231 results for Conference poster

  • Modelling NFAT Cycling Sensitivity in the Cardiac Myocyte

    Cooling, Michael; Hunter, Peter; Crampin, Edmund (2007-10-01)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The transcription factor NFAT acts as a signal integrator for a number of signal transduction pathways in cardiac myocytes that initiates gene expression in the disease Pathological Cardiac Hypertrophy[1]. Here we develop a quantitative mathematical model of the cytoplasmicnuclear-cytoplasmic cycling of NFAT in response to calcium signals in the cardiac myocyte

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  • 'Yes we can!': The emerging contribution of social work leadership to clinical governance and quality improvement in district health board mental health services

    McNabb, D; Webster, Michael (2009)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The Implementation of Cooperative Learning in New Zealand Physical Education.

    Dyson, Benedict; Ovens, Alan; Smith, Wayne (2009-09-24)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Molecular mechanisms of human T cell differentiation - a role for DNA methylation

    Sheppard, Hilary; Brooks, Anna; Dunbar, PR (2009-09-01)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The differentiation state of CD8+ T cells is an important determinant of their ability to eradicate tumours and infection; progressive differentiation appears to lead to a decreased upregulated suggesting an indirect mechanism underlie T cell differentiation. Several key cell surface markers are down regulated as differentiation progresses see Fig. 1). We have found that promoter DNA methylation is one mechanism involved in the down regulation of these genes This suggests that manipulation of DNA methylation of key genes could be used to improve the survival and function of CD8+ T cells.

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  • Resources and strategies used in New Zealand community pharmacies to identify and assist patients with low literacy: An opportunity to improve health outcomes

    Aspden, Trudi; Sheridan, Jane; McKie, J (2011)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Patients with lower literacy generally have less knowledge of health services, poorer health outcomes' and are more likely to have difficulty understanding prescription medication warning labels. To determine how pharmacy staff identify patients with limited literacy skills, the strategies used for identification, the resources available to help patients with low literacy and opportunities for up skilling. A questionnaire was adapted from one developed by Praska et al 20053. A random sample of 120 New Zealand pharmacies were sent information about the study. Those pharmacists willing to participate were interviewed by telephone. ....

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  • Molecular basis for binding and subtype selectivity of 1,4-benzodiazepine antagonist ligands of the cholecystokinin receptor

    Cawston, Erin; Sexton, PM; Miller, LJ (2011-01)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Allosteric intramembranous binding pockets in peptide-binding GPCRs create opportunities to develop novel small molecule drugs with substantial benefit over orthosteric-acting drugs. To gain insights into the molecular determinants of the allosteric binding pocket within cholecystokinin (CCK) receptors, we prepared and characterized a series of receptor constructs in which residues proposed to line this pocket that are distinct in each receptor were reversed (chimeric constructs). Two novel ligands were studied, representing 1,4-benzodiazepine antagonists that differ only in the stereochemistry (S or R) of the 3-position side chain, while exhibiting binding selectivity for either CCK1R or CCK2R, respectively. Radioiodinated 1,4-benzodiazepine ligands were used as tracers in the binding assays. Six mutations within four transmembrane segments of CCK1R and CCK2R were studied. When all six residues were mutated in CCK1R to the corresponding residues in CCK2R, the selectivity of this receptor was completely reversed, yet its peptide-binding selectivity was unaffected. To further investigate which regions may be responsible for this change in selectivity, mutagenesis of the residues within individual transmembrane segments within CCK1R and CCK2R was performed and resulted in minimal impact in binding to the iodinated 1,4-benzodiazepines. Therefore, combining the residue changes within two or three segments were also prepared and studied. This detailed mutational analysis provides important information on the benzodiazepine allosteric binding site present within the CCK receptors and provides insight into ligand-receptor interactions that may be important in selectivity of this allosteric binding pocket within CCK receptors.

