239 results for Conference poster

  • Identifying and Visualizing Surface Detail on Michelangelo's David

    Rugis, John (2007)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    We present the results of new experiments in which we have identified, characterized, and produced visualizations of selected fine surface detail on Michelangelo’s David statue. Starting with available raw scan data [Levoy et al. 2000], we have applied a number of techniques, both developed and refined by us, including the calculation of curvature maps, 2.5D spatial noise filtering, texture projection merging [Rugis 2006], and image processing assisted physical measurement. ....

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  • Energy and nutrient modelling of human evolution

    McGill, Anne-Thea; Wake, G; Beedle, Alan (2010-10)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    ENERGY AND NUTRIENT MODELLING OF HUMAN EVOLUTION Background. During evolution, human encephalisation resulted in high energy use by the large brain in proportion to the body. Adaptations to increase energy intake or reduce total body energy to redress this imbalance may have involved 1) highly developed neural appetite pathways including the dopaminergic mesocorticolimbic self -reward system to enhance energy dense food intake 2) an expensive tissue trade off including a short adaptable gut that relies on a higher energy omnivorous diet 3) slow growth and development and thus careful preservation of cellular integrity to reduce oxidative stress and allow longevity 4) inhibition/alteration of energy expensive vitamin and co-factor synthesis and a dependence on the wide variety of food micronutrients. It appears that many such food micronutrients are modulating cellular energy use, and that micronutrient quality must be built into energy requirements. Concurrently, humans were developing technologies such as tool use and fire to further expand food quality and quantity. However, the neural self reward aspect systems pushed technology to favour high and secure energy yields. Animal husbandry and plant crop farming lead to selective breeding for high fat, starch and sugar produce, at the expense of micronutrient variety and volume. Once technology progressed to factory farming, and mechanised and chemical food processing systems, proportions of food micronutrients/macronutrients were markedly altered. Humans are driven to consume addictive energy dense foodstuffs but (unconsciously) neglect to acquire adequate micronutrient volumes. They are forced to attempt to store the energy firstly safely in subcutaneous adipose, then centrally around viscera, and finally in non-adipose cells where glycolipotoxicity occurs. Aims: We plan to start developing new dynamic energy equations, with reference to Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) models for other biological systems. Ultimately, the ‘ideal’ prehistoric fit and healthy, lean hunter-gatherer will be compared with the contemporary sedentary and (metabolically) degenerate, obese ‘westernised-diet’ consuming human. Method: Principles of DEB and mathematical modelling of energy use will be reviewed with respect to human metabolism and different diets.

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  • Pride and Prejudice: Social Workers’ Experiences of the Profession

    Staniforth, Barbara; Beddoe, L (2016-06-28)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Effects of complex milk lipid components on neurodevelopment in vitro

    Lim, JH; Hodgkinson, S; Dragunow, M; Norris, C; Vickers, M (2010-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Are doctoral theses changing over time?

    Brailsford, Ian; Sowden, Elizabeth; Orioli Figueira, Brigida (2016-04-22)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    This poster presents longitudinal data on the length and chapter composition of 800 doctoral theses deposited at the University of Auckland between 2008 and 2015. Over this period, the doctoral statute has been amended to allow for more flexibility in the format of a thesis submitted for examination, such as the inclusion of creative practice and peer-reviewed publications. In addition, the funding mechanisms for doctorates in New Zealand have put a premium on candidates completing in a timely fashion. Given these two contexts we speculated that the length of an average doctoral thesis would be declining over time. One hundred doctoral theses – overwhelmingly PhD theses with a smattering of name doctorates –deposited in the University Library from each calendar year were randomly selected to assess: the number of pages; chapter composition; and inclusion of published papers within the thesis. These data were then correlated against academic faculty to tease out variations across the disciplines. Overall, our findings indicate that the doctoral thesis has remained relatively stable in length and chapter structure.

