3 results for Creative work, 2007

  • "is there anybody in there" and "Fragment for String Quartet" - two pieces for mixed chamber ensemble.

    Holmes, Leonie (2007)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Two compositions for mixed chamber ensemble These two compositions for mixed chamber ensemble are the second and third in a trio of pieces on the theme of fleeting visions of the unconscious, written as companion pieces to my chamber work "Inquietude", 2003. "is there anybody in there?" was written for bassoonist Ben Hoadley for inclusion in his concert series “New Zealand Music for Woodwind”, featuring work from New Zealand Composers, and was premiered in the Music Theatre, School of Music, University of Auckland, April 2010. Reviewed by William Dart for the New Zealand Herald, 12 April 2010: “ Holmes made much of Messiaen-like chords underpinning willowy lines, especially effective with flute, bassoon and piano deliriously intertwining”. Is there anybody in there? was repeated later in the year at All Saints Church, Howick in a concert series entitled Thursdays @ 7, 2 September 2010, and then at the third annual New Zealand Music for Woodwind concert, St Andrews on the Terrace, Wellington 20 April 2011. "Fragment for String Quartet" was commissioned by “The Committee” for a concert at the Clocktower, University of Auckland, 21 September 2007, featuring the Jade Quartet, who subsequently took the work on their tour of the South Island in October/November 2007. The Jade String Quartet comprises Auckland Philharmonia members Miranda Adams, William Hanfling, Robert Ashworth and Claudia Price. The work has been recorded and broadcast by Concert FM, and has had subsequent performances by the Karlheinz Company, 4 October 2009, and student group DSCH Quartet 23 May 2010. The Karlheinz Company concert was reviewed in the NZ Herald by William Dart 16 December 2009: “its wisps and spiralling of sound had a wonderful airiness”

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  • These arms to hold you: for children's voices and orchestra; text by Bill Manhire

    de Castro-Robinson, EK; Manhire, W (2007)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Composer a work for orchestra and children's voices commissioned for the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra by the Royal NZ Plunket Society to celebrate its 100th anniversary. A collaboration with poet Bill Manhire from Victoria University.

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  • Cirrus

    Matthews, Stephen (2007)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    My role in the creation of this work was as the composer as well as the provision of complete parts to the NZSO including the addition of the final string bowings The title Cirrus is taken from the first stanza of James K. Baxter’s poem, High Country Weather (1948). Alone we are born And die alone Yet see the red-gold cirrus Over snow mountain shine Upon the upland road Ride easy stranger Surrender to the sky Your heart of anger What appealed was the depiction of individual endeavour, the expansive backdrop of New Zealand rural imagery and the poem’s final plea. Despite the foreboding beginning, metaphorically the ‘red-gold cirrus’ foretells of a change for the better. Cirrus are beautiful high transparent clouds typically streaming in the direction of the wind, usually signalling the arrival of fair weather. The opening of the piece employs high-pitched bell-like chords. While the upper and lower strings hold a sustained note, a bass clarinet introduces the first significant melodic theme. After the first full-orchestral climax the texture of the climax quickly dissipates to reveal a high-pitched modal melody. The brass abruptly interrupts this moment of quiet with an augmentation of the previous theme. After this interruption subsides the character of the music gradually becomes more uplifting and confident. Then solo instruments perform themes over a lively syncopated chromatic pizzicato bass line and variations of the original theme repeat, driving the music forward to reach the final climax. The piece ends with a final recapitulation of the high modal melody and arpeggiated echoes of the opening bell-like chords in the tuned percussion.

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