430 results for Conference poster

  • THE DEPENDENCE OF NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE ON ELECTRICITY

    Zorn, Conrad; Thacker, Scott; Pant, Raghav; Shamseldin, Asaad (2016)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    New Zealand’s infrastructure networks are becoming increasingly interconnected and dependent on each other for normal operation. While typically studied as isolated systems, disruptions can rapidly propagate across networks with widespread effects for both society and the economy. It is the nature and magnitude of these dependencies which are generally not well understood. With interactions between separate networks and a common reliance on electricity supply, the wider transportation sector and electricity distribution networks have been identified as having major potential as contributors to cascading failures. Through a system-of-systems based analysis, this poster presents the dependencies between electricity and passenger transportation networks comprising; airports, ferries, rail, and petroleum distribution across the State Highway (SH) network.

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  • Evaluation of Undisturbed Sampling Techniques for Pumiceous Soils

    Stringer, Mark; Orense, R.; Cubrinovski, M; Pender, M.; Asadi, M. (2016)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    Soils containing pumice or volcanic ash are found across much of the North Island. In some cases, these soils are encountered in their original depositional state while in others they have been transported and redeposited in an alluvial environment. The engineering behaviour of soil containing pumice may be significantly affected by three key characteristic properties of pumice: High crushability Low unit weight Presence of voids on the grain surface

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  • Testing of Lead Extrusion Damping Devices Undergoing Representative Earthquake Velocities

    Rodgers, G.W.; Chase, J.G.; Heaton, D.; Cleeve, L. (2013)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    In recent years, significant research has been undertaken into the development of lead-extrusion damping technology. The high force-to-volume (HF2V) devices developed at the University of Canterbury have been the subject of much of this research. However, while these devices have undergone a limited range of velocity testing, limitations in test equipment has meant that they have never been tested at representative earthquake velocities. Such testing is important as the peak resistive force provided by the dampers under large velocity spikes is an important design input that must be known for structural applications. This manuscript presents the high-speed testing of HF2V devices with quasi-static force capacities of 250-300kN. These devices have been subjected to peak input velocities of approximately 200mm/s, producing peak resistive forces of approximately 350kN. The devices show stable hysteretic performance, with slight force reduction during high-speed testing due to heat build-up and softening of the lead working material. This force reduction is recovered following cyclic loading as heat is dissipated and the lead hardens again. The devices are shown to be only weakly velocity dependent, an advantage in that they do not deliver large forces to the connecting elements and surrounding structure if larger than expected response velocities occur. This high-speed testing is an important step towards uptake as it provides important information to designers.

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  • Effect of Partial Saturation on Liquefaction Triggering

    Baki, M.A; Cubrinovski, M; Stringer, Mark (2016)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    To correlate liquefaction resistance with degree of saturation for characteristics Christchurch soils including sands with fines and silts.  To incorporate the effects of saturation in simplified procedures for liquefaction assessment.  Provide basis for quantifying the effects of partial saturation in advanced seismic analysis.

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  • Governance Dimensions of Earthquake Resilience & Recovery in NZ: A Portfolio of Research for 2016-2010

    Glavovic, Bruce; White, Iain; Cartagena, Martin (2016)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    A research portfolio for 2016-2020 1. What are the institutional barriers and enablers for building earthquake resilience and recovery in NZ? 2. What governance structures, processes and practices will foster earthquake resilience and recovery in NZ?

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  • Seismic vulnerability of pile–supported wharves considering recurrent liquefaction–induced damage

    Ntritsos, Nikolaos; Lai, Carlo (2016)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    To develop damage state–dependent seismic fragility functions for pile wharves supported on liquefiable soil. Seaports in seismically active regions may often undergo strong aftershocks following a mainshock event. Due to the short time interval between events in such a seismic sequence, retrofit interventions are often impossible; as a result, the aftershock acts in already damaged structures. Pile–supported wharves are particularly vulnerable to such seismic sequences with the main cause of damage being the liquefaction of soft underlying soils and/or hydraulic backfills.

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  • Auditory sensory memory and language development in 2 to 5 year olds

    Davies, P.L.; Gavin, W.J.; Stokes, S.; Klee, T.; Chinnery, M.; Roberts, C. (2012)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    To examine the changes in auditory sensory memory measured by MMN elicited using the time-saving oddball paradigm in young children across the ages of 2 to 5 years with all children receiving the same ITIs. To determine if MMN in the auditory sensory memory paradigm relates to expressive and receptive language abilities in young children ages 2 to 5 years.

