232 results for Conference poster

  • Household Characteristics of Children Under Two Years Admitted with Lower Respiratory Infection in South Auckland

    Vogel, A; Trenholme, A; Lennon, Diana; McBride, C; Stewart, Joanna; Best, Emma; Mason, H; Siatu'u, Teuila (2011-04-02)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Collaborative Problem Solving for Do-ers and Teachers of Mathematics

    Sheryn, Sarah; Frankcom, G; Ledger, G (2014-11-27)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    This study sought to explore and analyse the phenomenon of maths anxiety within a real-life context, and to identify if levels of maths anxiety can be reduced through participation in a reciprocal teaching process. This poster presents a small element of the larger study, which investigated how to reduce maths anxiety in teacher candidates. Maths anxiety is a well-researched phenomenon that is known to impede the successful mathematics teaching and learning experiences of some teacher candidates. The maths anxiety these students bring to their mathematics education courses results in poor quality mathematics teaching (Biddulph 1999; Frankcom 2006; Sloan 2010). Mathematics education lecturers have become increasingly aware of how some students become visibly anxious when they walk into the mathematics classroom, and/or are asked to collaborate to solve mathematical problems. These observations are supported by the level of maths anxiety reported by these students. The model developed for this study was informed by the work of Palinscar and Brown (1984) and complemented by problem-solving models from Mullis, et al. (2008), Reilly, Parsons and Bortolot (2009), and Polya (1945). The Revised Reciprocal Teaching Model (RRTM) was designed is to facilitate teacher candidates??? access to mathematical practices used in schools, and simultaneously develop their personal mathematical knowledge and understanding. Cognisant of the problem solving and peer mentoring literature, researchers provided opportunities for graduates to develop adaptive expertise. While peer mentoring is thoroughly established in literacy education it is under-researched within mathematics education. Reciprocal teaching falls within this area of research and provides a framework for individuals to mutually support each other while learning. The RRTM was developed to promote discourse within mathematical communities in an attempt to reduce maths anxiety. The implementation of the RRTM was through a two-phased structured framework, designed to take place over a university calendar year. The framework began with specific training of peer mentors who in turn worked with assigned mentees. The second phase promoted less reliance on the peer mentors and resulted in the students forming their own peer mentoring groups outside of class time. Results suggest that the model has a positive effect on students??? ability to confidently talk about and solve mathematical problems. This is evidenced by the decrease in maths anxiety levels self-reported by teacher candidates. This research indicates the RRTM has the potential to reduce maths anxiety levels of teacher candidates and produce confident do-ers and teachers of mathematics.

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  • Paternal depression during pregnancy and after childbirth: evidence from Growing Up in New Zealand

    Underwood, Lisa; Atatoa Carr, P; Berry, S; Grant, Cameron; Peterson, Elizabeth; Waldie, Karen; Morton, Susan (2016-07-06)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background: There is little evidence on depression among men whose partners are pregnant or have recently given birth. Methods: An ethnically and socioeconomically diverse sample of 3528 men living in New Zealand completed interviews during their partner's pregnancy and nine months after the birth of their child. Depression symptoms were measured using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) and the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). Rates of depression (defined as EPDS>12 and PHQ-9>9) and associations with a range of paternal and maternal characteristics were explored using logistic regression. Results: Antenatal paternal depression, which affected 2.3% of fathers, was associated with paternal perceived stress (OR=1.4, 95%CI 1.3 to 1.5) and fair to poor paternal health (OR=2, 95%CI 1.1 to 3.5) during their partner's pregnancy. Postnatal paternal depression affected 4.3% of fathers and was associated with paternal perceived stress in pregnancy (OR=1.12, 95%CI 1.1 to 1.2), relationship status at nine months after childbirth (OR=5.6, 95%CI 2 to 15.7), fair to poor paternal health at nine months (OR=3.3, 95%CI 2 to 5.1), employment status at nine months (OR=1.8, 95%CI 1.1 to 3.1) and a past history of depression (OR=2.8, 95%CI 1.7 to 4.7). Conclusions: Expectant fathers are at risk of depression if they feel stressed or are in poor health. In this study, rates of depression were higher during the postpartum period and were associated with adverse social and relationship factors. Identifying who is most at-risk of paternal depression and when will help inform interventions to help men and their families.

