231 results for Conference poster

  • ResearchSpace@Auckland : Disaster Recovery (DR)

    Latt, Yin Yin; Hayes, Leonie (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The University of Auckland Library and Information Technology Services have partnered to provide a DSpace installation utilising a mature IT infrastructure. The application is hosted on the University of Auckland’s virtual server cluster in the recently completed “City Data Centre” along with other enterprise systems. ResearchSpace is operational 24x7 and has a Disaster Recovery mirror located at a second location. Handle identifiers are maintained between the two systems to ensure users can submit items at all times.

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  • The CellML Model Repository as a Resource for Cardiac Modelling

    Lawson, J.R.; Nobile, P.J.; Lloyd, C.M.; Neilsen, P.F.; Hunter, P.J. (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Poster presented at Waiheke 2008 Multiscale Modelling of the Heart Workshop. The CellML repository now contains a number of well curated CellML models of cardiac biology and physiology at the cellular and subcellular level. Recently this resource has been growing rapidly in both quality and quantity and includes models of cardiac electrophysiology, excitation-contraction coupling, myofilament mechanics, signalling systems and combinations thereof. Herein we describe the CellML model repository, its range of models, the tools used to develop and test these models and the processes and aims of curating them. The relevance of this resource to multi-scale modelling of the heart in the present and the future is then discussed.

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  • Antifungal properties of sugar lactones

    Oliveira, Maria; Neves, A; Justino, J; Noronha, JP; Marcelo, F; Riccombeni, A; Rauter, AP (2005)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Bronchoconstriction and the MBNW: Insights from anatomical lung modelling.

    Mitchell, Jennine; Tawahi MH (2010-11-30)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Bronchoconstriction and the MBNW: Insights from anatomical lung modelling. Jennine Mitchell and Dr Merryn Tawhai Auckland Bioengineering institute The multiple breath nitrogen washout (MBNW) is a global test of lung function that produces two indices Sacin and Scond that are reflective of ventilation heterogeneity arising at the level of acinus and between more spatially disparate regions of the lung respectively. An important application of the MBNW is in the study of asthma. Ventilation defects have been noted to occur in imaging studies of asthma. These regional ventilation defects have not previously been considered in relation to the MBNW indices. Scond is purported to be related to the state of conducting airways however no modelling studies exist which directly link the airway state to Scond. In this work regional ventilation defects have been simulated in an anatomically based human lung model and theoretically linked to the MBNW indices Sacin and Scond. Ventilation is simualted to the level of the acinus in a model in which acinar ventilation is considered independent of ventialtion in other acini. As previously indicated in modelling studies a high degree of constriction is required to produce a ventilation defect. The relationship between the degree of constriction in airways leading to the defect and the Scond index is however highly non-linear and shows a sharp decrease at very high levels of constriction. Ventilation defects potentially cause non-communication of gas trapped in the ventilation defects with the mouth. This may alter the calculation of FRC if nitrogen dilution is used to calculate FRC. As the indices are dependent on the phase III slope for each breath being normalised by FRC this alters MBNW results. The index Scond is not be able to be explained simply in terms of increased time constants due to increased resistance in the main conducting airway tree. The model indicates that the Scond index is more complex than current MBNW theory indicates and cannot be simply explained in terms of a longer time constant due to constriction in the conducting airway tree resulting in increased late emptying of poorly ventilated regions.

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  • A frontline perspective of organizational change: Analyzing the creation of a Youth Justice entity in Child, Youth and Family using Lewin, Kotter & Schein's change management and organizational culture models

    Webster, Michael; Herrmann, K (2009-03-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Pregnancy Associated Changes in Insulin Signalling in Daughters of Adolescent Ewes

    Oliver, Mark; Hancock, SN; Kenyon, PR; Blair, HT; Pain, S; Morris, S; Phua, Hui; Bloomfield, Francis (2011-09)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Mechanisms Of Differences In Ventilation Distribution In The Upright, Supine, And Prone Postures