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  • The development of a whey-based kefir beverage: Physiocochemical, sensory and microbiological characteristics

    Chan, Cheuk; Quek, Siew-Young; Roberton, AM (2007-11-15)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • New antifungal and antibacterial compounds: 1,3-oxazoline- and 1,3-oxazolidine-2-thiones

    Oliveira, Maria; Justino, J; Silva, S; Tatibouet, A; Rollin, P; Rauter, AP (2009-01-20)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Sequence Coverage Abnormalities and Sex-Specific Autosomal Regions in Cattle

    Lopdell, Thomas; Harland, C; Johnson, T; Keehan, M (2012-08-21)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Detection of tissue- and sex-specific gene expression in Bos taurus using high depth RNA sequencing

    Lopdell, Thomas; Littlejohn, M (2013-08-13)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Monitoring the health of New Zealand’s young people: A decade of surveillance research

    Clark, TC; Fleming, T; Bullen, P; Crengle, S; Denny, S; Dyson, B; Peiris John, R; Robinson, E; Rossen, F; Sheridan, J; Teevale, T; Utter, J; Fortune, S; Lewycka, S (2013)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Over-expression of Human Amylin Leads to Oligomerization and beta-cell Dysfunction Associated with Mitochondrial Uncoupling, Activation of c-Jun and Decrease Expression of JNK Interacting Protein-1

    Zhang, Shaoping; Liu, H; Chuang, CL; Li, XL; Au, M; Zhang, L; Cooper, GJS (2012-06-10)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Over-expression of human amylin (hA) in pancreatic β-cells has been shown to contribute to cytotoxic hA aggregation and islet amyloid formation that can lead to β-cell dysfunction in type-2 diabetes mellitus. We aimed to investigate the functional and molecular changes associated with hA oligomer formation and their relation to β-cell dysfunction and diabetes development using transgenic mouse model that over-expresses hA in their islet β-cells.We showed that both homozygous and hemizygous hA transgenic mice developed spontaneous diabetes with different elevated levels of hA and with different time frame of disease onset and death. Homozygous mice displayed hyperinsulinemia and self-limiting insulin resistance during the pre-diabetic state, whereas by contrast, hemizygous mice had a longer prediabetic phase without insulin resistance. Intracellular and extracellular oligomers were clearly detectable before onset of diabetes with strong correlation with the time of β-cell apoptosis occurred in homozygous but not in hemizygous mice, indicating a difference in the extent of cytotoxic oligomerization between these animals. In addition, RT-qPCR analysis demonstrated progressive decrease in β-cell expression of functional and key regulatory molecules such as insulin, amylin, Pdx1, MafA, Glut2 and GCK. We also detected changes in expression of the mitochondrial membrane protein UCP-2 which contributes to decreased mitochondrial function. Further molecular analysis demonstrated activation of c-Jun/JNK and decrease expression of JNK-interacting protein 1, suggesting their role in mediating beta-cell death/apoptosis. Our studies should lead to a better understanding of the role and regulation of hA-evoked β-cell dysfunction and β-cell death in diabetes

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  • Purine nucleosides as new agents for the control of Alzheimer’s disease

    Oliveira, Maria; Marcelo, F; Justino, J; Jacob, AP; Bleriot, Y; Sinay, P; Goulart, M; Rauter, AP (2009-01-20)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Purine Nucleosides as Cholinesterase Inhibitors

    Marcelo, F; Rauter, AP; Blériot, Y; Sinaÿ, P; Oliveira, Maria; Goulart, M; Justino, J (2008-09)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The development of online learning environments (OLEs) at The University of Auckland Library: collaboration, integration and usability testing