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  • Investigation into the racemic X-ray structure of the antimicrobial protein snakin-1

    Yeung, Ho; Yosaatmadja, Yuliana; Squire, Christopher; Harris, Paul; Baker, Edward; Brimble, Margaret (2015-10-22)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Gelation of oxidised cereal beta-glucan extracts

    Mohan, Anand (2014-02-21)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Cereal ??-glucan, which occurs in plant cell walls, is the major component of soluble dietary fiber in oat and barley. Soluble fibers with a high solution viscosity, which is positively correlated to molecular weight (MW), lower the serum glucose and cholesterol levels. The relevant health claims on ??-glucan as a functional food have been allowed by regulatory authorities, including the EFSA and the US FDA. In most processed-food systems, the native hydrolytic enzymes are inactivated, but oxidative degradation of this non-starch polysaccharide can, however, adversely affect the claimed health benefits. (Kivel?? 2011). Although the physiological benefits are positively correlated with the viscosity of ??-glucan, the relationship with its gelling capacity is not fully understood. The scope of the Master???s thesis included (1) the study of gelation characteristics of oxidised solutions of oat and barley ??-glucan, and (2) correlating the results obtained by dynamic light scattering (DLS) microrheology with conventional rheology.

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  • Radiofrequency ablation of osteoid osteoma - aiming for zero recurrence

    Doyle, Anthony; Graydon, A; French, JG; Hanlon, M (2016-04-30)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Over a 13 year period, a single radiologist (AJD) performed radiofrequency ablation (RFA)of osteoid osteoma in 32 patients. The lesions were located mostly in the lower extremities (femur N=15, tibia N=9) and spine (N=5). Lesion size varied from 4 to 18 mm, average 10 mm. Patient age ranged from 5 to 23 years, average 14 years. All but two had RFA as their primary treatment, with two treated after surgical excision had resulted in recurrence. CT guidance was used for all procedures, performed under general anaesthetic. A variety of different radiofrequency generators and probes were used. No complications occurred. None of the patients showed any signs of recurrence and none required further intervention. Although the followup period varied (and a few patients were lost to followup after a few weeks), most of the patients were followed for at least 12 months post procedure, with maximum followup seven years. We conclude that, with careful technique, the recurrence rate for RFA of osteoid osteoma can approach zero. Details of technique are discussed in the poster itself.

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  • Visual Acuity, Refractive Status and Accommodation in Octopus Gibbsi

    Tunrbull, P; Backhouse, Simon; Phillips, John (2010-07-27)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • High Pressure and Thermal Processing of kiwifruit puree: the effect on antioxidants and vitamin C

    Soloman, N; Oliveira, Maria (2011-11-30)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Investigations At Hi-SEAS into Team Function and Performance on Long Duration Exploration Missions

    Binsted, KA; Basner, M; Bedwell, W; Caldwell, Bryan; Chang, D; Hunter, J; Kozlowski, S; Nasrini, J; Roma, P; Santoro, J; Seibert, M; Shiro, B; Wu, P (2016-02-09)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    HI-SEAS HI-SEAS (Hawaii Space Exploration Analog and Simulation, www.hi-seas.org) is a habitat on an isolated Mars-like site on the Mauna Loa side of the saddle area on the Big Island of Hawaii at approximately 8200 feet above sea level. HI-SEAS is unique, in addition to its setting in a distinctive analog environment, as: - we select the crew to meet our research needs (in contrast, at serendipitous analogs, such as Antarctic stations, crew selection criteria are not controlled by researchers); - the conditions (habitat, mission, communications, etc.) are explicitly designed to be similar to those of a planetary exploration mission; - the site is accessible year round, allowing longer-duration isolated and confined environment studies than at other locations; - the Mars-like environment offers the potential for analog tasks, such as geological field work by human explorers and/or robots. The ability to select crew members to meet research needs and isolate them in a managed simulation performing under specific mission profiles makes HI-SEAS ideal for detailed studies in space-flight crew dynamics, behaviors, roles and performance, especially for long-duration missions. MISSIONS TO DATE As of February 2016, there have been three missions completed at HI-SEAS, two of four months in length, and one of eight months. The fourth mission, which is twelve months long, is currently under way, and will end in August 2016. UPCOMING MISSIONS The next cycle of missions will see the research focus at HI-SEAS shift from crew cohesion and performance to crew composition. We expect the first of three eight-month missions to start in late 2016. CURRENT RESEARCH The current research projects being carried out at HI-SEAS focus on crew cohesion, function and performance. Preliminary results from each of these projects are being presented in detail by the co-authors separately at this meeting. This presentation will provide an overview of the research conducted to date, and the plans for the future. OPPORTUNISTIC RESEARCH In order to maximize research return, and to provide HI-SEAS crews with a realistic workload, we welcome proposals for opportunistic research to be carried out during HI-SEAS missions. Proposed projects must a) advance human space exploration by addressing NASA???s needs and requirements; b) require a long-duration analog for desired research outcomes; and c) not confound the primary research. If you are interested in submitting an opportunistic research proposal, please contact the first author.