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  • Targeting synthetic glycopeptides to MGL on Dermal Dendritic cells

    McIntosh, Julie; Angel, CE; Chen, CJJ; Manning, K; Mansell, Claudia; Agrawai, S; Harris, Paul; Williams, Geoffrey; Squire, Christopher; Brimble, Margaret; Dunbar, Peter (2011-02-14)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The ability of a peptide vaccine to stimulate T cells in vivo might be improved by specifically targeting the peptide to dendritic cells (DC). The C-type lectin Macrophage Galactose-type lectin, MGL (CD301), has been shown to bind to N-acetyl-galactosamine (GalNAc) and small peptides bearing O-linked GalNAc. Synthetic GalNAc can be produced using relatively simple organic chemistry when compared with the complicated branched sugars that are recognised by other C-type lectins. MGL therefore represents a promising target for the design of synthetic peptide vaccines. We have identified that antigen-presenting cells in human skin express MGL and have confirmed that CD14+ dermal DCs might be targeted via MGL. The intracellular fate of MGL following internalisation was tracked by confocal microscopy. MGL traffics through early endosomes to late endosomes/lysosomes, and colocalises with MHC class I and class II. Synthetic glycopeptides were produced incorporating either native O-linked GalNAc or GalNAc residues linked to the peptide chain via non-native “Click” chemistry. Biophysical analysis of the ability of both “Click” and native glycopeptides peptides with recombinant MGL confirmed the ability of both these peptides to bind MGL. Ongoing work aims to determine whether targeting to MGL using these synthetic peptides results in efficient presentation of antigen to T cells.

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  • In vivo and in vitro assessment of the action of the antitumour benzonaphthyridine derivative SN 28049 on the murine Colon 38

    Chen, Ying; Finlay, GJ; Richardson, E; Baguley, BC (2010-05)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    SN 28049 a new DNA binding benzonaphthyridine derivative targeting the topoisomerase II enzyme is curative against the murine Co38 adenocarcinoma, whereas another agent targeting the same enzyme, etoposide, is relatively ineffective against this tumour.

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  • Managing inpatient hypoglycaemia: A clinical audit

    Coats, A; Marshall, Dianne (2010-09-10)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Aim To examine nursing management of hypoglycaemic episodes in the hospitalised adult patient with Type 1 or Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in the general medical/surgical wards at a secondary level hospital. Objective To describe hypoglycaemia treatment patterns in the adult inpatient by examining nursing adherence to the Northland District Health Board hospital hypoglycaemia protocol. Method A retrospective audit of 32 sets of treatment and progress notes identified nurses’ adherence to the protocol for management of inpatient hypoglycaemia . Results Adherence to the individual steps of the protocol was low. Nurses administered the recommended initial treatment in 40.4% of cases. Within 30 minutes of detection, 36.7% episodes were corrected. Medical staff were informed of hypoglycaemia in 11.4% of cases. This step achieved the lowest adherence. Nurses documented 87.7% of episodes. There was a high degree of recurrent hypoglycaemia (71.9%). Discussion It is critical to patient outcomes that the steps of the protocol are undertaken correctly. Failure to provide the recommended treatment resulted in some patients experiencing prolonged episodes. Whilst frequency of nursing documentation of episodes was high, critical assessment of causes and or a management plan were not routinely documented. Nurses did not routinely advise medical staff of episodes, consequently medical review of causes of hypoglycaemia and the management plan occurred infrequently. Failure to review management contributed to the high number of recurrent episodes.