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  • Experimental Testing of Double Acting Ring Springs Type II

    Djojo, Gary; Clifton, Charles; Henry, Richard (2016)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    Double acting systems are being developed to accommodate upward and downward movements during severe earthquakes in centralised rocking concentrically braced frames (Figure 1a) The systems utilise Ringfeder®, a compression only friction ring spring (Figure 1b), which is designed to work as a double acting spring. The spring dissipates energy through frictions between inner and outer rings and provides self-centring afterwards.

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  • CVD Diamond X-ray Detectors for Radiotherapy Dosimetry

    Lansley, S.P.; Betzel, G.T.; Baluti, F.; Reinisch, L.; Meyer, J. (2009)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Clinical supervisor characteristics valued by practising speech-language therapists

    Mataiti, H.; McAuliffe, M.J.; Tillard, G. (2008)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Effect of noise upon the perception of speech intelligibility in dysarthria

    McAuliffe, M.J.; Schaefer, M.; O'Beirne, G.A.; LaPointe, L.L. (2009)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    Is the intelligibility of dysarthric speech, at word and phrase-level, affected similarly to normal speech when presented in noise? It is hypothesised that dysarthric speech will show greater declines in intelligibility with increased noise than normal speech.

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  • Influence of auditory distraction upon intelligibility ratings in dysarthria

    McAuliffe, M.J.; Good, P.V.; O'Beirne, G.A.; LaPointe, L.L. (2008)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    Communication exchange occurs under a variety of adverse listening conditions. Research has demonstrated that the intelligibility of both normal and synthesised speech declines significantly in noise; however, it is not currently known if the intelligibility of dysarthric speech is similarly affected. To investigate the affect of increasing background noise levels on intelligibility, 56 female listeners rated the intelligibility of dysarthric and control speakers under various conditions of auditory distraction including: (1) no noise, (2) +3 dB signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), (3) 0 dB SNR, and (4) -3 dB SNR. Multi-talker babble was digitally mixed with the speech samples of the dysarthric and control speakers to produce the three SNR conditions. Intelligibility was rated using direct magnitude estimation. Results of the study revealed that the intelligibility ratings of the control group decreased significantly as SNR decreased. Unexpectedly, the intelligibility ratings of the dysarthric group were similar across all conditions of auditory distraction. It is possible that the effort required to attend to the dysarthric speech samples served to obviate the effects of auditory distraction. Alternatively, the findings may reflect a measurement effect with listeners restricted in their ratings due to the overall severity of the dysarthric group.

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  • Development of Passive Treatment Systems for Treating Acid Mine Drainage at Stockton Mine

    McCauley, C.; O'Sullivan, A.D.; Weber, P.; Trumm, D. (2008)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) at Stockton Coal Mine emanates from the oxidation of pyrite within carbonaceous mudstones during mining, which subsequently releases acidity resulting in metals leaching from overburden. Water chemistry and flow were monitored at numerous seeps at Stockton. Manchester Seep, which daylights at the toe of an overburden embankment, was chosen to conduct research pertaining to development of passivetreatment systems for neutralizing acidity and sequestering metals in AMD. Median dissolved metal concentrations were 62.9 mg/L Fe, 32.5 mg/L Al, 0.0514 mg/L Cu, 0.175 mg/L Ni, 0.993 mg/L Zn and 0.00109 mg/L Cd. Sulphate-reducing bioreactors were chosen as the most feasible passive treatment technology for remediation of Manchester Seep AMD. Chemical and geotechnical parameters, including hydraulic conductivity, were determined for mixtures of organic and alkaline waste products suitable for use as bioreactor substrates. Seven mesocosm-scale bioreactors were fed aerated AMD (collected from Manchester Seep) in a laboratory for nearly four months. Bioreactors incorporating mussel shells performed the best and were capable of sequestering >0.80 mol metals/m3 substrate/day (or neutralising acidity at rates >66 g CaCO3/m2/day) while removing >98.2% of metals. Tracer studies were later conducted on two bioreactor systems containing the same substrate composition but different reactor shapes. Results will be applied to reactor models to better ascertain the relationship between reactor hydraulics and treatment performance. Pilot-scale treatment schemes incorporating three treatment stages were recently constructed to treat a portion of Manchester Seep AMD. The first stage consists of a sedimentation basin to remove sediment. The second stage includes three bioreactors in parallel to test treatment effectiveness of different substrate mixtures, depths and hydraulic configurations. Data derived from the lab study were used to optimise these designs. The final treatment stage consists of three different aerobic wetland configurations operated in parallel to compare their effectiveness at providing oxygenation and tertiary treatment of metals (primarily Fe) from bioreactor effluent.