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  • The potential of urban forests to mitigate atmospheric CO2 concentrations

    Weissert, Lena; Salmond, Jennifer; Schwendenmann, Luitgard (2013)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The urban population in New Zealand is expected to increase significantly over the next years. Urban areas are generally large sources of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. However, attempts to quantify atmospheric CO2 concentrations and fluxes have suggested that densily vegetated urban areas may absorb sufficient quantities of anthropogenic CO2 to act as a local sink. Consequently, urban greening programs now form an important part of many urban climate change mitigation policies globally as well as in New Zealand. However, knowledge about the direct contribution of urban vegetation on atmospheric CO2 concentrations is still limited and measurements scarce. This paper examines the methods used to date to estimate / measure carbon pools and CO2 fluxes from urban vegetation and soils (collectively known as urban forests) and aggregates currently available results. Results from the northern hemisphere show that carbon pools in urban forests were comparable to 3 ??? 60% of the annually released fossil fuel emissions, while photosynthetic uptake accounted for 0.3 ??? 2.6% of the total estimated emissions in urban areas. Whilst vegetation did not offset CO2 emissions on an annual basis in these scenarios, vegetative CO2 uptake resulted in significantly lower atmospheric CO2 concentrations in summer. However, the currently available results are related to a large degree of uncertainty due to the limitations of the applied methods, the limited number of urban areas studied and the temporal / spatial resolution of the fieldwork. This paper demonstrates that in order to effectively quantify and encorporate carbon fluxes from urban areas into annual CO2 budgets, future research needs to use a combination of methodologies and be aware of the scales of their studies. Thus, before investing in urban greening programs the potential of urban vegetation as a climate change mitigation measure needs to be further investigated, particularly for cities in the southern hemisphere.

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  • fMRI Measures of the Dorsal Visual Cortex Correlates with Behavioral Performance and Cortical Thickness

    Poppe, Tanya; Leung, Myra; Tottman, Anna; Harding, Jane; Bloomfield, Francis; Alsweiler, Jane; Thompson, Benjamin (2015)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Kai Time in ECE Survey

    Gerritsen, Sarah; Morton, Susan; Wall, C (2014-06-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Kai Time in ECE is a one-off online survey collecting information about nutrition and physical activity practices and policies for 3-4 year olds in licensed Early Childhood Education (ECE) services in Auckland, Counties Manukau and Waikato. The survey results will be used in PhD research on the influence of childcare on preschool dietary patterns and body size.

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  • Gorgeous Gallery: residential aged care in New Zealand, in pictures

    Broad, Joanna (2015)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • C/EBP?? Expression in Primary Human Glial Cells

    Rustenhoven, Justin; Smith, AM; Park, In; Jansson, D; Dragunow, Michael (2013-08-26)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Phagocytosis by human brain pericytes: implications for Alzheimer???s disease

    Rustenhoven, Justin; Scotter, Emma; Smyth, L; Park, In; Curtis, Maurice; Faull, Richard; Graham, S; Dragunow, Michael (2016-06-15)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Diphthong trajectories in M??ori