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  • A Structure-Based Model Analysis Of Ventilation And Contrast Gas Distribution In The Ovine Lung

    Mitchell, JH; Hoffman, EA; Mitchell, Jennine (2011-05-23)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Rationale: Sheep are increasingly used as a model for human ventilation, however there are substantive anatomical differences between human and ovine lungs that may affect the gravitational distribution of tissue at rest and during ventilation. Understanding ventilation and gas transport in the ovine lung is important for interpreting measurements acquired via in vivo gas contrast imaging, such as xenon enhanced computed tomography (Xe-CT). In this study a computational model that integrates finite elastic deformation of the soft tissue with distribution of inspired air was applied to the ovine lung to determine whether a model that is consistent with human ventilation and gas distribution in also suitable for the simulation of ventilation in experimental animals. Methods: Xe-CT imaging was acquired in three sheep at the University of Iowa Division of Physiologic Imaging. Image based finite element meshes were constructed for each lung and the airway tree at a positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) of 25 cmH 20 in prone and supine postures. Ventilation and gas transport were simulated for each animal using a computational model that includes finite deformation elasticity to define the pressure volume relationship of the lung, and time-dependent advective and diffusive transport of inhaled Xe gas. Gravitational deformation was simulated prone and supine, and ventilation was simulated for the prone lung. The specific volume change predicted from the advective flow simulation was compared to specific ventilation calculated using the time constant method that is used in Xe-CT analysis. Results: The finite deformation model accurately predicts the regional tissue density in prone but underestimates the supine gradient. Ventilation simulated in the prone posture for each of the three animals indicates that the ventilation distribution predicted by an advective flow model typically differs from that predicted from the time constant method of analysis. The R 2 correlations between the simulations and time constant calculations were 0.7824, 0.3423 and 0.42881 for each of the three animals. Conclusions: The human-consistent model is inadequate for predicting ventilation in supine sheep, because the model does not include movement of the heart or fluid shifts that were evident in the imaging. However the model is sufficiently predictive for the prone ovine lung. That advective ventilation differs from inert gas transport is consistent with experimental findings that show a correlation of R 2 of 0.66 between specific volume and ventilation calculated from tracer gas mixing (1). Fuld et al (2008) J. Appl. Physiol 104:1174-1184 This abstract is funded by: NIH Grant ROI-HL-064368-06A1

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  • Safety and efficacy of a superantigen based vaccine carrier in human MHC II-CD4 transgenic mice

    Radcliff, FJ; Munro, GH; Fraser, JD (2008-12-08)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Inhibition of complement by Staphylococcal superantigen-like protein 7 in vitro and in vivo

    Lorenz, Natalie; Fraser, John; Radcliff, F (2010-12-07)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Characterisation of a transgenic ovine model of Huntington’s disease

    Reid, Susanne; Handley, R; Patassini, S; Rudiger, S; Keynes, P; McLaughlan, C; Waldvogel, H; Jacobsen, J; MacDonald, M; Gusella, J; Morton, J; Bawden, S; Faull, R; Snell, R (2011-09-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    A transgenic ovine model of Huntington’s disease has been developed to enable the examination of the earliest disease changes in a large mammal. Ovis aries were selected because their basal ganglia and cortex is similar to analogous regions of the human brain. Importantly, they live for more than a decade, allowing for the study of the chronic effects of a fulllength HTT expressing transgene. Microinjection of a fulllength human HD cDNA containing 73 polyglutamine repeats under the control of the human promoter, resulted in six transgenic founders varying in copy-number of the transgene.

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  • What Does My Grade Mean?: Differing Assessment Models in Chemistry.

    Salter, David (2009-06)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Determining whether students have learnt what was intended is a crucial aspect of every course. How this is done and what the outcome shows can however vary greatly. Traditionally in New Zealand, tertiary students’ academic ability is assessed using methods that allow for discrimination between students through norm-referencing, typically producing a single cumulative percentage value which is translated into a letter grade. In contrast, the Government-mandated system for assessing secondary school students in New Zealand is based on a model of criterion-referenced assessment that aims to describe students’ current level of performance with reference to specific performance criteria which are derived from national curriculum statements. Consequently, in progressing from secondary to tertiary education in New Zealand, students experience a major change in the assessment of their performance from being independent of others to being relative to others. A comparison of these two assessment systems used in New Zealand will be presented as well as a description of how standards-based assessment is being introduced into several first-year tertiary chemistry courses as a way to better indicate students’ current capabilities and assist students in the transition between secondary and tertiary education.