    Tawhai, Merryn; Hedges, Kerry (2011-05-13)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Rationale: Measurements of ventilation distribution using various imaging modalities have suggested that the distribution of ventilation in the supine and prone postures is less evidently gravitational than when the lung is upright, and with some studies showing little difference between ventilation distributions in the prone and supine lung. This is despite the concurrent observations of a significant gradient in tissue density when supine, and a typically smaller - or absent - tissue density gradient prone. In this study we use a computational model of lung tissue elasticity coupled to air-flow to study the relationship between posture, density distribution, and ventilation. Methods: An imaging-based geometric model of the lung and airway tree that was developed in a separate study was used here. Flow in the airways was simulated using a one-dimensional fluid dynamics model that includes flow-dependent airway resistance and coupling to tissue elasticity at the airway walls and at the acini. A finite deformation elasticity model was used to predict the effect of gravity on tissue deformation, and the non-linear elasticity of each acinar tissue unit during simulated breathing. The upright lung volume was defined from pulmonary function testing; the supine and prone volumes were assumed to be the same, and equal to the supine air volume as calculated from the subject's computed tomography imaging acquired at FRC. Tissue density and ventilation at each of the ~32,000 distributed acini in the model were averaged within iso-gravitational slices of 10 mm thickness. Results: The gradient of tissue density predicted by the model was markedly larger in supine than in upright or prone. Ratios of the maximum to minimum slice density were 1.95, 1.51, and 1.39 for supine, prone, and upright, respectively. Ventilation in the upright model increased on average towards the dependent tissue, whereas ventilation in supine and prone was decreased in the most dependent and non-dependent regions. The ratios of maximum to minimum slice ventilation were 1.09, 1.03, and 1.31 for supine, prone, and upright, respectively. Conclusions: A lack of gravitational distribution of ventilation in the supine and prone postures compared with upright is predicted on the basis of the smaller size of the horizontal lung and a shift of the dependent tissue to a less-compliant region of the sigmoidal pressure-volume curve at its lower asymptote. This is the same mechanism that results in early filling of the non-dependent tissue when inhaling from residual volume.

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  • Orbscan And Pentacam Analysis Of The Cornea In Marfan And Suspected Marfan Syndrome.

    Vincent, Andrea; Ikink, W; Al-Taie, R (2011-05-02)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Pneumococcal Vaccine Decreases Hospitalised Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Children <Two Years In An Area Of High Respiratory Disease Burden

    Trenholme, A; Lennon, Diana; Best, Emma; Stewart, Joanna; Mcbride, C; Byrnes, Catherine; Walker, W; Percival, T; Mason, H; Vogel, A (2011-11-16)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Effects of a self-adjuvanting Synthetic Long Peptide targeting TLR2 on human immune cells

    Burkert, Kristina; Mansell, Claudia; McIntosh, Julie; Brooks, Anna; Angel, Catherine; Winkler, S; Harris, Paul; Williams, Geoffrey; Brimble, Margaret; Dunbar, Peter (2010-10-27)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • An investigation into the teaching of extemporaneous compounding skills to pharmacy students in schools of pharmacy in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, South Africa and the United Kingdom

    Aspden, Trudi; Rew, A; Anderson, C; Tan, J; Woodrow, R; Zheng, Y (2011)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background: Many countries require that registered pharmacists are competent to extemporaneously compound. In general, however, there is a lack of opportunity for interns and new pharmacists to practice extemporaneous compounding due to the reduction in demand for extemporaneously compounded products in community pharmacy. Thus it falls to schools of pharmacy to prepare future pharmacist for this role. Objectives: With respect to extemporaneous compounding to pharmacy undergraduates- to determine what is taught, how it is taught, how it is assessed and the time allocated to teaching in the different schools of pharmacy in the five countries. Methodology: Thirty eight course coordinators involved in the teaching of extemporaneous compounding from 32 schools of pharmacy in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, South Africa and the United Kingdom were invited to complete an online survey using Survey MonkeyTM. Results: Twenty four responses were obtained from participants in all five countries (response rate 63.2%). Extemporaneous compounding was a compulsory component of all the BPharm programmes. However, there was a wide inter and intra-country variation in the teaching of the subject including the number of hours dedicated to its teaching, the dosage forms included and the teaching methods used. Many schools used extemporaneous compounding teaching to introduce transferrable skills, such as the ability to accurately calculate. A strong desire to retain the teaching of extemporaneous compounding was expressed by the course coordinators. Discussion: Our results highlight differences in the extemporaneous compounding teaching of the BPharm programmes in the five countries surveyed, but also uncover its use in developing related skills.

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  • Preclinical rationale for the ongoing Phase 2 study of the hypoxia-activated EGFR-TKI tarloxotinib bromide (TH-4000) in patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) or skin (SCCS).

