The pedagogies c) Characteristics of a learning community

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  • Predicting Perceptual Similarity of French Vowels: The Influence of Phonology, Phonetics and Frequency

    Hall, Kathleen Currie; Hume, Elizabeth (2014)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Connecting the dots: a population genetic study of the disjunctly distributed species Pittosporum obcordatum

    Wright, S.; Gemmill, C.; Kelly, D.; de Lange, P.J.; Hutchison, M.; Pelser, P.B. (2014)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    Pittosporum obcordatum Raoul (Pittosporaceae) is a rare New Zealand plant with a widespread, disjunct distribution. Isolated populations of P. obcordatum have been found from Kaitaia in the North Island to Fiordland in the South Island and this species is classified as “nationally vulnerable”. This research project aims to inform assessments of its conservation status by determining if the current disjunct distribution of P. obcordatum is natural or if it is a consequence of habitat loss. In order to achieve this goal, tissue samples have been collected from eight populations throughout the North and South Islands of New Zealand. Genetic analyses of these samples using Inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers are employed to study patterns of genetic variation in P. obcordatum. In this poster, I will present our preliminary results. In the near future, we will also use ISSR data to reassess the taxonomic status of var. kaitaianensis.

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  • Effects of relocation on mood/anxiety

    Hogg, D.; Kingham, S.; Wilson, T.; Ardagh, M. (2014)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Methods for Incorporating Soil Nonlinearity in Ground Motion Simulation

    de la Torre, Chris; Bradley, Brendon; Jeong, Seokho; McGann, Chris (2016)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    This poster discusses several possible approaches by which the nonlinear response of surficial soils can be explicitly modelled in physics-based ground motion simulations, focusing on the relative advantages and limitations of the various methodologies. These methods include fully-coupled 3D simulation models that directly allow soil nonlinearity in surficial soils, the domain reduction method for decomposing the physical domain into multiple subdomains for separate simulation, conventional site response analysis uncoupled from the simulations, and finally, the use of simple empirically based site amplification factors We provide the methodology for an ongoing study to explicitly incorporate soil nonlinearity into hybrid broadband simulations of the 2010-2011 Canterbury, New Zealand earthquakes.

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  • Can otolith shape discriminate between populations of a widely dispersing galaxiid?

    Egan, E.M.; Hickford, M.J.H.; Quinn, J.M.; Schiel, D.R. (2014)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Shaping your past: can otolith shape and structure identify dispersal histories in an amphidromous galaxiid?

    Egan, E.; Hickford, M.J.H.; Quinn, J.M.; Schiel, D.R. (2015)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • A V s30 Map for New Zealand based on surficial geology, topography and direct measurements

    Foster, Kevin; Bradley, Brendon; Wotherspoon, Liam; McGann, Chris (2016)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    When designing structures to withstand future earthquakes, the potential damage resulting from a range of hypothetical future earthquake scenarios must be estimated. The influence of local geology on observed ground motions has an outsized role in affecting observed ground motions; it is commonly quantified simplistically with the parameter V s30 (time-averaged 30m depth vertical shear wave velocity). We are developing a continuous V s30 map for New Zealand, using multiple datasets. The map will be useful in routine engineering analyses, in building code updates, and in research on site response and ground motion simulation.

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  • Ground Motion Simulation Validation using Small-to-Moderate Magnitude Events in the Canterbury, New Zealand Region

    Lee, Robin L.; Bradley, Brendon; Jeong, Seokho; Razafindrakoto, Hoby; Thomson, Ethan (2016)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    This poster presents work to date on ground motion simulation validation and inversion for the Canterbury, New Zealand region. Recent developments have focused on the collection of different earthquake sources and the verification of the SPECFEM3D software package in forward and inverse simulations. SPECFEM3D is an open source software package which simulates seismic wave propagation and performs adjoint tomography based upon the spectral-element method. Figure 2: Fence diagrams of shear wave velocities highlighting the salient features of the (a) 1D Canterbury velocity model, and (b) 3D Canterbury velocity model. Figure 5: Seismic sources and strong motion stations in the South Island of New Zealand, and corresponding ray paths of observed ground motions. Figure 3: Domain used for the 19th October 2010 Mw 4.8 case study event including the location of the seismic source and strong motion stations. By understanding the predictive and inversion capabilities of SPECFEM3D, the current 3D Canterbury Velocity Model can be iteratively improved to better predict the observed ground motions. This is achieved by minimizing the misfit between observed and simulated ground motions using the built-in optimization algorithm. Figure 1 shows the Canterbury Velocity Model domain considered including the locations of small-to-moderate Mw events [3-4.5], strong motion stations, and ray paths of observed ground motions. The area covered by the ray paths essentially indicates the area of the model which will be most affected by the waveform inversion. The seismic sources used in the ground motion simulations are centroid moment tensor solutions obtained from GeoNet. All earthquake ruptures are modelled as point sources with a Gaussian source time function. The minimum Mw limit is enforced to ensure good signal-to-noise ratio and well constrained source parameters. The maximum Mw limit is enforced to ensure the point source approximation is valid and to minimize off-fault nonlinear effects.