    King, J; Watson, Catherine; Maclagan, M; Keegan, Peter; Harlow, R (2014-12-03)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Sound change over time has been identified in monophthongs in Ma??ori, the language of the indigenous people of NZ [1], with /u u:/ fronting, the mid vowels rising, so that /i~i:~e~e:/ can appear identical, and the quantitative distinctions between long and short monophthongs being reduced apart from /a~a:/ [1], [2]. The five most frequent diphthongs in Ma??ori are /ai ae au ou ao/. Analysis has shown mergers between two pairs of these diphthongs, /ai~ae/ and /au~ou/ [3]. This study argued that only one of these mergers is due to the monophthong movements: we have shown that /e e:/ have risen [3], but the second target of /ae/ is falling. It was suggested that this merger is due to glide weakening of /ai/. The merger of /au/ and /ou/ is probably influenced by the fronting of /u u:/. The major distinction for /au ou/ is in the first target, but the fronting of T1 for both /au/ and /ou/ is highly correlated both to the fronting of T2, and the fronting of /u u:/ [3]. Diphthong analysis to date has only offered schematic formant trajectories with arrows from T1 to T2 indicating the movement [2], [3]. Here we present for the first time an analysis of the vowel mergers looking at the entire diphthong trajectories, for T1 and T2 for the male speakers. These plots reveal the course and timing of the diphthong movements.

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  • One size in no way fits all - quantifying hip variations by automatic morphometric measurements from CT

    Zhang, Ju; Hislop-Jambrich, J; Malcolm, D; Thomas, CDL; Nielsen, Poul (2013-12-04)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The femur and hip joint in particular are complicated structures that have both clinical and anthropological significance. The variability of surface structures among individuals especially in terms of gender makes the extraction of consistently reproducible measurements non-trivial and time consuming. Automatic image segmentation and meshing methods allow precisely-defined measurements to be taken from CT-volumes as part of an automated pipeline. We present initial findings from such a pipeline for obtaining morphometric measurements of the hip. We believe that the importance of this work lies in the eventual creation of a comprehensive databank that will be of use in the development of prosthetic devices and the tracking of disease and evolutionary morphometry. A 16-row MDCT was used to acquire images on 55 human cadavers (24 male, 31 female). The outer femoral surface was automatically segmented and meshed with sub-voxel accuracy. Femoral head area, femoral axis length, neck angle, neck width, and subtrochanteric width were automatically measured on the mesh according to mathematical definitions based on mesh geometry. Errors with respect to manual measurements were between 2.4% and 7.6% on average. All automatic measurements except for neck angle showed significant differences between genders (p-value<0.001), which was reflected in the manual measurements. We present this initial evaluation of five measurements with a view toward the creation of a macro-structural atlas of bones in the hip. The automated system shows good promise in terms of accuracy and sensitivity compared to manual measurements. We describe the variability of these measurements in our homogenous population with specific reference to gender to provide an overview of what is possible using current technology. Automatic assessment of proximal femur morphometry has shown that variations are sufficient to warrant the creation of a bank of detailed morphometric assessments of the hip. We believe that detailed knowledge of this complicated structure may be used to support the development of prosthetic devices and assist in diagnosing complex hip-based disorders.

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  • An optimal sampling schedule for neonates, infants & children receiving cefazolin +/- vancomycin for cardiopulmonary bypass

    Sturge, Jacqueline; Anderson, Brian; Holford, Nicholas (2016-08-22)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background: Dosing of prophylactic antibiotics in children during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) remains poorly defined. Pharmacokinetic (PK) studies can be improved using optimal design when sampling is limited, or multiple factors influence PK. We aimed to optimize a sampling schedule designed to determine cefazolin and vancomycin PK in children undergoing CPB. Methods: A one compartment distribution model for vancomycin and a three compartment distribution model for cefazolin was used with theory based allometric scaling and maturation to describe first-order elimination clearance. The CPB circuit was represented by an additional compartment. We assumed 60 subjects received cefazolin 50 mg.kg-1, with 50 of these subjects undergoing a procedure with CPB. We assumed 15 subjects also received 15 mg.kg-1 vancomycin. Optimal times for up to 8 samples per patient were estimated, ignoring CPB effects, using WinPOPT (University of Otago, New Zealand). Optimal sampling times for determination of CPB related changes were considered separately. Designs were selected based on relative standard errors (RSEs) for model parameters and comparison of criterions summarizing design efficiency. Results: Sample times were 0.001, 0.001, 0.108, 0.36, 1.05, 1.85 h following the first dose, and 0.36 and 2.5 h after the second dose, for With CPB subjects. Sample times were 0.127, 0.43, 0.43, 1.3, 3.18, 6, 6 h after the first dose and 6 h after the second dose, for Without CPB subjects. Five samples, taken directly from the CPB circuit, were required to adequately capture CPB related changes in CPB V and CL. RSE estimates of cefazolin, vancomycin and CPB circuit parameters for the final design were ??? 30%, with the exception of one of the cefazolin volumes (V2) for which RSEs were 49%. Conclusion: The sampling schedule may be used in the planning of a clinical study of children receiving cefazolin and vancomycin during CPB.