    Zdravkovic, Neda (2013-04-09)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    In order to meet the learning needs of a large number of in-house, flexible learning and distance-learning students from a variety of disciplines, The University of Auckland Library has enhanced the provision of information and academic literacy instruction through the design of online learning environments. Learning Services Librarians, learning designers and subject librarians from The University of Auckland Library have collaborated with faculty, Centre for Academic Development staff, graphic design professionals and web developers to design online courses and tutorials, such as: • Academic Integrity - stand-alone online academic integrity course, compulsory for all new students at the University of Auckland from Semester I 2013; • COMLAW 101: New Zealand’s Legal Framework - curriculum- integrated information literacy online tutorial designed for COMLAW 101: Law in a Business Environment academic course with 2000 students each year; • POPLHLTH 701: Research Methods in Health - curriculum- integrated online information literacy learning environment for postgraduate students completing the POPLHLTH 701: Research Methods in Health course and compulsory assessment activity bearing 15% course mark; • FTVMS 100: Assignment Research Path – curriculum-integrated information literacy online tutorial and compulsory assessment activity (10% course mark) designed for FTVMS 100: Media studies first year undergraduate course with 1000 students each year; • Understanding Your Reading List - generic information literacy online tutorial designed for all first year undergraduate students. The focus of the paper will be on the development framework of online courses, curriculum-integrated and generic tutorials and the analysis of different stages of each project, their collaborative nature and usability testing practices applied (user observation, focus group interviews, surveys) and outcomes. It will introduce CourseBuilder as a web-based tool for the design of online learning environments and activities, its features, functionalities and published outputs. CourseBuilder, developed by the University of Auckland’s Centre for Academic Development, is an authoring tool that provides customisable templates to develop online interactive activities (eg, case studies, reflections and quizzes), import text, insert media, monitor student responses and more. Finally the paper will describe issues and challenges during each development stage, as well as benefits and limitations of using an online learning environment development system.

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  • Coronary artery bifurcation haemodynamics - comparison between phase contrast MRI and computational fluid dynamics

    Beier, Susann; Ormiston, J; Webster, M; Cater, John; Medrano-Garcia, P; Young, Alistair; Cowan, Brett (2014-01-17)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Coronary atherosclerosis is common at vessel bifurcations. A quantitative approach to measuring blood velocity, vorticity and more complex flow features at bifurcations would enhance the understanding of the mechanisms of atheroma development, and potentially predict vessels at highest risk. The aim of this work was to validate 4D phase contrast (PC) magnetic resonance imaging flow measurements using a simplified arterial model of the left main coronary bifurcation against computational fluid dynamic (CFD) modelling.

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  • Getting Research 'Out There': ResearchSpace@Auckland

    Newton-Wade, Vanessa; Laurie, John; Hayes, Leonie (2007)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    A key part of the academic research process is publishing the results – ‘getting it out there’. An institutional repository such as ResearchSpace@Auckland provides authors with a channel for near-instantaneous worldwide dissemination of research. ResearchSpace@Auckland has been developed at the University of Auckland under the umbrella of the Institutional Repositories Aotearoa Project (Ira). Built using DSpace Open Source Software, the repository contains ‘research outputs’ from the University of Auckland’s staff and students, including theses, papers and reports. The PhD thesis collection is the flagship of the repository – electronic submission is compulsory for all completing PhD students from 2011. The initial 200 items in the PhD thesis collection were gathered by contacting authors of theses submitted at the University of Auckland since 2001 and inviting them to submit digital copies and consent forms. Trials are underway to digitize theses that are unavailable in digital format. The mandating of compulsory submission for PhD theses submitted at the University of Auckland ensures regulatory requirements for digital deposit are catered for. Other collections for articles, papers, and images are being developed.

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  • Registry of BioBricks models using CellML

    Rouilly, Vincent; Canton, Barry; Nielsen, Poul; Kitney, Richard (2007)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. One of the main goals in Synthetic Biology is to assess the feasibility of building novel biological systems from interchangeable and standardized parts. In order to collect and share parts, a Registry of standardized DNA BioBricks http://parts.mit.edu/registry has been established at the MIT. BioBricks can be assembled to form devices and systems to operate in living cells. Design of reliable devices and systems would benefit from accurate models of system function. To predict the function of systems built from many parts, we need to have accurate models for the parts and mechanisms to easily compose those part models into a system model. Therefore, in parallel to increasing the number of parts available and characterising them experimentally, a logical extension to the Registry would be to build a Registry of BioBrick models to complement the physical parts.