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  • Citing the Institutional Repository

    Angelo, Anton F; Walsh, Lucy-Jane; Thomson, Christoper (2016)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    We found over 1000 unique items in New Zealand Institutional Repositories gIRs) cited almost 2000 times in articles indexed by SCOPUS. Theses and grey materials are becoming mainstream scholarly communication.

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  • Performance of baseplate energy dissipating mechanisms in rocking cold-formed steel storage racking

    Maguire, James; Zhenghao, Tang; Clifton, Charles; Teh, Lip; Lim, James (2016)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    Cold-formed steel storage racking is used for bulk storage of products which are often much heavier than the structure itself. The combination of high loads and light structural members can make the racks susceptible to collapse during earthquake motion. To increase the resilience of such structures to cross-aisle ground motion, two novel types of energy dissipating baseplates were tested: 1. Unanchored baseplates that allow the structure to rock; and 2. Friction sliding baseplates that allow rocking while dissipating energy through friction.

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  • THE DEPENDENCE OF NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE ON ELECTRICITY

    Zorn, Conrad; Thacker, Scott; Pant, Raghav; Shamseldin, Asaad (2016)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    New Zealand’s infrastructure networks are becoming increasingly interconnected and dependent on each other for normal operation. While typically studied as isolated systems, disruptions can rapidly propagate across networks with widespread effects for both society and the economy. It is the nature and magnitude of these dependencies which are generally not well understood. With interactions between separate networks and a common reliance on electricity supply, the wider transportation sector and electricity distribution networks have been identified as having major potential as contributors to cascading failures. Through a system-of-systems based analysis, this poster presents the dependencies between electricity and passenger transportation networks comprising; airports, ferries, rail, and petroleum distribution across the State Highway (SH) network.

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  • Evaluation of Undisturbed Sampling Techniques for Pumiceous Soils

    Stringer, Mark; Orense, R.; Cubrinovski, M; Pender, M.; Asadi, M. (2016)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    Soils containing pumice or volcanic ash are found across much of the North Island. In some cases, these soils are encountered in their original depositional state while in others they have been transported and redeposited in an alluvial environment. The engineering behaviour of soil containing pumice may be significantly affected by three key characteristic properties of pumice: High crushability Low unit weight Presence of voids on the grain surface

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  • Testing of Lead Extrusion Damping Devices Undergoing Representative Earthquake Velocities

    Rodgers, G.W.; Chase, J.G.; Heaton, D.; Cleeve, L. (2013)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    In recent years, significant research has been undertaken into the development of lead-extrusion damping technology. The high force-to-volume (HF2V) devices developed at the University of Canterbury have been the subject of much of this research. However, while these devices have undergone a limited range of velocity testing, limitations in test equipment has meant that they have never been tested at representative earthquake velocities. Such testing is important as the peak resistive force provided by the dampers under large velocity spikes is an important design input that must be known for structural applications. This manuscript presents the high-speed testing of HF2V devices with quasi-static force capacities of 250-300kN. These devices have been subjected to peak input velocities of approximately 200mm/s, producing peak resistive forces of approximately 350kN. The devices show stable hysteretic performance, with slight force reduction during high-speed testing due to heat build-up and softening of the lead working material. This force reduction is recovered following cyclic loading as heat is dissipated and the lead hardens again. The devices are shown to be only weakly velocity dependent, an advantage in that they do not deliver large forces to the connecting elements and surrounding structure if larger than expected response velocities occur. This high-speed testing is an important step towards uptake as it provides important information to designers.

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  • Effect of Partial Saturation on Liquefaction Triggering

    Baki, M.A; Cubrinovski, M; Stringer, Mark (2016)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    To correlate liquefaction resistance with degree of saturation for characteristics Christchurch soils including sands with fines and silts.  To incorporate the effects of saturation in simplified procedures for liquefaction assessment.  Provide basis for quantifying the effects of partial saturation in advanced seismic analysis.

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  • Governance Dimensions of Earthquake Resilience & Recovery in NZ: A Portfolio of Research for 2016-2010

    Glavovic, Bruce; White, Iain; Cartagena, Martin (2016)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    A research portfolio for 2016-2020 1. What are the institutional barriers and enablers for building earthquake resilience and recovery in NZ? 2. What governance structures, processes and practices will foster earthquake resilience and recovery in NZ?

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  • Seismic vulnerability of pile–supported wharves considering recurrent liquefaction–induced damage

    Ntritsos, Nikolaos; Lai, Carlo (2016)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    To develop damage state–dependent seismic fragility functions for pile wharves supported on liquefiable soil. Seaports in seismically active regions may often undergo strong aftershocks following a mainshock event. Due to the short time interval between events in such a seismic sequence, retrofit interventions are often impossible; as a result, the aftershock acts in already damaged structures. Pile–supported wharves are particularly vulnerable to such seismic sequences with the main cause of damage being the liquefaction of soft underlying soils and/or hydraulic backfills.

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