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  • Examination of miRNAs involved in programming human T cells

    Sheppard, Hilary; Feisst, Vaughan; Brooks, Anna; Dunbar, R (2011-09)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The differentiation state of CD8+ T cells is an important determinant of their ability to eradicate tumours and infection; progressive differentiation appears to lead to a decreased effectiveness. Therefore the development of effective immunotherapies depends on a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie T cell differentiation. Several key cell surface markers are down regulated as differentiation progresses so we can define CD8+ T cells into 4 main subsets (see Fig. 1). Each subset is generated by a specific transcriptional programme. Our hypothesis is that miRNAs are important in this process of T cell differentation. If you take a cancer patient’s cells, expand in vitro, and re-infuse to the patient, the phenotype of the T cell will determine its efficacy in vivo. We have found that we can pre-condition T cells using the cytokine IL21 to have a more favourable phenotype than using the traditionally used cytokine IL2 (data not shown). We aim to explore this cytokine driven differentiation process by examining the miRNAs involved.

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  • Islet human amylin oligomer formation is differentially correlated with β-cell death and diabetes onset between homozygous and hemizygous human amylin transgenic mice

    Zhang, S; Liu, H; Li, XL; Au, M; Chuang, CL; Cooper, GJS (2010)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    One of the pathological features of type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is the presence of islet amyloid deposits comprising mainly human amylin (hA)/hIAPP. Recent studies suggested that soluble oligomers of human amylin may be the primary cause of β-cell damage and thus contribute to the onset/development of T2DM. However, the molecular basis of this process remains to be fully elucidated. We aimed to investigate the connection between soluble oligomers and hA cytotoxicity, and their correlation with diabetes development using a rodent model of diabetes.

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  • Resources and strategies used in New Zealand community pharmacies to identify and assist patients with low literacy: An opportunity to improve health outcomes.

    Aspden, Trudi; Sheridan, JL; McKie, J (2011)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background: Patients with lower literacy generally have less knowledge of health services, poorer health outcomes[1] and are more likely to have difficulty understanding prescription medication warning labels[2]. Objectives: To determine how pharmacy staff identify patients with limited literacy skills, the strategies used for identification, the resources available to help patients with low literacy and opportunities for upskilling. Methodology: A questionnaire was adapted from one developed by Praska et al 2005 [3]. A random sample of 120 New Zealand pharmacies were sent information about the study. Those pharmacists willing to participate were interviewed by telephone. Results: The response rate was 64% (n=77). Almost 38% of respondents reported that they used measures to identify patients with low literacy, most often during patient counselling. The most common strategy used to optimise the health care of patients with low literacy was spending extra time explaining the information. Written information in the form of Self Care cards and information leaflets was the resource most commonly available. However, 4% of respondents had no resources available in their pharmacy.

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  • The influence of the regional distribution of reduced lung elastic recoil on FEV1

    Hedges, KL; Hoffman, EA; Tawhai, MH (2010)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Rationale: A link has been observed in several studies between the regional distribution of emphysema and the resulting magnitude of reduction in FEV1. The aim of this study is to examine how the loss of elastic recoil associated with emphysema that develops in localized regions of the lung results in the observed trends in FEV1 reduction.

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  • Role of Antioxidants and Polyphenols in the Stability of Sauvignon Blanc Aromas

    Herbst, M; Kilmartin, PA; Nicolau, L (2006-02)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Impact of grape harvesting on varietal thiols in Sauvignon blanc wines

    Allen, T; Herbst-Johnstone, Mandy; Girault, M; Butler, P; Logan, G; Jouanneau, S; Nicolau, L; Kilmartin, PA (2012-02-03)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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