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  • Space-Time Multi-Resolution Banded Graph-Cut for Fast Segmentation. (Conference Poster)

    Vaudrey, Tobi; Gruber, Daniel; Wedel, Andreas; Klappstein, Jens (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Conference Details: 30th Annual Symposium of the German Association for Pattern Recognition DAGM Munich, Germany, June 2008. http://www.dagm2008.org/ Applying real-time segmentation is a major issue when processing every frame of image sequences. In this paper, we propose a modi cation of the well known graph-cut algorithm to improve speed for discrete segmentation. Our algorithm yields real-time segmentation, using graph-cut, by performing a single cut on an image with regions of di erent resolutions, combining space-time pyramids and narrow bands. This is especially suitable for image sequences, as segment borders in one image are re ned in the next image. The fast computation time allows one to use information contained in every image frame of an input image stream at 20 Hz, on a standard PC. The algorithm is applied to traf- c scenes, using a monocular camera installed in a moving vehicle. Our results show the segmentation of moving objects with similar results to standard graph-cut, but with improved speed.

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  • Goal: Real-Time Segmentation via Graph Cut Goal: Real-Time Segmentation via Graph Cut

    Vaudrey, Tobi; Wedel, Andreas; Rabe, Clemens; Klappstein, Jens; Klette, Reinhard (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Conference Details: 2008 23rd International Conference Image and Vision Computing New Zealand. IVCNZ 08. Lincoln University, Christchurch, 26-28 November 2008. http://www.lvl.co.nz/ivcnz2008/ The detection of moving objects is a crucial part of driver assistance systems. This paper tackles this issue using computer vision. Two approaches are investigated, monocular and stereoscopic. The base principals and implementational issues are discussed and detailed, high- lighting areas of concern. In both cases, the detection is based on motion analysis of individually tracked image points (optical ow). The monoc- ular approach relies solely on the optical ow, where as the stereoscopic approach also takes stereo depth information into account. In both ap- proaches the motion analysis provides a motion metric which corresponds to the likelihood that the tracked point is moving. Based on this metric the points are segmented into objects by employing the globally op- timal graph cut algorithm. These approaches are then compared and contrasted using real-world vehicle image sequences.

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  • Benefits of speech & language therapy for hearing impaired children

    Fairgray, Liz; Purdy, Suzanne (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Conference details: Reflecting Connections 2008, the second conference jointly hosted by the New Zealand Speech-Language Therapists Association and Speech Pathology Australia. Held at the SKYCITY Convention Centre in Auckland, New Zealand, from the 25th to the 29th of May, 2008. http://www.reflectingconnections.co.nz/ Although the need for speech and language therapy is widely recognized for children who are hearing impaired, there is little research evidence for improved outcomes after specific speech and language therapy interventions. With improvements in hearing aid and cochlear implant technology, and consequently improved access to the speech signal, there has been greater emphasis on listening-based therapies. The most widely used therapy is referred to as “auditory-verbal therapy” (AVT). This approach is endorsed by the Alexander Graham Bell Association, but there is paucity of research evidence for AVT effectiveness (Rhoades, 1982; Goldberg & Flexer, 1993; Wray et al., 1997; Rhoades & Chisholm, 2000). Previous studies have focused on psychosocial and educational outcomes of AVT, rather than measuring specific speech and language outcomes. The current study investigates speech and language, speech perception in noise and reading abilities before and after a 6-month period of weekly AVT with an experienced Certified Auditory-Verbal and Speech-language Therapist. Participants are eight children aged 5 to 17 years with moderate-profound sensorineural hearing loss using cochlear implants (CI) and/or hearing aids.

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