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  • Reverse Mentoring: Benefits and Barriers

    Ross, M; Dunham, Annette (2015)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background: Current research suggests that the modern workforce is comprised of a substantial proportion of ageing employees, in addition to an influx of young, first-time workers. This diverse and multigenerational workforce provides organisations an interesting challenge, in retaining engaged and productive employees, and ensuring relevant training and development. One specific management practice is reverse mentoring. Reverse mentoring is a unique form of mentoring, whereby the traditional roles of mentor and mentee are reversed. It involves a junior employee (in age/status) mentoring a senior employee. The junior employee is able to share their recent generational learnings and perspective with a senior organisational member, who gains insight into recent trends and technologies. Whilst there appear to be many benefits from this relationship, including increased communication and understanding; leadership development; and upskilling in relevant trends, there may also be some barriers to the success of the relationship. Barriers may include a resistance to the shift in power hierarchy and challenges with changing the traditional learning pedagogy of older teacher and younger learner. Aim: Reverse mentoring is a reasonably modern concept, and as such, empirical research on this practice is relatively new. This research aims to explore any benefits and barriers experienced in a reverse mentoring relationship. Method: Participants in this study will be recruited from a Melbourne hospital, who currently run a formal reverse mentoring relationship program. Approximately 16 individuals (8 mentors and 8 mentees), will be invited to participate. The proposed study uses a qualitative method of data collection, through semi-structured interviews. Interviews will be recorded, and responses will be transcribed, with thematic analysis used to identify common themes. Thematic analysis allows the common themes and experiences of mentors and mentees, to tell an overall story of the data. Conclusion: The proposed study???s findings contribute to a currently small base of research on reverse mentoring. It is hoped that the research will help (i) inform future quantitative research on reverse mentoring and (ii) inform organisational strategies that will help employees engage in reverse mentoring relationships in ways that effectively support their training and development.

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  • CO2 Fluxes and Concentrations in a Residential Area in the Southern Hemisphere

    Weissert, Lena; Salmond, Jennifer; Turnbull, JC; Schwendenmann, Luitgard (2014-12-15)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    While cities are generally major sources of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, recent research has shown that parts of urban areas may also act as CO2 sinks due to CO2 uptake by vegetation. However, currently available results are related to a large degree of uncertainty due to the limitations of the applied methods and the limited number of studies available from urban areas, particularly from the southern hemisphere. In this study, we explore the potential of eddy covariance and tracer measurements (13C and 14C isotopes of CO2) to quantify and partition CO2 fluxes and concentrations in a residential urban area in Auckland, New Zealand. Based on preliminary results from autumn and winter (March to July 2014) the residential area is a small source of CO2 (0.11 mol CO2 m-2 day-1). CO2 fluxes and concentrations follow a distinct diurnal cycle with a morning peak between 7:00 and 9:00 (max: 0.25 mol CO2 m-2 day-1/412 ppm) and midday low with negative CO2 fluxes (min: -0.17 mol CO2 m-2 day-1/392 ppm) between 10:00 and 15:00 local time, likely due to photosynthetic CO2 uptake by local vegetation. Soil CO2 efflux may explain that CO2 concentrations increase and remain high (401 ppm) throughout the night. Mean diurnal winter delta13C values are in anti-phase with CO2 concentrations and vary between -9.0 - -9.70/00. The depletion of delta13C compared to clean atmospheric air (-8.20/00) is likely a result of local CO2 sources dominated by gasoline combustion (appr. 60%) during daytime. A sector analysis (based on prevailing wind) of CO2 fluxes and concentrations indicates lower CO2 fluxes and concentrations from the vegetation-dominated sector, further demonstrating the influence of vegetation on local CO2 concentrations. These results provide an insight into the temporal and spatial variability CO2 fluxes/concentrations and potential CO2 sinks and sources from a city in the southern hemisphere and add valuable information to the global database of urban CO2 fluxes.

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