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  • Growth of microalgal-bacterial biomass on primary treated wastewater

    Turner, S.J.; Biswas, K.; Valigore, J.M.; O'Sullivan, A.D. (2008)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    The use of microalgae as an economically viable feedstock for biofuel production requires development of efficient methods for growth and harvest of biomass. Here we describe a preliminary investigation of the growth and settling characteristics of microalgal-bacterial biomass using primary treated wastewater from the Christchurch Wastewater Treatment Plant (CWTP) as a nutrient source. Sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) were established using a mixture of oxidation pond and primary treated wastewater from CWTP. Microalgal-bacterial flocs were developed by systematically discarding the non-settleable material (supernatant) and retaining settleable solids within the reactors. Subsequent addition of activated sludge (AS) improved the settleability of the biomass but resulted in development of anaerobic conditions and increased the ammonia, COD, and TSS concentrations in reactor supernatants. Analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene clone libraries prepared from settleable and suspended (supernatant) fractions revealed distinct differences in the bacterial community structure. Settled biomass was dominated by Firmicutes (45%) of which 80% were members of the Clostridia. Proteobacteria were also abundant (39%) and included, in order of dominance, the γ- (20%) β- (10%), and α- (8%) classes. In contrast, the supernatant community was dominated by β- Proteobacteria (60%) followed by Firmicutes (26%). Further studies are planned to verify these results and determine the possible bioflocculation role of Proteobacteria in this context.

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  • Communicative effectiveness of individuals with dysarthria following traumatic brain injury

    McAuliffe, M.J.; Carpenter, S.; Moran, C. (2007)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • MARS: Colour x-rays of people

    Butler, A.P.H.; MARS-CT Team (2008)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    Goal: To produce a poster for New Zealand high schools explaining a new form of medical imaging. Background: The MARS team has developed an novel x-ray scanner which produces three dimensional spectroscopic x-ray images of small animals and pathology specimens. The scanner, dubbed MARS (Medipix All Resolution System), has been built by University of Canterbury physicists and engineers. The scanner uses the Medipix photon processsing x-ray detector. It is now being used by the radiology department of the University of Otago, Christchurch to establish clinical applications. Method: To convey the difference between traditional medical x-ray systems and spectroscopic systems we used the analogy of observing patterns in a stained glass windows using visible light. To present our initial results, MARS images are shown next to conventional non-spectroscopic CT images. Colour was chosen to display the spectroscopic nature of the MARS images. Results: The poster will be used for the “Medical Imaging Outreach Kit”. The kit also contains a short video on the MARS project and equipment for demonstrating a range of radiation physics. Conclusion: The analogy of colour is felt to be useful for for explaining spectroscopy. It is accurate as the spectroscopic information in x-rays is equivalent to colour for visible light, except in a different part of the electromagnetic spectrum. In future we will solicit feedback from high school teachers and from the outreach program's speakers to further refine our explanation of the MARS technology.

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  • Prototype X-Ray Detectors Based on CVD Diamond

    Lansley, S.P.; Betzel, G.T.; Baluti, F.; Reinisch, L.; Meyer, J. (2009)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    X-ray detectors have been fabricated from a range of commercially-available chemical vapour deposition (CVD) diamond. They have been packaged and tested in a clinical environment, using clinical apparatus and following clinical procedures: 6 MV linear accelerator, solid water phantom, dosimeter. Some devices exhibited highly desirable characteristics, such as negligible dark currents (sub-pA), low priming doses (few Gy) and high specific sensitivities (up to 586 nC Gy-1 mm-3), demonstrating the potential of these devices as simple-to-use, small size, tissue-equivalent, sensitive x-ray dosimeters. The performance of such devices in clinical applications, such as beam profiling (both depth and off-axis) is currently in progress.

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  • The role of auditory feedback in speech production

    Katseff, S.; Houde, J.F. (2008)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Integration of somatosensory and auditory information in vowel production

    Katseff, S.; Houde, J.; Johnson, K. (2010)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Assessing the seismic resilience of an underground lifeline: Case study of the Christchurch City potable water network

    Bellagamba, Xavier; Bradley, Brendon; Hughes, Matthew W.; Wotherspoon, Liam (2016)

    Conference poster
    University of Canterbury Library

    essential systems upon which the well-being and functioning of societies depend. They deliver a service or a good to the population using a network, a combination of spatially-distributed links and nodes. As they are interconnected, network elements’ functionality is also interdependent. In case of a failure of one component, many others could be momentarily brought out-of-service. Further problems arise for buried infrastructure when it comes to buried infrastructure in earthquake and liquefaction-prone areas for the following reasons: • Technically more demanding inspections than those required for surface horizontal infrastructure • Infrastructure subject to both permanent ground displacement and transient ground deformation • Increase in network maintenance costs (i.e. deterioration due to ageing material and seismic hazard) These challenges suggest careful studies on network resilience will yield significant benefits. For these reasons, the potable water network of Christchurch city (Figure 1) has been selected for its well-characterized topology and its extensive repair dataset.

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