    Jackson, V; Silva, S; Abbattista, Maria; Guise, Christopher; Bull, Matthew; Ashoorzadeh, Amir; Hart, C; Pearce, T; Smaill, Jeffrey; Patterson, Adam (2015)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Diabetes Management by Primary Health Care Nurses in Auckland, New Zealand

    Daly, Barbara; Arroll, B; Sheridan, N; Kenealy, T; Scragg, R (2011-11-04)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Methods PHC nurses in Auckland (a 26% random sample) were asked to complete postal and telephone questionnaires (86% response rate), on education, experience, knowledge and diabetes management practice, and to log their care given to diabetes patients on a randomly selected day (n=265). Results Responses were received from 287 PHC nurses (86% response rate) comprising 210 practice nurses (PN), 49 district nurses (DN) and 28 specialist nurses (SNs). Most nurses (96%) were able to identify excess body weight as a major risk factor for type 2 diabetes and elevated blood glucose levels (BGLs) or glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) (86%) for diabetes-related complications. In contrast, CV risk factors were less well identified, particularly smoking, although more by SNs (43%) than PNs (14%) and DNs (12%, p=0.0005). CV complications, especially stroke, were less well known than microvascular complications, and by significantly fewer PNs (13%) and DNs (8%) than SNs (36%, p=0.002). Stronger associations were found between nurse’s knowledge of elevated HbA1c as a risk factor for diabetes-related complications and management activities related to BGLs and medication, compared with knowledge of CV risk factors, which was not associated with assessment of blood pressure or knowledge of patient’s total cholesterol or smoking status. The median number of patients consulted on the randomly selected day was one by 38% of PNs, two by 47% of DNs and 4-5 by 57% of SNs. Overall, PNs consulted almost 60% of the patients sampled, while patients consulted by DNs were older and more likely to be European New Zealanders, tobacco uses and have diabetes-related complications and co-morbidities, while SNs consulted by Maori and Pacific patients. Conclusion: There is a need for PHC nurses to increase their knowledge of CV risk factors with more effective management required and particularly of smoking.

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  • Multi-dimensional model generalisation of human activity patterns in space and time

    Zhao, Jinfeng; Forer, Pip (2007-09-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Factors Influencing the Aroma Stability of New Zealand Sauvignon blanc

    Herbst, M; Nicolau, Laura; Kilmartin, Paul (2009-08)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Factors Influencing the Aroma Stability of New Zealand Sauvignon blanc

    Herbst-Johnstone, Mandy; Kilmartin, PA; Nicolau, L (2009)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Identification of a lead hypoxia-activated irreversible pan-HER inhibitor SN32807 (PR509) by pharmacokinetic and anti-tumor efficacy screening in an erlotinib-resistant xenograft model

    Jaiswal, Jagdish; Lu, Guo-Liang; Jamieson, S; Lee, Ho; Abbattista, Maria; Anderson, BF; Ashoorzadeh, Amir; Denny, William; Doñate, F; Hsu, HL; Maroz, A; Pruijn, A; Puryer, M; Thompson, Aaron; Wilson, William; Smaill, Jeffrey; Patterson, Adam (2011-10-23)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Clever Crosswalking - what do you take from one system to another?

    Zhao, Yanan; Shepherd, Kim; Hayes, Sharron; Schweer, A (2013)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The poster looked at a metadata crosswalk implemented between a DSpace repository and a Research Management System (RMS) at the University of Auckland (UoA). The crosswalk facilitated the exposure of publication metadata from the internal RMS to the DSpace repository with the least amount of work and highest amount of accuracy.

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  • An Approach for Evaluating Robustness of Edge Operators using Real-World Driving Scenes

    Al-Sarraf, Ali; Vaudrey, Tobi; Klette, Reinhard; Woo, Young Woon (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Conference Details: 2008 23rd International Conference Image and Vision Computing New Zealand Lincoln University, Christchurch, 26-28 November 2008. http://www.lvl.co.nz/ivcnz2008/ Over the past 20 years there have been many papers that compare and evaluate di erent edge operators. Most of them focus on accuracy and also do comparisons against synthetic data. This paper focuses on real-world driver assistance scenes and does a comparison based on robustness. The three edge operators compared are Sobel, Canny and the under-publicized phase-based Kovesi-Owens operator. The Kovesi- Owens operator has the distinct advantage that it uses one pre-selected set of parameters and can work across almost any type of scene, where as other operators require parameter tuning. The results from our comparison show that the Kovesi-Owens operator is the most robust of the three, and can get decent results, even under weak illumination and varying gradients in the images. Keywords: edge operators, edge robustness evaluation, Kovesi-Owens, phase operators

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  • Multi-Scale and Multi-Physics Visualization

    Blackett, Shane; Bullivant, D; Nickerson, David; Hunter, Peter (2005-07-31)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Accurate computational models of physiology require the coupling of different physical processes that occur across a wide range of spatial scales. The interpretation and analysis of the calculated results of these models require the integrated visualization of these multi-scale and multi-physics processes. A number of different strategies for doing this are presented for a model of the heart left ventricle.

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